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Travel North - 20: Commmondale Circuit, Walk the Dale, Climb the Moor to Hob Cross by the Quakers' Causeway

On the moor, high above Commondale, where the Hob watches unseen by day...

(A long way east of the Pennines), high on Commondale Moor, Hob Cross is your route marker. Come watch kestrels hover in their hunt for small animals in the heather and gorse roots

(A long way east of the Pennines), high on Commondale Moor, Hob Cross is your route marker. Come watch kestrels hover in their hunt for small animals in the heather and gorse roots

The Cleveland Inn in Commondale - starting  and finishing point for your walk, worth spending time resting after your exertions

The Cleveland Inn in Commondale - starting and finishing point for your walk, worth spending time resting after your exertions

Route: Commondale - Quakers' Causeway - Hob Cross - Hob on the Hill - Whiteley Beck - Commondale

Transport by rail brings you from the Middlesbrough-Whitby line to Commondale, from where a footpath links the single platform with the village. There is a local bus service, the Moorsbus, which operates from the beginning of April to the end of September, handy for walkers and a supplement to the rail service.

For both rail and bus services search www.yorkshiretravel.net.

Parking is available around Commondale village for motorists. It might help to stop at the cleveland Inn and buy a few drinks, ask the staff for permission to park for the duration of your walk. They will keep a weather eye on your car(s). You should not be away for more than a couple of hours anyway, unless you have a picnic foreseen en route. Getting there by car is similar to Kildale, and there is a road that crosses the Moors from the A171 Guisborough-Whitby road. The last stretch of the road that comes away from the A171 is steep and 'bendy', however, and caution is called for when approaching the village from the north. Watch out for wandering sheep.

Starting from Commondale village, pass one of the finely-constructed red brick houses - using the locally-manufactured bricks - along the Kildale road. Turn right off this road and head towards the first stone 'trod' or causeway, and cross Whiteley Beck. This trod leads past a pair of war memorials to two loal men, Grenadier Guardsmen Robbie Leggott (killed in action in 1916) and Alf Cockerill (who died of his wounds sustained in fighting in 1914). These fellows were known to have been found of walking around their home turf before enlisting.

Finding the track onward to 'Hob on the Hill' is not easy, but even if you pass too far along the track you find a pre-historic stone boundary alignment. This takes you up some way to the left of the 'Hob'. Look out for this marker (a bit like a standing stone sausage). The boundary marker has carved on it 'S Hob on the Hill' (O.S. Ref. 646 124) and stands amid an excavated tumulus or Bronze Age burial mound. Often used in names (e.g. 'Hobson'), A 'Hob' derives from folklore linked to witchcraft and has been described as a hairy, ugly dwarf that dwelt in moorland steadings (a bit like the modern concept of Trolls). On the other side of the stone see the inscription 'RC 1798', referring to local landowner Robert Chaloner Esquire, (whose descendants owned iron ore-bearing land near Guisborough that was mined in the latter 19th Century). Around it are aligned stones that have been there several thousand years. You might like to leave the path to the south-west to investigate 'Hob on the Hill' and view the unique stone and earth bank boundary.

The stones - one of which has been carved with a cross to denote a 'change of spiritual ownership' - of the 'boundary wall' are set in a low embankment. Look around towards Castleton village in the south-east and Danby Dale beyond. Westerdale is to the right of Castleton. Looking northward you can see the North Sea beyond Guisborough (out of sight at this point below you). Westward are the Cleveland Hills ('Kliffe-land' or 'Cliff-land' to the Danes who settled the lower-lying land in the Guisborough-Stokesley area). Head roughly north-east - seaward - and locate a track that takes you to a line of boundary stones, then almost due north to 'Hob Cross'. At the bottom end of the boundary stones is 'Hob Cross' itself, just before the corner of a walled field. Along the way is a boundary stone marked 'SK AWD 1844' and below that 'TC 1856'. The next stone is 'Hob Cross' itself, marked like 'Hob on the Hill' with 'RC 1798' (O.S. Ref 646 134). This is the half-way point. Nearby is a private memorial to 'Lilian Foulkes RIP 3/7/1914 to 24/6/2007'.

A paved stone trod, the Quakers' Causeway cuts across the moor towards the ridge that overlooks Guisborough. Packhorse trains bore goods along pannier ways such as this ('panniers' were baskets strapped either side of the horses to carry goods to market) impressive stone-flagged track. You will soon look downward at Lockwood Beck Reservoir with the coast beyond. Looking eastward see the natural cone of Freebrough Hill near the Castleton road that leads to the distant A171 Guisborough-Whitby moorland highway (O.S. Ref 671 117). A tip: if you want to know what the weather holds, look out for sheep on Freebrough Hill. If they're scattered around the base of the hill keep your weatherproof handy.

Follow the clearly marked track downward from the Castleton road and Commondale comes into view. On the final leg of your walk into the village the plain red brick-built St Peter's church stands on the right. Lastly enter the village past the Old Post Office Tearoom and back to the Cleveland Inn.

Mapping out the route

Alternative starting and finishing point, the Old Post Office Tearoom in Commondale village

Alternative starting and finishing point, the Old Post Office Tearoom in Commondale village

Looking down towards the natural conical  Freebrough Hill

Looking down towards the natural conical Freebrough Hill

Lockwood Beck Reservoir with the North Sea beyond

Lockwood Beck Reservoir with the North Sea beyond

Looking down towards Commondale from the moor

Looking down towards Commondale from the moor

The Quakers' Causeway, a stone flagged route across the moor for pack horses and tinkers on foot - well worn over the centuries, in places better preserved

The Quakers' Causeway, a stone flagged route across the moor for pack horses and tinkers on foot - well worn over the centuries, in places better preserved

Private memorial to someone dear, named Lilian Foulkes near 'Hob Cross'

Private memorial to someone dear, named Lilian Foulkes near 'Hob Cross'

 See description below

See description below

Collins' ramblers' guide to walks across the North Yorkshire Moors up to three hours' duration. Find your way around with the aid of this handy book - it's easy enough to get lost, even if it isn't Texas - between coast and country. Informative, clear and value for money. As a past rambler - distance away south is my only limitation - I've thumbed my copy often enough to the point where the corners are dog-eared and browned (I think it's time I bought myself another copy)

Homing in on the Hob

The 'Hob on the Hill' - associated with witchcraft and hobgoblins, hairy dwarves who lived in small moorland steadings and frolicked with the witches under the stars on Midsummer

The 'Hob on the Hill' - associated with witchcraft and hobgoblins, hairy dwarves who lived in small moorland steadings and frolicked with the witches under the stars on Midsummer

Commondale Moor walk via the Quakers Causeway, Hob On The Hill and Hob Cross are ancient waymarkers that have guided wayfarers back through pre-history

Commondale Moor walk via the Quakers Causeway, Hob On The Hill and Hob Cross are ancient waymarkers that have guided wayfarers back through pre-history

Commondale Moor, North Yorkshire (steer northward from the station then north-east from the village)

Over the moors and far away...

If you enjoyed this one, try some of the other walks - long and short - in the TRAVEL NORTH series. Walks and cycle rides extend from East Yorkshire (Hornsea and Flamborough Head) to North Yorkshire (Saltburn cliffops, Port Mulgrave to Hinderwell on the coast, Eston Moors, Roseberry Topping, Nidderdale, Upper Wharfedale inland; Chester-le-Street to Consett in County Durham, Kielder Water, Hadrian's Wall and Bamburgh in Northumberland.

There are also several drives in North Yorkshire that cross into County Durham and back into the top corner of Yorkshire on the way to Tan Hill, around Swaledale and Wensleydale via Richmond.

If you're left hungering for more, there are travel links on each page, with web addresses and phone numbers.

Enjoy your trip!

© 2012 Alan R Lancaster

Comments

Robert Sacchi on December 09, 2019:

Yes, I understand time getting eaten up. It always seems the case, so much to do, so little time.

Alan R Lancaster (author) from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire) on December 09, 2019:

Don't knock it. We've got falls in this country and around the British Isles that people are proud of, but the real 'biggie' is Angel Falls (Venezuela, isn't it?). See the page on the Tees early on in this series, that finishes above High Force in Upper Teesdale, the source of the river emerges from the Pennines as a 'gill' a spring on the side of a hill. I'll take a scout around your pages when I've got time (between track-laying on my layout project -'Ainthorpe Jct - and writing on here).

Robert Sacchi on December 08, 2019:

No, Great Falls is probably the best natural tourist attraction in the Washington DC metropolitan area. It's nice to see, shameless self promotion I wrote a Hub about it, but it's pathetic compared to Niagara Falls.

Alan R Lancaster (author) from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire) on December 08, 2019:

If that's Niagara I think there'll be 1001 instant 'hits' to start off with. Get some pics together - needn't be your own, Wikipedia will have some you just need to acknowledge the author of under 'sources'. My wife and younger daughter went there when my younger daughter did her year at Bujffalo University a few years back. There's 'magic' in falling water, Robert.

Robert Sacchi on December 07, 2019:

I believe the closest to where I am is Great Falls National Park.

Alan R Lancaster (author) from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire) on December 07, 2019:

Hello again Robert, welcome to the North Yorkshire Moors. I've been this way lots of times, both on foot and driving. Back in 1960 I went there the first time with the Scouts (Kestrel Patrol - as we stood on the single platform at Commondale station we watched one hover and then dive to the heather-covered moor on the south side of the railway; never saw one before that, not often since).

Take a stout pair of walking boots and weatherrproofs. Whatever the weather's like when you set off, it's guaranteed to change. There's also the 'roak', (the Norse for smoke or mist that rolls over the moors from seaward and dissipates. I've been disoriented on one walk, finished up where I started after missing a turnoff!).

Fancy tackling the 'Lyke Wake Walk'? See the page for enlightenment. Lots of other choices. Any good walks your way?

Robert Sacchi on December 06, 2019:

So much history. It seems a good place for an afternoon stroll.