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Magnificent Treehouses of the World

Gerry Glenn Jones is a writer of fiction and nonfiction, as well as scripts for theatre and film. This is a factual article.

Tarzan's Treehouse at Disneyland

Ever since Tarzan swung out of the Edgar Rice Burroughs' novel in 1914, the treehouse has been a prized possession of young and old alike for many years; however, the tree house has been around much longer than 1914. Tree dwellings can be linked to early civilizations of the people of the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. They lived in tree dwellings as a matter of necessity, for protection. They used thatched baskets to lower themselves to the ground and to ascend to the treehouse. These dwellings protected them from many wild animals and enemies. Franciscan monks used basic tree-rooms for mediation in the Middle Ages, and Hindu monks also lived in tree houses to rid themselves of their earthly surroundings.

Treehouses of Royalty

As the centuries passed, nobles had treehouses built, and they believed the more extravagant ones raised their status among existing nations. Winston Churchill even constructed a 20-foot high treehouse at Chartwell.

Alnwick Garden Treehouse in the Bahamas

Alnwick Garden Treehouse in the Bahamas

Treehouse in Córdoba, Spain

Treehouse in Córdoba, Spain

Tribe That Still Lives in Treehouses

If you wandered into the jungle in the province of Papua, New Guinea, You would be in for a shock. There you would find a tribe of people who are virtually isolated from the outside world and live as they did hundreds of years ago.

The Korowai people have homes, but they are very primitive; no running water, no electricity, and no telephones. But, what is more unique than this is the fact they live in treehouses that are built at heights of 19 feet to 145 feet. These houses help protect the people from enemies, animals, evil spirits and mosquitoes.

Tribe That Still Lives in Treehouses

Tribe That Still Lives in Treehouses

The Minister's Tree House, built by one man out of scrap wood. He said God told him to build it.

The Minister's Tree House, built by one man out of scrap wood. He said God told him to build it.

Minister's Treehouse

One of the most amazing treehouses and one that is possibly the largest in the world is located near Crossville, Tennessee. Though it is now closed due to concerns by the state fire marshal, it was once open to the public. In an article in Wikipedia, this treehouse is described as, "Horace Burgess's Treehouse" (also known as the "Minister's Treehouse"). It's a treehouse and church in Crossville, Tennessee. Construction began in 1993, mostly by Burgess, who had a visionary commandment from God to build a treehouse and he has continued since. Today it is a popular local attraction that has been unofficially called the largest treehouse in the world. It was closed by the state in 2012 for fire code violations." This treehouse is 97 feet tall.

If you love to climb trees, you should visit some of the wonders that other tree enthusiasts have built, or better yet, build your own.



Comments

Brights and Blues by Nishika Chhabra from India on July 06, 2018:

After reading your article, my admiration for tree houses has increased. I really enjoyed reading your article sir. It was not only informative but also fascinating. To know about so many different types of tree houses was just amazing.

Gerry Glenn Jones (author) from Somerville, Tennessee on June 23, 2018:

Thank you, Pamela, I think treehouses are every kid's dream!

Gerry Glenn Jones (author) from Somerville, Tennessee on June 23, 2018:

Thanks, Pamela, I have found that some girls love them too!

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on June 23, 2018:

I never gave much thought to tree houses, but I loved the variety you showed in this article. Of course, I had 3 boys. And, yes they had a tree house.

Interesting article.

Gerry Glenn Jones (author) from Somerville, Tennessee on June 23, 2018:

Thank you so much, Linda and Peggy!

Linda Crampton from British Columbia, Canada on June 22, 2018:

You've shown some very creative tree houses in your photos. It was interesting to read about how some of them have been used.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on May 20, 2018:

It makes sense that people in earlier times would find shelter in tree houses to protect themselves from predators. It is interesting that a tribe of people in New Guinea still do so today according to your article.