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How Europeans got to West Africa and Nigeria

how-europeans-got-to-west-africa-and-nigeria

How Europeans got to West Africa and Nigeria

The European colonization of Africa has negatively impacted on Africa’s nation-building. The European contact with Africa is traceable to the period, when Prince Henry of Portugal led sent some European sailors to find new trading routes from Europe to the Asia Continent (East). Then, Oriental products were invoke or needed in Europe, so the Europeans to travelled long distance to buy these needed items back home from the East or Oriental world. The products were spices particularly pepper then known as “black gold” which the Europeans used for preservation and seasoning, rugs and porcelain were used to heat up their homes against cold and damps, and they also get Damascus steel from the Asian market which the Europeans used in making their swords and armour.

Oriental products were dearth in Europe and that was the main reason why Christopher Columbus’s set out to the Asian markets to get spices, but nature made him to discover the New World unexpectedly. Then, for a bale of cloth to arrive Europe from Asia could take months and years and sometimes sea way-layers used to rob-off European-merchants bought goods on their way to Europe. So, the European-merchants seriously needed a short , comfortable and safe routes to Asia. As they were looking for the new routes to Asia accidentally made the Europeans to land in West Africa and Nigeria in the fifteenth century. The Europeans’ maritime routes to the Orient were: The

Europeans were passing with their goods overland from China and Central Asia were being carried by camel caravans via vast wastelands and high mountain passes. They also passed through Westward across the Indian Ocean and Arabian Desert by camel caravans. Again, they cross the Mediterranean Sea on Ships bound for the Italian cities of Genoa and Venice.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Opuene Kingsley Inowei

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