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Guide to find Abandoned houses: Easier than you might think

Arttu is a long time urban exploring enthusiast. He is a high school student from Finland and an eager photographer.

Search the web, but most importantly, look around you.

Do you want to know the easiest way to find abandoned locations to visit? The law of supply and demand doesn't apply in finding abandoned sites. It's not that there aren't many places to visit. No. They say it's about "protecting the locations from vandals". It's a pity, but I'm a supporter of this philosophy.

Nevertheless, I desire that beginners would have an easier time accessing the abandoned locations. There are three main ways to find them. Look around you, search the web and ask people. Let's take a look into these, and I'll give you some advice, I hope I knew when I was getting started in urban exploring.

guide-to-find-abandoned-houses-easier-than-you-might-think

Look around you - don't skip this one

This is an obvious one which has very little to it to master. Keep your mind open, eyes open and go out. Cycle around and use your judgement skills to determine if what you're seeing is abandoned (knock before you try to get in the house).

Finding abandoned places this way is fun and can be done without any extra effort. In a bus, watch out through the window, and when you are jogging, run through new areas.

Keep your mind open, eyes open and go out

guide-to-find-abandoned-houses-easier-than-you-might-think

Google, forums and maps - the hollow trio

Every country has its forums. If you find one which talks about urbex, take full advantage of it. Read and chat.

Google images are also handy. For example, search "abandoned New York", and you'll definitely see results. The hardest part is to find photos that give away their location. Search also with Youtube and Instagram. Some posts and images will include clues by which you can locate the abandoned site.

Google Maps is helpful in so many ways. You can check locations, search areas and even find new sites with it. With Maps' satellite image, you can look for building roofs that have holes in them.

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On Maps, you can mark up the locations you find.

On Maps, you can mark up the locations you find.

Ask for locations - become part of a urbex community

Your friends, family and relatives may know sites. Everybody knows at least one abandoned house.

If you find a neat abandoned house on Instagram, you can try to ask for its location. It helps if you have posted urbex photos for your instagram page. By that, you seem more trustworthy, and you may even trade locations.

Forums are a mighty place to chat with urbex enthusiasts. You can make new friends there and possibly exchange locations with them. The best is to get into a private urbex group chat, or even better, get your hands on a private urbex map.

Everybody knows at least one abandoned house

This is how I'd start urbexing

1. Find the first abandoned site

Ask friends, do a quick google search and look around. These are quick ways to get started.

2. Explore and photograph

Don't forget to take pictures. It's evidence that you are interested in urbex, and you aren't a vandal.

3. Gain trust and ask for more locations

You have visited a couple of sites and taken pictures of them. Now It's easier to ask for locations on forums and on Instagram. Upload your photos to your Instagram page and then try to DM for locations.

© 2022 Arttu Myyryläinen

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