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MariaDB vs. MySQL - Difference Between MariaDB and MySQL

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The author is a tech enthusiast and QA analyst who works at DevNami.

MariaDB Vs MySQL

MariaDB Vs MySQL

In this post, we will check some of the prime attributes of comparison between MariaDB vs. MySQL. Based on these points, you would be able to choose by choosing the correct database for the proper use case in the project.

Comparison between MariaDB and MySQL

MySQLMariaDB

Storage Engine

InnoDB

InnoDB

Price

Free & Premium

Free & Open Source

Database Type

Relational Database

Relational Database

Query Language

SQL

SQL

Authentication

Access Privilege & Encryption

Access Privilege & Encryption

Admin Tools

MySQL Workbench

3rd Party Tools

Backwards Compatible

NA

Yes (to MySQL)

Implementation Language

C and C++

C and C++

Open Source

Yes

Yes

License

GNU General Public License

GNU General Public License

Operating System

Windows, Mac, Linux & Others

Windows, Mac, Linux & Others

Native Network Encryption

SSL

SSL

Access Control System

Access Control List (ACL)

Access Control List (ACL)

Driver Access

JDBC, ODBC and ADO.NET

JDBC, ODBC and ADO.NET

Brute Force Protection

Yes

Yes

Security Certification

Yes

Yes

Replication

Master-Slave and Master-Master

Master-Slave and Master-Master

Performance

Good for Simple

Good for both Simple and Complex

Scaling

Limited for Open Source

No limitation for Open Source

UFT-8 Syntax support

Yes

Yes

Monitoring Tool

MySQL Workbench

SQLYog

Connection Pool

Limited for Free Version

200K+

Support

Free & Premium

Free and Less Premium Options

Privilege checks

Not so fast.

Faster than MySQL

Temporary Table Space

Not supported

Supported with encryption and log.

Premium Support

Yes. (Oracle and MySQL both support premium features)

External & 3rd Party

Data Masking

Not supported

Yes, Supported.

Page Compression

InnoDB supported

InnoDB supported

Analytics

Supported

Supported (columnstore)

Pros/Benefits of using MariaDB

MariaDB is a fork of MySQL that allows you to work with the backward compatibility of the database engine and its features. However, the feature updates take a lot longer, so for large enterprises, this may not always be a good option.

It is open source and has been forked out of the community edition of the MySQL database. It offers good performance and scaling at par with MySQL and similar databases.

There are, however, some issues with the MariaDB database.

  • It is hard to get premium support for the database.
  • The database engine is relatively new and may take much time to get updates.
  • Some parts of this fork still say it is MySQL, so the branding is still missing.

MySQL also has a lot of premium features available in the Enterprise edition. Those features are missing from the MariaDB too. You may notice that if this is the case, you will miss some significant features in the database.

JSON support in MariaDB is also not vis-a-vis comparable with MySQL, and you would have to fix some things to migrate away from MySQL to MariaDB.

MariaDB is also getting some premium features from external services, and it would not be open-sourced, so that is another limitation like oracle and MySQL databases.

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Pros/benefits of using MySQL Database

MySQL is one of the most popular databases out there in the market. It offers scalable performance and a reliable database—in both open source and premium offerings of its database services.

This is one of the highly available databases out there in the market. You would also find its performance a lot higher than most of the premium alternatives. It has proven to be a good database for web-based services and data warehouse usage.

It does not stop at that; you would find the database has a more secure design compared to other alternatives in the market. Another thing is that the system has multiple storage engine support too.

The enterprise edition of MySQL is known to support 200,000 and more active connections. Comparing this with many other premium database services like Oracle and SQL Server, you would find MySQL performing without compromising on features.

There are, however, some cons too. Some of them are explained below.
Migrating from MySQL is not an easy thing, as there are replication configurations that may get in the way. If you are migrating from Oracle to MySQL, it would not be easy as it will not be the case on a case basis applicable that easily.

MySQL also does not perform well in the case of Big Data use cases. In that case, the other choices where the analytics engines and predictive analytics database services are used with other NoSQL solutions are a much better.

This content reflects the personal opinions of the author. It is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and should not be substituted for impartial fact or advice in legal, political, or personal matters.

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