Updated date:

Lenovo 3000-C100 Dissembly

Computer technician with 15 years in the industry. I hold an A+ Certification, as well as a Bachelors of Science in Information Technology.

When I first started repairing this Lenovo 3000 c100 I knew little about how to get the case open. I found this Lenovo at an auction in my hometown and decided to take a chance on it. When I brought it home and set it up, I discovered that it had no hard drive installed upon first boot up.

Lenovo 3000 C100

lenovo-3000-c100-dissembly

Opening the case was challenging at first, but after some poking around I found hidden screws on each side of the stand.

Lenovo's are some pretty good pc's, they are well built and sometimes hard to dissemble which isn't a bad thing. However, it sometimes makes the technician's job a little bit harder but we eventually know how to get around this kind of issue. Then it could sometimes be as simple as watching a short video. There are millions upon millions of tutorials and info video throughout the internet.

Once you do remove the back case, the optical drive door and the back stand, you are then faced with a metal backing underneath that case. This metal backing holds about 5-6 screws, fairly easy to remove. It actually comes right off once the screws are removed. When you do get this removed, the mother is revealed, easy access to the RAM, hard drive as well. Quite thing I want to mention, if you have to install or extract a hard drive, there's a cable there that connects your USB ports to the motherboard and it needs to be disconnected prior to installing or extracting your hard drive. It's actually quite simple to remove, slide it out to disconnect and slide it back in to connect it.

This Lenovo has 1GB RAM installed but I think the memory is expandable to 2GB, it only has one RAM slot. It has an Intel Atom CPU and the sytem came installed with Windows XP

So when I got everything installed and put back together, this $29 AIO desktop booted up like a champ. I quickly inserted my USB stick with Windows 10 installation, set my boot sequence to USB and installed a fresh copy of Windows. It works just fine accept for one thing.

Immediately, I noticed that the little red x sat over my audio icon. Oh No! I have no audio. I was getting an error message that I had no audio output installed. I found out this is a false, negative. At this point, I removed the casing again, check the internal speaker connections and they seemed fine. I checked the speakers themself and they seemed fine. So, I'm not detecting that I have a hardware issue, so it has to be in the software.

Closed the computer back up again, booted it up and let Windows run it's diagnostics. Still stating that I had the output device installed. So I went to the device manager, click on update driver and Windows state that that I have the best driver. So I kind of decided to set this step aside for now until I run Windows updates, which I did. Installed updates and still did not straighten out the audio issue.

Low and behold, went to Google and did a search for Lenovo 3000 c100 audio drivers and it took me straight to the Lenovo site, smack dab to the exact driver I needed to download for the 32Bit version. It didn't matter that it was 32Bit cause I'm running a 64Bit machine. So a 32Bit is all that's needed to download Realtek audio drivers. Prior to this there was the High Definition audio driver installed. It took me only a few seconds to download the new drivers, about a minute to install, reboot my $29 computer and bam, the audio is fixed.

Now I think this 18 inch AIO $29 computer is operable and running pretty well. The one kickback is, it doesn't have too much speed, good for basic tasks but nothing too strenuous like streaming. This was a pretty good project that allowed me to work on something that I hadn't before. I keep this AIO in my office, it's nice to play around on when practicing or studying certain things that are computer related.

However, there are still many good uses for this computer model like, media center, low end games, internet browsing etc.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 ComputerCareClinic