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The Top Ten Movie Coats by Genre

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Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma Woodhouse

Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma Woodhouse

Top Ten Movie Coats

It is very much common knowledge at this point that costumes play a big part in expressing characters. They signify a character's personality, social status, moods alignments, and other facets. Which is great because so much of film is visual and having the character wear their characterization is an excellent means of storytelling.

Coats are yet another way for costume designers to express the character in an article of clothing. Coats, unlike a shirt or a dress can conceal or reveal much about the inner workings of characters. Like actually using it to hide or protecting them from some kind of external threat.

This page looks at The Top Ten Movie Coats as worn by ladies in films, sorry Indiana Jones and Han Solo.

The previous version of this page took a loose interpretation with regards to coats, as cloaks were allowed. This version is more strict. Basically a coat has sleeves and is worn for some layer of protection from the elements. Meaning a jacket-like garment that comes down to at least the waist is fine but items like the Spencer, a short coat popular in the Regency period are not considered. But having arms is a must. Basically outwear with sleeves is the theme of this ranked list.

This list is broken down by film type, or genre even though they are not technically genres. The sections are Period, meaning the film depicts a different time period from when the film came out, Fantasy/Sci-fi/horror everything supernatural or fantastical, and lastly modern meaning the film is set roughly when takes place. There are movies that have elements of multiple like a period fantasy so it can be based on the context of the film, the character, or even the garment itself where the costume is listed. Guidelines really. Also a quick side Fantasy and Period coats were harder to source that I thought.

Each section has ten coats so there are thirty in total.

These costumes were ranked on aesthetics, memorability and how they reflect the character.

List is subject to change

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Period Movies

Lady Gaga as Patrizia from House of Gucci

Lady Gaga as Patrizia from House of Gucci

Patrizia from House of Gucci

House of Gucci is a mobster movie just packaged in a fashion box. All the outfits in the film drip with early 1980s excess. One of Patrizia’s iconic looks from the film is a tan fur coat with a bright pop of red from her halter dress.

The coat has a loose fit and no fastening. It has a wide large lapel and is knee length.

All of Patrizia’s costumes as well as this coat showcase her large level of ambition and her desire for decantance, and power.

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Janty Yates did the costume design but sourced the garments from designers.



Vivien Leigh as Emma Lady Hamilton from That Hamilton Woman

Vivien Leigh as Emma Lady Hamilton from That Hamilton Woman

Emma Lady Hamilton from That Hamilton Woman

The 1941 film That Hamilton Woman tells the story of the love affair between British Naval hero Lord Horatio Nelson and Emma Lady Hamilton, wife of the British ambassador to Naples in the late 18th century.

In this scene, Emma Lady Hamilton, played by Vivien Leigh, boards Nelson’s battleship to deliver some news that will aid his mission to stop Napoleon in Egypt. This means that this scene takes place right before The Battle of The Nile which places it in 1798.

Emma wears a green long coat which is often called a Carrick Coat. Sometimes called a Garrick or Coachmen Coat it was used for riding or traveling. It is categorized by having three to five cape collars. Emma’s coat has three of these collars.

These coats were very popular in the 19th century which puts this a little early or Emma was a trend setter. Her coat also has a waistline which is positioned at the natural waistline which is also inaccurate for the time but it’s better for the film. It has large black buttons and large cuffs at the wrist.

This look suits the scene as being pragmatic for a battleship at night. She still looks feminine but in a slightly casual and militaristic manner.

Coat design by Marjorie Best


Maggie Cheung as Su Li-zhen from In the Mood for Love

Maggie Cheung as Su Li-zhen from In the Mood for Love

Su Li-zhen from In the Mood for Love

In the Mood for Love is a bittersweet love story about two neighbors who find solace in each other when they learn that their spouses are having an affair.

Su Li-zhen, played by Maggie Cheung, wears many glamorous cheongsams throughout the film. They sometimes blend into the surrounding and sometimes stand out to enhance her mental state. Though with regards to her simple red coat it can conceal a cheongsams that stands out in the space while the coat blends in highlighting her contradictions about being in that hotel room.

It is really just a simple red coat with a very sharp angled lapel collar but it very much works within the visual storytelling of the film.

Coat design by William Chang


Catherine Zeta-Jones as Velma Kelly from Chicago

Catherine Zeta-Jones as Velma Kelly from Chicago

Velma Kelly from Chicago

Chicago is one of those musicals that brilliantly weaves the musical numbers in the plot through hyper stylized scenes to draw a separation between the fantastical nature of the singing and dancing against the gritty “realism” that film goers seem to enjoy more, at least at the time.

During the trail scene, Velma, played by Catherine Zeta-Jones, wears a glamorous 20s style coat. It’s a loose fitting black coat with gray fur on the collar and it extends to the shoulders. There are three buttons that fasten at the hips, which is on point for the time period. The neckline is rather plunging which is more of an exaggeration but it does suit Velma’s cool cunning persona.

Coat design by Colleen Atwood



Gong Li as Hatsumono from Memoirs of a Geisha

Gong Li as Hatsumono from Memoirs of a Geisha

Hatsumono from Memoirs of a Geisha

Memories of a Geisha is a cinderella-type story set against the backdrop of the seemingly unknown inner-workings and daily lives of Geisha. The wicked step-mother-like character is Hatsumono, played by Gong Li, who is the star of the Geisha resident and rival for the protagonist, Sayuri.

On her way out for an evening Hatsumono dons a black coat over her Kimono. There are definitely traditional outerwear for Kimono and they do not look like Hatsumono’s coat. For one thing the traditional outerwear pieces are short. This one by contrast is long and is pure fantasy on the part of the costume designer.

With its length, an abstract pattern mixed with a fur collar the design mingles the kimono silhouette with a Western style women’s coat. The combo is strange, striking and very pretty which ultimately suits Hatsumono perfectly.

Coat design by Colleen Atwood


Mia Wasikowska as Edith Cushing from Crimson Peaks

Mia Wasikowska as Edith Cushing from Crimson Peaks

Edith Cushing from Crimson Peaks

Crimson Peaks is another movie that could be classified under Fantasy banner since it’s a horror with ghost but in the context of the film the “ghosts’ are a "metaphor” and the movie feels more akin to a gothic romance.

Edith, played by Mia Wasikowska, wears two traveling coats that are very similar to each as they have some shape with a large cape-like frill skirting and similar embroidery pattern. The pattern looks like an abstract butterfly which is evocative of Edith symbolism throughout the movie.

One of the coats is a lavender with fabric floral detail along the upper part of the cape with a scarlet velvet bow at the collar. She wears this coat arriving at Allerdale Hall. The other version of this coat is a pale blue with no other adornment for a teal velvet bow at the collar. She wears this when she and Thomas come from the depot after getting snowed in and Edith also arrives to an unhinged Lucille.

These coats are so very similar that it is a tie.

Coat design by Kate Hawley




 Barbra Streisand as Fanny Brice from Funny Girl

Barbra Streisand as Fanny Brice from Funny Girl

Fanny Brice from Funny Girl

When you hear the line ”Hello Gorgeous” you think of Barbra Streisand. She utters that line in Funny Girl, as Fanny, played by the aforementioned Barbra Streisand, walks in the theater wears this cheetah coat. It’s an iconic moment.

The coat has a high standing collar that is edged with a solid black and goes along the opening as well at the back. The rounded solid black detail at the back is at the hips and back along the neck. The length of the coat is knee length.

A matching hat very much completes this look.

The coat and hat shape do make this look more 1960s than Edwardian but it is so iconic.

Coat design by Irene Sharaff


Kate Winslet as Rose Dewitt Bukater from Titanic

Kate Winslet as Rose Dewitt Bukater from Titanic

Rose Dewitt Bukater from Titanic

As the Titanic sinks into the frigid depth, the passengers are told to wear warm coats and other articles against the elements. Rose, played by Kate Winslet, puts on a very pretty coat though she does not look very warm.

Commonly referred to as the Sink coat, the production made it in a larger size than Kate Winslet wore in order to make her look vulnerable.

Many copies of the coat were made for the production as the coat had to get wet. Once the filming wrapped, the coats were sold. Tuck Everlasting, a movie from 2002, got one of the coats and modified it to be double-breasted. So one coat design, two movies. For the sake of this we’ll just look at Titanic.

The coat is made from a light pink wool. It has a large lapel collar with black abstract scroll pattern. The cuffs have the same embroidery pattern. There are three black buttons at both sides of the front that she never fastens in fact she abandons the coat not long after putting it on.

Coat design by Deborah L Scott


Alexis Bledel as Winnie Foster from Tuck Everlasting in the modified Sink Coat.

Alexis Bledel as Winnie Foster from Tuck Everlasting in the modified Sink Coat.

Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma Woodhouse

Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma Woodhouse

Emma Woodhouse from the 2020 version

The 2020 adaptation of Emma had amazing costumes that captured a side of Regency fashion we don’t often see in films. Typically Regency looks are very soft, muted and pastels in their colors and Emma went with bold strong colors.

One look that was used in the film’s promotion was a bright yellow pelisse that Emma, played by Anya Taylor-Joy, wears to a shop and walking with Harriet. Like many of the costumes from this version the design of the pelisse was lifted from a fashion plate from the period.

This Pelisse is made from a bright yellow fabric that has a slight texture. There is a double row of shank buttons at the front of the bodice. The bodice has three darts on either side and a long thin tie comes to bow at the high waist. The sleeves have a capped over-sleeve at the upper part with a small ruffle in between the layers. The cuffs are long and there is a button tab detail at the seam.

The collar is higher in the back and the back is pleated in the back with a button tab much like at the cuff.

It’s a very striking bold color which suits Emma’s handsome, clever, and rich character.

Coat design by Alexandra Byrne


Kate Hudson as Penny Lane from Almost Famous

Kate Hudson as Penny Lane from Almost Famous

Penny Lane from Almost Famous

The world of fashion and costume often influence each other. You will have period costumes reflecting the times the movie came out in and you will see a garment from the past catch on with modern audiences, The coat from Almost Famous is an example of the latter. As this style of coat became popular in the early 2000s

Penny Lane, played by Kate Hudson, is a veteran groupie character who cares more for music than the rockers themselves. She is more like a muse. Her signature look is an Afghan coat.

The Afghan Coat began the trademark coat of Hippies in the west in the later part of the 1960s. However it is based on traditional outwear from Afghanistan.

Penny’s coat is made from brown suede and lined with white shaggy fur that makes up a wide collar. The bottom has a double ruffle and there is a floral motif pattern on the coat in a lighter tan.

The coat gives her a cool otherworldly vibe which works for rocker muse persona.

Coat design by Betsy Heimann


Fantasy Movies

 Louise Bourgoin as Adèle Blanc-Sec  from The Extraordinary Adventures of  Adèle Blanc-Sec

Louise Bourgoin as Adèle Blanc-Sec from The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec

Based on the comics of the same name, the film adaptation of The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec is akin to mixing Indian Jones with Amelie.

Protagonist, the titular Adèle Blanc-Sec, played by Louise Bourgoin, is a no nonsense adventurer/reporter/author. She is on a quest that takes her to Egypt in the hopes of reviving an ancient mummy. Things go awry, as they so often do, and she must deal with a revived pterodactyl who is flying over Paris that has recently hatched from an egg in The Louvre.

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec is an example of the Gaslamp fantasy subgenre. It is very similar to Steampunk but less super-scientific or alternate history focused. Same type of setting which is either Victorian or Edwardian but more mystical magic. The setting of the film is very securely set in 1912.

For the climax of the film, which sees Adèle riding the pterodactyl as well conversing with the revived mummy and more, Adèle wears a long green coat. It is fairly simple as it has minimal decoration. The lapel and cuff are made from a lighter green color that looks like a velvet with very simple stitching details. The closures are blackish buttons and the same buttons are on the cuffs too. The back has slit up the center back and has a tab detail at the waist of the back.

This coat was used for the film’s promotion.

Coat design by Olivier Bériot


Julie Andrews as Mary Poppins

Julie Andrews as Mary Poppins

Mary Poppins

Sure, It’s a basic black coat but when it's a singing magical practically perfect nanny descending from the clouds is wearing it the coat becomes part of the iconic look of Mary Poppins.

Mary Poppins, played by Julie Andrews, is a beloved icon and her look while very simple is very well known. The basic utilitarian coat is the perfect anchoring point for her more whimsical accessories such as her knitted pink tone scarf, hat, and her umbrella. It also anchors her no nonsense personality as the perfect nanny.

It maybe not be the most interesting coat but it works so well to establish Mary Poppin’s look and icon factor.

Coat design by Tom Walton, Chuck Keehne, Gertrude Casey, & Bill Thomas


Christina Ricci as Penelope Whilern from Penelope

Christina Ricci as Penelope Whilern from Penelope

Penelope Whilern from Penelope

The 2006 movie, Penelope is a modern fairy tale story about a generational family curse, self-discovery and self-love.

Penelope, played by Christina Ricci, is a rich girl from a wealthy family who is cursed with a pig nose. To break the curse she must find love from “one of her own kind.”

The look of the costume and especially the coat has a shabby-chic aesthetic. Her coat is dark purple with a slight wave texture pattern. Set against the dark tone of the purple is bright red trim at the opening of the collar and at the seams. The coat is long and has some volume toward the bottom and the hem is higher in the front than the back. All the buttons mismatch adding to the DIY shabby chic look.

The sleeves have a long angler cut. The lining of the coat is a black and white floral print.

She pairs the look with a geometric green and purple scarf which hides her cursed face, green leather gloves along with green tights and shoes.

It’s a whimsical yet modern look which fits the tone of Penelope the movie and the character.

Coat design by Jill Taylor


Mila Kunis as Theodora from from Oz the Great and Powerful

Mila Kunis as Theodora from from Oz the Great and Powerful

Theodora from from Oz the Great and Powerful

Oz the Great and Powerful is a prequel film based on the novels by L. Frank Baum and the 1939 movie classic The Wizard of Oz. It’s an origin story of Oz and how the Wicked Witch came to be.

The Wicked Witch of the West of the 1939 movie starts off as Theodora, played by Mila Kunis. Theodora is a beautiful, naive, good person with a hidden undercurrent of wickedness though she believes herself to be good and wants peace. When she first meets Oz she wears a ruby red coat with a wide brim matching hat that has a long white feather. Fun Fact this hat transforms into the iconic Wicked Witch hat later the film.

The coat has a wide lapel and cuffs. On either side of the lapel there are three horn toggle buttons sewn and two on each of the cuffs. There is also a toggle horn as closure at the front though she leaves the coat open. The back has pleated fan details.

There is no one period of inspiration to her look which adds to the sense of fantasy and the red color pops against the green of the emerald city.


Coat design by Gary Jones and Michael Kutsche


Emilia Clarke as Qi’ra from Solo: A Star Wars Story

Emilia Clarke as Qi’ra from Solo: A Star Wars Story

Qi’ra from Solo: A Star Wars Story

While Solo: A Star Wars Story doesn’t have the over the top grandeur of costume design of the Prequel trilogy nor the iconic factor of the original, on the whole the costumes are ok. The overall design goes for the more pragmatic look that recent Star Wars works tend to lean into. Pragmatic doesn’t always mean boring though.

As part of the back story of the Kessel Run, Qi’ra, played by Emilia Clarke, wears this short coat. The totality of Kessel Run makes up a good chunk of the film so you do see the coat in many scenes though Qi’ra pairs some accessory like a fur stole and a cape over the coat.

The coat is short just coming to the hip and is made from a light beige leather. To give a bold punch all the details are all black save for a red tab square at the hem. The choice to make the details black mirrors her dynamic of bad/good character within the narrative

The Sleeves have pleating detail on the undersides. The pleat detail is seen a lot with Star Wars coats. There is also a black gusset at the underarm which is for movement but the black adds some interest and works with the overall look instead of just picking a color that would have blended into the body of the coat. There is black piping on the sleeves as well on the collar. Collar is wide and is lined in a black fur-like fabric. There are toggles for adjusting the fit.

It's a cool and bold look for a character that is more morally ambiguous.

Coat design by David Crossman & Glyn Dillion


Alison Sudol as Queenie Goldstein from Fantastic Beasts and where to find them

Alison Sudol as Queenie Goldstein from Fantastic Beasts and where to find them

Queenie Goldstein from Fantastic Beasts and where to find them

Fantastic Beasts and where to find them is the first film in the Wizarding world Franchise which set its stage in New York in the 1920s.

Queenie, played by Alison Sudol, is a good natured bombshell-type character who in addition to being a seductive coquette type and being more outwardly feminine than her sister, Tina. Queenie is clever as she is a powerful mind reader who uses this skill to charm people and to her advantage when she needs.

She wears this pink wool coat at the very end of the movie when she appears at Kowalski's bakery and her smiles are her. It has a slightly darker pink velvet lapel and a matching hat. The coat is fastens low at the hips with a single button.

It’s a very lovely and bright coat that makes for just such an upbeat ending.

She also wears another pink coat that has a silvery sheen to the fabric and the same darker pink velvet fabric making up the collar. She wears this coat when she helps everyone escape in Newt’s case.

Coat design by Colleen Atwood


Emily Browning as Violet Baudelaire from Lemony Snicket’s a Series of Unfortunate Events

Emily Browning as Violet Baudelaire from Lemony Snicket’s a Series of Unfortunate Events

Violet Baudelaire from Lemony Snicket’s a Series of Unfortunate Events

The film adaptation of Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events was released in 2004. It adapted the first three books in the series. Unfortunately the film series based on the other book never came to fruition but in 2017 Netflix released a show adaptation of the books.

The 2004 movie set out to have a timeless and sophisticated aesthetic especially with the design of the costumes which does help to add a layer of fantasy to the looks.

Violet Baudelaire, played by Emily Browning, who is the eldest, wears this coat when the Baudelaire children meet Aunt Josephine. The coat looks like it is made from a mute light blue wool. The sleeves have a slight puff at the shoulder giving them a leg-o-mutton look.

The closure are tabs with a button and give off a militaristic look. The closures are only at the upper portion of the coats. The collar is proportionally larger and has black insert fabric.

There are also some interesting darts or seams that make up a triangular look at the side fronts, which gives this seemingly simple look coat more complexity.

Coat design by Colleen Atwood

This coat was repurposed for Alice in the live-action movie, which were also designed by Atwood.


Lily James as Lizzie Bennet  from Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Lily James as Lizzie Bennet from Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Lizzie Bennet from Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

This adaptation based on the novel adaptation of Austen’ classic mixes the polite gentility of the Regency period and slasher action of Zombie movie. The of the juxtaposition of the two makes for some great comedy.

The version sees Lizzie, played by Lily James, and the other Bennet girls as trained zombie slashers who addition to destroying Zombie must acquire proper matches. One of Lizzies's most iconic looks from the movie is her blue pelisse which is also her battle costume at the climax of the film.

It’s a dark muted blue color with a double row of buttons as closure at the center front. The collar is rather feminine as it has a swirl floral pattern in the same blue tones. This provides a lovely contrast against the action scene.

The sleeves have a button detail and a long slit up the cuff.

With the neckline and the waistline both being straight across this gives the impression of a square which makes the pelisse look powerful which is just what Lizzie needs.

Also her plum pelisse with the black leather lapel is great too.

Coat design by Julian Day


Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games

Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games

Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games

When we first meet Katniss, played by Jennifer Lawrence, in the first film installment of the franchise she is being deviant as she is hunting. This is one of the few times in the film series that she wears garments that are not part of a facade or battle grab, this first look of her’s is her at her most genuine.

As Katniss first look is her being true to herself this makes this brown leather coat very memorable. It’s a very simple coat but it suits Katniss' strong and power-to-earth personality. Leather is also soft which suit her strength and compassionate nature.

This coat does show in other scenes in the franchise as well.

Also shout-out to Katniss’ asymmetrical black coat from Catching Fire and her teal puffy disguise robe from Mockingjay Part 2.

Coat design by Judiana Makosky


Carrie-Anne Moss as Trinity from The Matrix

Carrie-Anne Moss as Trinity from The Matrix

Trinity from The Matrix

It is not an exaggeration to state that The Matrix changed the film landscape. Even if you haven’t seen the movie you know the shots, the effects, the quotes, and the overall vibe and style. It is just one of those movies.

In keeping with the look of the movie Trinity, played by Carrie-Anne Moss, is the picture of minimal sci-fi- effortlessly cool.

Trinity’s iconic look is a black pleather trench coat. It just oozes sci-fi cool. Aside from the shiny futuristic fabric the coat is sparse on details adding to the vibe. You don’t get much more iconic film coats than this.

Coat design by Kym Barrett


Modern Movies

Ingrid Bergman as Ilsa Lund from Casablanca

Ingrid Bergman as Ilsa Lund from Casablanca

Ilsa Lund from Casablanca

While the costumes of Casablanca are not the most ornate and ostentatious they are smart and iconic.

This goes for Ilsa’s coat which she wears in one of the most iconic film scenes ever. At the end Rick tells Ilsa, played by Ingrid Bergman, to get on the plane without him. It’s one of those scenes that you know even if you haven’t seen the movie, you know it, it’s just ingrained in the collective film memory.

It is hard to know the exact color but most likely it was a tan brown color. The fabric has a weave texture. The same fabric covers the large buttons. An angular lapel with exposed pockets make up the rest of the details.

She pairs it with a matching skirt, white blouse and hat.

Coat design by Orry-Kel


Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s

It’s not hard to understand that Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly has one of the most chic looks in movies. Everything she wears in this movie is on point.

Holly wears this coat when she walks with Paul down Fifth Ave, to Tiffany’s, to the library and other places.

Her red coat is peak 1960s chic. The collar is high standing with four buttons as the closure and it is double breasted. The sleeves are ¾ in length. The waistline is cinched in ever so slightly, just hinting at a waistline. The hem is knee length.

To add to the cool factor it paired with sunglasses and a hat.

Shout out to Holly's white coat.

Coat design by Givenchy

Jane Russelll as Dorothy Shaw from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Jane Russelll as Dorothy Shaw from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Dorothy Shaw from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Gentlemen Prefers Blondes is a misleading title. The film is really a buddy comedy about two friends of opposing viewpoints about what they look for in relationships. The more romantic one wants to know that she is financially secure and the no-nonsense seemingly pragmatic one goes after guys for their looks, a reversal but makes sense in the context of the film.

Dorothy Shaw, played by Jane Russell, is the sarcastic wise-cracking pragmatic foil to Lorelei’s diamond loving ways. Her style perfectly reflects her cool demeanor.

She wears this loose trapeze cut coat when she finds Lorelei trying to find Dorothy a wealthy escort to dinner on the ship. The coat has a black and white check pattern that is offset with a bright yellow lining. The hemline comes to about the hips. It also has large cuffs, a thick black broader at the edge and notched collar. Underneath she wears black halter jumpsuit with silver jewelry.

The look is effortless, chic, yet fun, bold and pretty timeless.

Coat design by Travilla


Elizabeth Taylor as Gloria Wandrous from BUtterfield 8

Elizabeth Taylor as Gloria Wandrous from BUtterfield 8

Gloria Wandrous from BUtterfield 8

In BUtterfield 8, Elizabeth Taylor plays Gloria, a ‘party girl’ with loose morals who engages in two love triangles.

After spending a night with a married man, Gloria is left feeling insulted as her dress is torn and the man left her some money. She slips on a coat before making her ire known on a mirror with lipstick.

The coat is light beige with ¾ length sleeves, loose fit and no closures. The most dramatic thing is the oversized white and tan fur collar. Its large-scale grandeur gives her a scene of dominance in the setting.

Coat design by Helen Rose


Alicia Silverstone as Cher from Clueless

Alicia Silverstone as Cher from Clueless

Cher from Clueless

At the start of Clueless, Cher, played by Alicia Silverstone, wears a lot of plaid as a kind of unofficial school uniform that reflects her desire to appear perfect in the eyes of her classmates.

Cher is briefly seen wearing this cute plaid coat when she is applauded for the improvements to the student-body's grades as a result of her setting up two of her teachers.

The plaid is black and red and possibly made from wool. The hem is at the waist which is a nice contrast as she wears it with a mini-skirt, as is a standard part of most of her school looks along with black thigh socks. The coat looks to be double breasted and has black buttons as the closure.

To match with the black she wears a black beret with it adding to preppy sophisticated looks that she curates for herself.

Coat design by Mona May


Donna Summers as Tracy Chambers  from Mahogany

Donna Summers as Tracy Chambers from Mahogany

Tracy Chambers from Mahogany

Mahogany is one of those movies that is more remembered for its fashion than for anything else. The story is cinderella-type tale about Tracy Chambers played by Diana Ross, who is an aspiring fashion designer turned model called Mahogany. While there are many examples of over-the-top looks in this movie there are also some very chic seventy looks.

As she is looking at her magazine cover, Mahogany wears this bright white trench coat. It’s very minimal, it has just basic details like straps at the shoulders as well as the cuffs, exposed breast pockets, a collar lapel, belt with white buttons. The length hits at the knee.

She wears a matching hat with it. To give the coat a bold and exciting yet very chic look she wears a black turtleneck shirt underneath with black boots, gloves and purse. Not to mention the black ribbon on her hat.

Coat design by Diana Ross


Anne Hathaway as Andy Sachs  from The Devil wears Prada

Anne Hathaway as Andy Sachs from The Devil wears Prada

Andy Sachs from The Devil wears Prada

As Andy, played by Anne Hathaway, is learning the fashion ropes of her job at Runway, she experiments with different looks during a montage sequence. A lot of the looks she wears in the montage are coats as she is on route to work.

Though it is only shown for a brief moment the white coat she wears during the montage is emblematic of Andy's style preference as she aligns herself as Chanel girl.

The coat is a white, possibly wool, trench. It is very streamline as only the waist belt serves as a closure, though there could be hooks and eyes or some inside closure since there doesn’t appear to be any gapping. It also has no lapel or collar. The princess seam gives a close fit.

She pairs it with a gray hat and half gloves.

The look just looks impeccable and very chic.

Shout out to the green coat with the leopard trim.

Coat design by Patricia Field


Gwyneth Paltrow as Margot Tenenbaums from The Royal Tenenbaums

Gwyneth Paltrow as Margot Tenenbaums from The Royal Tenenbaums

Margot Tenenbaums from The Royal Tenenbaums

The Royal Tenenbaums is a Wes Anderson film about a deeply dysfunctional family. A family where the children were all very brilliant in adolescence only to become disappointing adults.

Margot, played by Gwyneth Paltrow, is the middle child, the only female and was adopted. She was a successful playwright by the time she was in ninth grade.

Throughout the movie wears a tan mink fur coat. This is her signature look. Despite being made from a material that is perceived to denote luxury, the coat has little embellishments. Just a collar and tie. It’s no-frills, to the point yet polished aesthetic suits Margot’s secretive yet beautiful artist personality.

Coat design by Karen Patch and made by Fendi


Jennifer Lopez as Marisa Ventura from Maid in Manhattan

Jennifer Lopez as Marisa Ventura from Maid in Manhattan

Marisa Ventura from Maid in Manhattan

Maid in Manhattan is a modern Cinderella tale about a hotel maid, Marisa, played by Jennifer Lopez who falls in love with senatorial candidate Chris. The first time Chris sees Marisa she is wearing a Dolce & Gabbana white coat that is slated to be returned. She wears it when the go for a walk in the park.

The coat looks to be made from wool. The hem comes down to the mid-thigh. It is double breasted with black buttons adding contrast.

It’s a simple coat but looks so elegant and relaxed, especially styled with white wide legged pants and turtleneck.

Coat design by Dolce & Gabbana

Meryl Streep as Miranda Priestly from The Devil wears Prada

Meryl Streep as Miranda Priestly from The Devil wears Prada

Miranda Priestly from The Devil Wears Prada

If there is a garment in The Devil Wears Prada that is in excess it’s coats, especially for Miranda who has a literal montage of different coats that she throws at her assistant Andy.

There are a lot of gorgeous coats in this movie, most of which were borrowed by a friend of the costume designer, however it’s the coat that Miranda, played by Meryl Streep wears in her introductory scene that is her most memorable and menacing thus suiting her persona.

The idea is that the chaotic and panic as Miranda comes into the office is a daily occurrence. As her panicked employees rush around to make everything perfect for their exacting boss arrival, Miranda strolls into the building in a black coat with fur elements. The black color denotes power and authority while the fur and what looks like velvet confers luxury, wealth and excess.

The coat has bell sleeves which are one of the elements of black fur. These sleeves add drama. Another fur element is the high necked collar. The color does make it harder to see details but the coat appears to be single breasted with black buttons. There are also fur puffs on thin ties which look like they hang off the button from the holes and they tie together. These fur elements can be seen when you see the Prada handbag. The hem is knee length and has some fullness.

And just to add to Miranda’s persona of power she wears a purple dress underneath it, purple is a color often associated with royalty and authority.

This is definitely a coat that shows off power and prestige and adds in the introductory to this character.

Coat design by Patricia Field


This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2014 RiverCygnet

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