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'The Devil Is a Liar' vs. 'Get Thee Hence, Satan!'

Rev. Margaret Minnicks is an ordained Bible teacher. She writes many articles that are Bible lessons.

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You have probably heard people say in the Christian community, "The devil is a liar." Admit it..You have probably said it yourself. My plea to you is don't say it again. Here's why.

According to John 8:44, "When he speaketh a lie, he speaketh of his own: for he is a liar, and the father of it." This proves that the Bible does say the devil is a liar. However, people quote this scripture out of context. Besides, they say, "The devil is a liar" because they hear others saying it without knowing the scriptures surrounding the one they quote part of.

When you say, "The devil is a liar," you are absolutely correct. However, you are merely making a statement ABOUT the devil. There is no direct address because you are not talking TO the devil and commanding him to do something. Therefore, the devil has every right not to respond and to ignore you.

Say What Jesus Said

Jesus did it the right way. He spoke TO Satan and not ABOUT him. Jesus called Satan by name and gave him a direct command. Speaking about the devil has no power. Speaking to the devil is what moves him to respond.

Jesus said with authority, "Get thee hence, Satan" (Matthew 4:10) and "Get thee behind me, Satan!" (Matthew 16:23). In these two scriptures, Jesus called Satan by name and gave him a direct command.

We have that same authority, but we do not use it. Instead, some people say what they hear other people saying. Believe it or not, I have NEVER yelled out "The devil is a liar! I could, but I know it has no power.

We should do it the exact same way that Jesus did. We should talk directly to the devil and not about him. We should use our authority to call him by his name and command him to "Get thee hence, Satan!" or "Get behind me, Satan!" Since we know it worked for Jesus, we can rest assured that it will work for us as well.

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Matthew 4:10

Jesus was emphatic, He did not beat around the bush. He spoke with authority. In Matthew 4:10, the devil had transported Jesus to the top of a high mountain and offered him control of the world if he agreed to worship him. Jesus had good reasons to reject Satan's temptation just as He had rejected two previous ones.

The entire story is found in Matthew 4:1-10. Jesus had just come off of a forty-day fast and was hungry. Satan tempted Him by offering to turn stones into bread. Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.'" Jesus rejected Satan's first temptation, but Satan did not give up. He tempted Him a second time by telling Jesus to jump from the highest point of the temple in the holy city. Again, Jesus said, “It is also written: ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.'"

The devil tired a third time and took Jesus to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and promised to give it all to Jesus if Jesus would bow down to him. The kingdoms of the world were not Satan's to give.

That's when Jesus said in the King James Version, "Get this hence, Satan (Matthew 4:10). Then the devil left him and angels came and attended to him.

You must say the same thing and Satan will leave you, and the angels will come and minister to you.

the-devil-is-a-liar-vs-get-thee-hence-satan

Matthew 16:23

In Matthew 16:23, Jesus again spoke directly to Satan and commanded him to go away. This time the situation was a little different. Jesus spoke to the devil that was within Peter. "But he turned, and said unto Peter, 'Get thee behind me, Satan!' The sternness of Jesus' words indicates His authority with strong and intense emotion.

Jesus did not call Peter Satan. Peter was part of Jesus' inner circle along with James and John. Instead, Jesus rebuked the devil who had a hold on Peter at that particular time. Peter thought he was protecting Jesus when Jesus was explaining to the disciples that He must suffer on the cross.

Let's Rightly Divide the Two Scriptures

Jesus said in Matthew 4:10, "Get thee hence, Satan:" "Get thee hence" is a command. "Hence" is not a word used in everyday language. It means "away from this place at this time." Notice the direct address. Jesus specifically said, "Satan."

Jesus said in Matthew 16:23, "Get behind me, Satan!." "Get behind me" is a command. Again, Jesus directly addressed Satan.

So, what's wrong with saying, "The devil is a liar." Nothing if you don't want results. Everything if you want immediate results for Satan to leave your presence.

[I was watching Greenleaf on OWN while writing this article. Lynn Whitfield. who plays Lady Mae Greenleaf, read something on her phone that upset her. She yelled, "The devil is a liar!" and threw her cellphone into a mirror. She broke the mirror and her phone.] She made a statement as most people do. There was no command and no direct address. So, what did she accomplish?

Comments

Cheryl E Preston from Roanoke on September 11, 2019:

This is excellent. Another phrase is that the devil is under our feet.

Margaret Minnicks (author) from Richmond, VA on September 11, 2019:

Thanks, Tim, for your usual reading and commenting. Sometimes when I write an article as I see it, I don't know how it will be received by others. I try to explain it scripturally so people won't think I am making this stuff up.

It was so amazing to hear the character on the show say exactly what I was writing at the same time I was writing it. It proved my point that people do say, "The devil is a liar!" without doing it the way Jesus did.

Again, many thanks!

Tim Truzy from U.S.A. on September 11, 2019:

This is a great article, Margaret. It's important to rebuke Satan by name. Curiously enough, I point out to Christians who blurt: "The devil is a liar!" without rebuking him, you are actually giving him power and credit. In doing this slip, as happened with the character on tv, the devil makes you pay in some way. (The Character became angry, threw the phone--essentially loosing the calmness brought by God and a valuable communications device. The character paid in two ways through lost communications.) In doing so, the devil actually was truthful: his goal is to separate us from God and those who can be loving on Earth.

Great article. Admiration.