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Revelation: Beasts, Heads, and Horns

Pastor of Iglesia Conexiones, a baptist church in Jessup, MD. B.A. in Bible, B.S. English Ed., M.S. in Educational Leadership.

The Whore of Babylon Dresses The Part

In the book of Revelation, we find a great red dragon (Rev. 12), a beast from the sea (Rev. 13), and a scarlet beast (Rev. 17), each of which has seven heads and ten horns.

However, each of these beasts is different from the other. The dragon also has seven diadems; the beast from the sea looks like a leopard with the feet of a bear and the mouth of a lion, and blasphemous names on it; and, the scarlet beast bears a woman over it.

Moreover, the dragon represents Satan (Revelation 12:9), the beast from the sea represents Nero (Revelation 12:18), and the scarlet beast represents a future king (Revelation 17:11).

If the three beasts have different details about them, and if they also represent different individuals, why then do they all have seven heads and ten horns?

To answer this question, we need to look at Revelation 17:10-12. These verses explain to us that the seven heads of the scarlet beast represent seven kings (and seven mountains), and that the ten horns represent ten kings. Can we, then, say that the heads and the horns of the beast from the sea and the red dragon mean the same thing? I believe we can.

Even though the red dragon, the beast from the sea, and the scarlet beast appear to point to different individuals, their heads all represent Roman emperors, and their horns all represent future kings. The same meaning is what gives unity to the visions.

In my article Who Are The Seven Kings in Revelation 17?, I explain what emperors are represented by the heads, and I also explain that the scarlet beast itself represents a future Antichrist.

In my article Revelation 13: The Beasts from The Sea and The Earth, I explain that the beast of the sea actually represents, not one man, but two: both Nero and the Antichrist.

In my article The Woman, The Dragon, and The Child, I explain that the dragon not only represents Satan, but also Herod the Great.

Because the Roman emperors, Nero, and Herod the Great are all Roman figures, it makes sense that the heads of each beast all represent the same Roman emperors, and that the horns (by extension) all represent the same future kings.

The diadems on the dragon’s heads appear to be there specifically to stress the fact that these heads represent “kings,” or emperors.

Moreover, the description of the beast of the sea (like a leopard, bear, and lion) appears to be there specifically to point the reader to Daniel’s beasts (specifically, the fourth beast, the one that represents the Roman Empire).

Finally, the alternate interpretation of the heads of the scarlet beast as seven mountains (and the woman on them as the great city) also points the reader to Rome.

Thus, Rome is the instrument that Satan used to persecute God’s people in the past, and the confederacy between the future Antichrist and the ten future kings is the instrument that Satan will use to persecute God’s people in the future.

In my article Who Are the Seven Kings in Revelation 17?, I also explain how the ten horns Daniel’s fourth beast (which, once again, represents the Roman empire) corresponds to the seven heads of the scarlet beast.

In conclusion, it is my perspective that Daniel’s fourth beast represents the Roman Empire; its ten horns, the ten Roman rulers who preceded Vespasian (Pompey, Julius Casesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Caludius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius); its little horn, Vespasian (although Titus destroyed Jerusalem, he did so as a general of Emperor Vespasian ).

Similarly, the seven heads of the beasts from Revelation, represent Roman emperors, but from Augustus to Titus (see Who Are The Seven Kings in Revelation 17? for an explanation).

The scarlet beast itself represents the future Antichrist. The beast from the sea represents both Nero and the Antichrist. And the dragon represents both Satan and Herod the Great. All of these, however, are somehow related to Rome.

© 2021 Marcelo Carcach

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