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It Is Against the Law to Be Homeless or To Help Homeless People In the USA! The Meanest Cities In the United States

Ms. Clark hopes to help bring better understanding and an end to hurtful, downright wrong stereotypes about poverty and homelessness.

Be Aware

Warning! There are some very graphic photos posted in this article.

Just a Few of the Mean Cities In the USA

Cities all across the USA are making it against the law to be poor, and even against the law to help poor people!  This is the mini-list of those cities.

Cities all across the USA are making it against the law to be poor, and even against the law to help poor people! This is the mini-list of those cities.

James Kelley -- 9-Year Navy Veteran

James Kelley, 9-year Navy veteran, now homeless, being fined $500 for taking a partially eaten donut from a dumpster in Houston Texas.

James Kelley, 9-year Navy veteran, now homeless, being fined $500 for taking a partially eaten donut from a dumpster in Houston Texas.

Randall Kallinen, Civil Rights Attorney in Houston Texas

At the podium (center), Randall Kallinen is a Civil Rights Attorney in Houston Texas and has for years fought against laws that make the lives of homeless people even harder than they already are. He currently represents James Kelley pro bono

At the podium (center), Randall Kallinen is a Civil Rights Attorney in Houston Texas and has for years fought against laws that make the lives of homeless people even harder than they already are. He currently represents James Kelley pro bono

Mayor Annise Parker of Houston Texas

Mayor Annise Parker of Houston Texas who voted for and was instrumental in passing laws that outlaw homeless people in Houston so as to make the city more appealing to people of quality.

Mayor Annise Parker of Houston Texas who voted for and was instrumental in passing laws that outlaw homeless people in Houston so as to make the city more appealing to people of quality.

In the course of researching for this article to see if I could determine what city in these United States was the most hateful and mean towards those unfortunate people who are down on their luck, or who may never have had good luck to begin with, I discovered many different lists of “Meanest Cities in America.” Apparently the U.S. has become so mean that it takes several lists to contain the names of all the cities where mean laws against homeless and poor people have been passed.

According to dailykos.com, the Houston city counsel passed a law in 2012 making it against the law for anyone to give food to a homeless person, whether that homeless person was in a park or in a food kitchen set up specifically to feed the homeless people of Houston.

The same law made it illegal for homeless people to feed themselves with found food (usually from the trash). Dailykos reported that a homeless man was ticketed a week before they published their story on this subject and fined $500 for taking a partially eaten donut out of a dumpster. Five hundred dollars is the amount of the fine for persons who feed the homeless, or for the homeless who feed themselves inside the Houston city limits – the City Counsel lowered the fine down from $2,000 because of public outcry.

Randall Kallinen is a Houston attorney who has for years fought against laws that make the lives of homeless people even harder than they already are. Kellinen has taken the case, pro bono, of the 9-year navy veteran, James Kelley, who was charged with taking a partially eaten donut from a dumpster on March 7th, 2014.

Pro bono is an abbreviation of pro bono publico, meaning for the good of the people. Many people are not aware that most lawyers do some pro bono work, representing poor people at no charge. Kallinen says the city of Houston has taken a “hostile” stand against the homeless for many years.

A few members of the Houston City Counsel voted against ticketing and fining people for feeding the homeless or for the homeless feeding themselves, but for the law to pass the majority of counsel members obviously voted for the measure (vote was 11-6), as did the mayor, according to record.

There was a huge public outcry over the law that made even soup kitchens located within the Houston city limits against the law. However, not enough people in Houston had sufficient compassion for the less fortunate to keep the law from passing. Even those who did get involved lost their ‘heart’ for fighting it when the going got tough and so that law is on the books with a somewhat reduced fine attached.

‘“Civil libertarians, volunteer groups and religious leaders were opposed . . . saying the law "criminalized charity,”’ (Chron.com).


The Proud Houston City Council That Made It Against the Law For Food Kitchens or Anyone at All to Help Poor People Inside the City Limits of Houston

2014 photo of the Houston City Council with Mayor Annice Parker center in red jacket and pearls. These administrators have outlawed poor people from within the Houston city limits and likewise, charities or people from giving poor people food.

2014 photo of the Houston City Council with Mayor Annice Parker center in red jacket and pearls. These administrators have outlawed poor people from within the Houston city limits and likewise, charities or people from giving poor people food.

Noah’s Kitchen in Houston Texas Forced to Move Outside the Houston City Limits

Noah's Kitchen Executive Director Amber Rodriguez told The Christian Post that there are 13 and a half thousand homeless people in Houston and that the $500 fine would feed at least 750 people (Christianpost.com).

It was necessary for Noah’s Kitchen (as well as other charity groups that help the poor) to move outside the Houston city limits or pay the $500 fine every single time they offered a homeless person a cup of soup or a piece of toast. Yes, $500 for each and every offense. A second piece of toast to the