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Which American Demographic Is the Most Racist?

Social issues can only be remedied by a collective acceptance of those opinions we view as opposing our own.

There is no room for any form of racism in the United States if we also want a bright and equitable future for everyone.

There is no room for any form of racism in the United States if we also want a bright and equitable future for everyone.

Racism is—and probably always will be—a hot topic here in the United States of America; it's a topic I don't see leaving the forum of public discussion any time in the foreseeable future. Not only is it one of the most hotly debated topics, it is the most divisive topic to be discussing by its own nature. That being said, it is worth discussing in a myriad of different contexts, and I set out to get answers to a question that has been burning in the back of my mind for quite some time.

The question I set out to get answers to was, "Which American demographic is the most racist, if any one demographic can be labelled as such?"

Before I share with you the answers I received to that question, I want to explain how I went about obtaining the answers I received. I used a vast array of multicultural, multiracial, and overall open and honest individuals who aren't afraid to seem racist when expressing controversial views.

How I Obtained the Data for This Article

I've never been a big fan of formality as it concerns sociopolitics and social issues, so when asking which American demographic is the most racist I refused to touch on things like hate crimes, racial violence, and other empirical statistics from agencies that monitor such information. Though that information is important, the subjective perceptions of those in your community are more pressing than any statistic will ever be. After all, those in your immediate community are the ones who have an immediate effect on your life.

When going about my data collection for this article, I asked individuals who self-identified within specific races to answer a series of questions. These questions were developed in order to offer people a fair chance to defend their opinions on racism and race. The questions I asked every participant were as follows:

  1. What is your race?
  2. What is your birth gender?
  3. What is your age?
  4. Do you feel racism is a problem in America?
  5. Are there races that you feel are more racist than others, and if so please explain?
  6. Have you ever been labeled as racist by someone else, or self-identify as racist?
  7. Is racism in America increasing, or decreasing?
  8. What, in your opinion, is the solution to racism in America?
  9. If you had to choose, which American demographic do you feel is the most racist, or presents the biggest problems as it concerns racism?

These nine questions were asked to participants in both private and public settings of their choice, and recorded by myself in audio and written format. Each participant agreed to have their identity made anonymous for their safety, and any identifying information has been altered or removed so as to avoid any personal conflicts. Even further, I took the information and processed it down to a more concise presentation, and based upon the responses from each individual within each racial demographic I answered each question in a generalized, but fair way according to the data collected.

Races Involved in the Data Collection Process

It was surprisingly difficult to pinpoint the races of individuals within my community due to my rule that they had to self-identify what their race is. Many individuals struggled with being multiracial, and none of them had actually thought to narrow it down to something that resembled where their ancestry hailed from, and/or what their skin color was perceived as being. I received a lot of answers that were along the lines of, "Well, I'm a Mexican, European, African American," and so I had to narrow down the options to something more simple.

The races involved in the data collection process for finding out which American demographic is the most racist are as follows:

  • White/Caucasian/European
  • African American/African/Black
  • Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American
  • Asian American/Asian
  • Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean
  • Non-white/Unspecified/Prefer not to answer

At first I had thought it might be interesting to let everyone identify with multiple races, but I quickly found that almost everyone identified as more than one race. White and Asian-identifiers were the only ones who did not identify as multiple races as often as everyone else, which was surprising in and of itself. However, for the sake of simplicity, and to get a clearer picture for racial demographics, I kept it simple and took the answers from one-hundred individuals of each self-identifying racial group.

Without further ado, let's explore my general findings for which American demographic is the most racist.

The general findings for each question really fascinated me.

The general findings for each question really fascinated me.

General Findings Combining Each Demographic Into One

When trying to find a concrete answer for which American demographic is most racist, I was surprised to find that almost everyone was on the exact same page. The majority of my participants answered so similarly to one another—regardless of their race—that I was actually able to form a general consensus across all races and genders. For the sake of transparency, though, I'll break down the answers I received where applicable later on, but for now I'll list my general findings.

When I asked the question, "Do you feel racism is a problem in America?" the overwhelming majority stated that it is.

"Are there races that you feel are more racist than others in America?" received a blend of non-answers, but the most common races mentioned were White, Black, and Asian variants.

Every person questioned said that they have been labeled by someone else as being racist when offered more context such as discussions on social media, memes, and indirect accusations. All individuals interviewed identified as non-racist until read the definitions of racism from Merriam Webster's dictionary, at which point there was a majority shift to admitting they are racist in some way, shape, or form.

Each individual involved said that racism in America was increasing, and when questioned further as to whether or not it was measurable in their own community the majority said that it was.

The responses as they concerned solutions to racism in America were too broad to form a general opinion, however, strictly regulating American media was repeated more often among participants than any other solution.

Finally, the general consensus on which American demographic is the most racist was found to be overwhelmingly perceived as White-identifiers being the most racist demographic.

Before you rush to any conclusions about the findings listed in this section, keep in mind that these are the general findings. These findings are not representative of the actual complexity of each individual's personal opinions, and are generalized so as to give an idea of common perceptions among the different racial demographics in America. Now that we have the general findings out of the way, it is time to break down the findings within each racial demographic.

The first group of individuals I questioned were White-identifiers.

The first group of individuals I questioned were White-identifiers.

The White/Caucasian/European Findings

The overall ranking for the most racist American demographic that my White/Caucasian/European participants chose is as follows:

  1. African American/African/Black
  2. White/Caucasian/European
  3. Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean
  4. Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American

Of the one-hundred White-identifying participants in my search for the answer to which American demographic is the most racist, sixty-seven were females, and thirty-four were males. Their ages ranged from eighteen to sixty-four years of age.

In the White-identifying female demographic, thirteen of them stated that White people are the most racist, thirty-two of the individuals said it was African American/Black, two said it was Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean , and twenty participants refused to specify.

In the White-identifying male demographic, seven stated that White people are the most racist, twenty-three stated African American/Black, one stated Hispanic/Latino, and three refused to specify.

The second group of individuals I questioned were Black-identifiers.

The second group of individuals I questioned were Black-identifiers.

The African American/African/Black Findings

The overall ranking for the most racist American demographic that my African American/African/Black participants chose is as follows:

  1. White/Caucasian/European
  2. Asian American/Asian
  3. Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean
  4. Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American

Of the one-hundred Black-identifying participants in my search for the answer to which American demographic is the most racist, forty-five were females, and fifty-five were male. Their ages ranged from eighteen to eighty-seven years of age.

In the Black-identifying female demographic, nineteen said that White people are the most racist, seven stated Asian, ten stated Indian/Middle Eastern, six stated Hispanic/Latino, and three refused to specify.

In the Black-identifying male demographic, fifty-one said that White people are the most racist, and four stated it is Asian American/Asian.

Hispanic/Latino-identifiers were the third group of individuals I questioned.

Hispanic/Latino-identifiers were the third group of individuals I questioned.

The Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American Findings

The overall ranking for the most racist American demographic that my Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American participants chose is as follows:

  1. African American/African/Black
  2. White/Caucasian/European
  3. Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American
  4. Asian American/Asian

Of the one-hundred Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American participants in my search for the answer to which American demographic is the most racist, fifty were female, and fifty were male. Their ages ranged from eighteen to seventy years of age.

In the Hispanic/Latino-identifying female demographic, twenty-seven said African American/Black people are the most racist, nine said it is White, eleven said Hispanic/Latino, and three said Asian American/Asian.

In the Hispanic/Latino-identifying male demographic, twenty-three said African American/Black people are the most racist, thirteen said it is White, six said Hispanic/Latino, five said Asian, and three refused to specify.

Asian American/Asian-identifiers were the fourth group of individuals I questioned.

Asian American/Asian-identifiers were the fourth group of individuals I questioned.

The Asian American/Asian Findings

The overall ranking for the most racist American demographic that my Asian American/Asian participants chose is as follows:

  1. White/Caucasian/European
  2. Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean
  3. African American/African/Black
  4. Asian American/Asian

Of the one-hundred Asian American/Asian participants in my search for the answer to which American demographic is the most racist, forty-seven were female, and fifty-three were male. Their ages ranged from eighteen to forty-three years of age.

In the Asian American/Asian-identifying female demographic, thirty stated that White people are the most racist, nine said Asian American/Asian, seven said African American/Black, and one refused to specify.

In the Asian American/Asian-identifying male demographic, twenty-four stated that Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean people are the most racist, nineteen said White, seven said African American/Black, and three said Asian American/Asian.

The sixth group of individuals I questioned were Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean-identifiers.

The sixth group of individuals I questioned were Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean-identifiers.

The Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean Findings

The overall ranking for the most racist American demographic that my Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean participants chose is as follows:

  1. White/Caucasian/European
  2. African American/African/Black

Of the one-hundred Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean participants in my search for the answer to which American demographic is the most racist, seventy-four were female, and twenty-six were male. Their ages ranged from twenty-six to fifty-nine.

In the Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean-identifying female demographic, sixty-two said White people are the most racist, and twelve refused to specify.

In the Indian/Middle Eastern/Mediterranean-identifying male demographic, twenty said that White people are the most racist, five said African American/Black, and one refused to specify.

Those who refused to specify their race were questioned at unspecified intervals, and tallied last due to how many there were.

Those who refused to specify their race were questioned at unspecified intervals, and tallied last due to how many there were.

The Non-White/Unspecified/Prefer Not to Answer Findings

The overall ranking for the most racist American demographic that my Non-white/Unspecified/Prefer not to answer participants chose is as follows:

  1. White/Caucasian/European
  2. Asian American/Asian
  3. African American/African/Black
  4. Hispanic/Latino/Mexican/South American

Of the three-hundred-forty-seven Non-White/Unspecified/Prefer not to answer participants in my search for the answer to which American demographic is the most racist, I chose one-hundred responses at random, thirty-seven were female, and sixty-three were male. The ages ranged from eighteen to thirty-nine.

In the Non-White/Unspecified/Prefer not to answer-identifying female demographic, twenty-two said White people are the most racist, seven said Asian American/Asian, four said African American/Black, two said Hispanic/Latino, and two refused to specify.

In the Non-White/Unspecified/Prefer not to answer-identifying male demographic, thirty-six said White people are the most racist, twenty said Asian American/Asian, six said African American/African/Black, and one said Hispanic/Latino.

Diversity is what the future looks like, so let's work towards bringing racism in all of its forms to an end.

Diversity is what the future looks like, so let's work towards bringing racism in all of its forms to an end.

Author's Conclusions

After listening to and reading all of the wonderful answers I received during my endeavor to find an all-encompassing answer to which demographic in America is the most racist, I can say with confidence that diversity is the future. I can say with just as much confidence that the majority believes that White/Caucasian/European people are the most racist demographic in America. It makes sense to me, as well, that this is the conclusion that was made during my search.

Higher-privileged White-identifying individuals, by all appearances, tend to want to make race a focus in almost every single facet of society. Whether you be discussing the inconsequential makeup of their friends, or the all-important topic of racial identity, racism is at the forefront of every privileged white-identifier's narrative. This was a major commonality between the majority of my participants when we began to discuss why they answered the way they did.

Almost every single participant who answered that white people are the most racist said that it wasn't their immediate community members who were the root of such opinions, it is the influencers, politicians, CEOs, and other individuals of privilege and stature. Unfortunately, though, the majority also claimed that these feelings and perceptions bleed onto everyone around them as a result.

Nonetheless, I didn't find any of these answers nor the conclusions formed utilizing them to be disheartening, because every individual who participated simply wants the use of race—the race baiting—to come to an end. People in America do not tend to see the world by race, but by the actions of the individuals around them until someone of power, influence, and/or privilege points out race as an issue. I'm finding more hope for the future within the communities I take part, because I now see that the vitriol is being driven by forces outside of my communities, and those forces of evil can be resisted.

Won't you join me and the communities resisting racist narratives and racism-driven agendas, and do so knowing that race need not be a dividing factor in the world?

This content reflects the personal opinions of the author. It is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and should not be substituted for impartial fact or advice in legal, political, or personal matters.

© 2021 Kyler J Falk

Comments

Kyler J Falk (author) from California on July 21, 2021:

@Mike: I actually did a test run where I asked what defines a person as racist, and the answers I received either did not make sense, were extremely general and unfair, or were blatantly racist themselves. It would appear that most people cannot actually define what racism is in the literal sense, and instead opt for calling anything that involves two or more races a situation that racism encompasses. The answers didn't feel relevant, so I changed the question to the one we see in #6, and that proved to be a more-fair question as far as getting clear answers were concerned.

I'm surprised you haven't brought up being called racist simply for your skin color, an occurrence I've seen increase all throughout my own life both directly and indirectly. Within my own life, I've often found that white people rarely accused anyone of racism, and I can't recall a single time when myself nor a white-identifying figure in my life actually called someone who wasn't white a racist. That is to say, I didn't witness this sort of accusation up until the Trayvon Martin trial, but after that everyone loaded their hypothetical cannons with ordinance made of accusations of racism; these accusations increased even more during and after last summers riots and protests.

When even the literal definitions of racism favor a specific race, there can be no question as to why racism is increasing. The powers that be seem to want this division sown among the masses, much like what Ken said in his last comment. It'll take more than a few calm and cool heads to quell the growing threat of racism in the world, and in America where we cannot limit even much of the racist speech of others we have our work cut out for us.

Kyler J Falk (author) from California on July 21, 2021:

@Ken: I tend to agree with everything you just said, and it is that exclusionary enforcement that I think motivates growing sentiments of a civil war being in our future. Though Mr. Happy did not comment here directly, he had emailed me to make a request for an article that I think will cover that very same sentiment you just shared. "Invasive culture," is the general label I use for the unfair interference of authority and influencing figures, and the subsequent common behaviors that arise from it.

Even if it comes to violence, I like to believe that the majority of Americans will do what is right. Unfortunately, that usually takes a long period of upheaval, or an atrocity to truly bring Americans together, but at the end of the day we will stop the backwards influence of authoritative figures one way or another.

Readmikenow on July 21, 2021:

Very well done article.

I wonder what would have happened if you were to ask what defines a person as a racist?

I've been call a racist because I don't like basketball, don't support the idea of reoperations, and don't believe in affirmative action, which I think is racist. Here's the thing, my friend who is black is the same way. Is he being racist against himself? He's been called many names by other blacks because he is a very financially successful black man. There have been those white liberals who have told him he is not black. Is that racist?

It's to the point where people are called racist if they disagree with you. If you don't like something they think you should. Many times, being called a racist has nothing at all to do with race.

Ken Burgess from Florida on July 21, 2021:

Kyler I believe you see laws written and unwritten but being upheld by major corporations like Facebook, Google, etc. being changed currently to "disbar anything that can be construed racist"...

The problem with that, these laws and written and unwritten new standards to combat racism are exclusionary and only protect what is considered a 'minority'... this creates a reality where any 'minority' criticized by a 'majority' can result in that 'majority' person being labeled racist, but even the most extreme acts of the 'minority' against the 'majority' will not be labeled so.

The result will not be where racism is removed from society, nor will it be where the 'minority' gain power and control over the 'majority', though that may initially be what appears to occur, what eventually you will have is an increased counter reaction by the majority to the increased enforcement of the efforts to "disbar anything that can be construed as racist".

It may very well result in the type of extremism and violence we have seen wherever a population has been oppressed, whether that be the Irish, the Palestinians, or whomever you look back to... technology will not counter this, though I am sure those running Google, Facebook and the Alphabet Agencies in DC think so.

Kyler J Falk (author) from California on July 20, 2021:

An even more interesting statement made by you yourself, Sankhajit, because racism isn't anything more than a social faux pas in most contexts. There are no real legal consequences for an individual who is simply a racist, but hate crimes are crimes that is to be certain. An important question to ask, as well, given the literal definitions of racism should it be a crime to be racist?

How would you legally punish someone if they were found to be racist, and what would be the different levels for severity of their racism? Should laws that protect racist, or possible racist acts be rewritten to disbar anything that can be construed as racist?

A simple statement has created a very important line of thought on the topic of racism for me.

Sankhajit Bhattacharjee from MILWAUKEE on July 20, 2021:

interesting fact...racism is a crime...

Kyler J Falk (author) from California on July 20, 2021:

Misbah, you may just be right, and unfortunately I also believe in that sentiment, racism is an unstoppable force. Fortunately, though, I also believe that love and acceptance together make an immovable object to put in front of racism. You've already offered a wonderful quote, and I'll offer one in contrast that I believe encompasses the stance most people take on solving issues:

"I do not have to forgive my enemies, I have had them all shot."-- Ramón Maria Narváez

Though I feel there is always a proper place and time for the relevant tactic of force, while addressing racism or racial issues just isn't one of those times. Now is the time to understand those that we would rather disdain.

Thank you for adding value with your comment, and thank you even further for reading!

Misbah Sheikh from The World of Poets on July 20, 2021:

Racism, I believe, is unstoppable. I appreciate your efforts, Kyler. We can try to eradicate racism, but I believe it has such deep roots that no one will be able to do so. It is a global problem and It must come to an end.

The problem is that we all want to stop it, but none of us are prepared to do so or are not allowed to do so, just my opinion.

"We look forward to the time when the power to love will replace the love of power. Then will our world know the blessings of peace."-- William Ellery Channing

I appreciate your efforts very much :)

Stay safe and healthy

Blessings always

Kyler J Falk (author) from California on July 20, 2021:

I've always found that people are much more comfortable with those minority groups that are easily identifiable, and there is actually much less violence when all groups can essentially conjoin or segregate at will. Choice, the freedom to choose who to associate and share with, seems to be one of the biggest influencers of hostile and/or welcoming feelings toward minority groups. There is no better group I can find for example than Israelis and Palestinians.

Israel and Palestine are consistently committing what any first world countries would call hate crimes, and we support the ones who continue to abuse their position of power to the detriment of the world as a whole, but specifically those they are oppressing. It is different in other areas, though violence is still prevalent, where two similar cultures (Sunni and Shia) give each other a proper breadth to function equally but separate. Perhaps still a terrible example, but I'm trying to think in extremes where unclear lines must be addressed for the sake of the communities as a whole.

I've lost my train of thought, but I think I was trying to compare and contrast the extreme examples to what we would experience here in America. In America you have the Black v. White narrative taking the forefront, but we all seem to function just fine when those who want to segregate themselves are free to do so, and those who want to blend are not judged harshly. Issues arise only when people are forced to adhere, rather than held to a simple expectation of properly expressing and practicing their views.

CHRIS57 from Northern Germany on July 20, 2021:

Interesting article and survey.

In response to Ken´s comment:

... Being THE minority has its issues... wherever one goes in the world... Yes, certainly true, but only if the minority membership is easily identifyable..

Kyler J Falk (author) from California on July 20, 2021:

Racism seems existent to different extremes everywhere in the world, Ken, yes. I would consider America to be in the top ten best countries to live as it concerns a lack of real, violent racism, because the things I have seen in other countries would shake the core of American spirit if it were widely observable by the public at large, and I'm sure you could say the same. I am still under the assumption, though, that is the perception of invasive culture more than it is the skin color itself that influences racism in all its forms; the Chinese government loves foreign interests, it makes them tons of money, but they hate divergent cultures to the point of violent suppression should they catch wind of their influence.

Thanks for coming by and adding to the value of the article, Ken, and thank you for reading!

Ken Burgess from Florida on July 20, 2021:

Go to China, tell me does racism exist there?

Go to Zimbabwe, tell me does racism exist there?

Do you consider America better or worse, its all about perspective.

Being THE minority has its issues... wherever one goes in the world.

Kyler J Falk (author) from California on July 20, 2021:

@MG: I tend to agree with the notion that the darker someone's skin is, the greater the discrimination they face. As for your friend who threatened to shoot the man, I think we all have friends that share that same feeling about their daughters. However, those same people who would threaten to take a life never seem to actually be upset about the skin color of the person, but the culture and lifestyle that skin color could be said to represent.

I have a friend from India, we will call him Waqas, whose father was the same way about him marrying a poor white girl. He would often attack her skin color and the way she dressed, and it was because it was readily observable where everything else was an assumption. When getting him alone, though, he'd admit that it was actually the separation in identity and culture from his traditional values that he hated most, and he wouldn't actually mind if his son married a white woman who wasn't so flagrantly "liberal" for lack of a better term.

I have an article in waiting about the perception of skin color versus the roots of most people's opinions, but like this one I wanted to take hundreds of opinions into account before writing it. It is my hypothesis that it is a culture/lifestyle clash that upsets the majority of those who would otherwise be considered racist, and typically I see nothing wrong with disfavoring invasive, objectively regressive cultures (drug culture is a good example). Unfortunately, most people do not like to have the negative aspects of their culture/lifestyle looked down upon by others, and thus we breed spiteful vitriol.

Race will always be an absolutely fascinating topic, and I'm thankful for your thoughtful comment that added to the value of my article.

MG Singh emge from Singapore on July 19, 2021:

You have done a lot of research in collecting these figures. Good, you have shared them but one point that goes beyond these figures is the psyche of the racial divide. How do you take it away? I will relate a small example. I have a close American friend who was always talking of discrimination against the black man but when his daughter expressed a desire to marry a black, he threatened to shoot the man dead and he was a veteran and could have carried out the threat.The color of the skin has some bearing as the darker you are the greater the discrimination. Anyway, these are just thoughts and nothing else.

Sankhajit Bhattacharjee from MILWAUKEE on July 19, 2021:

valuable post...I engoyed.

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