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The Most Insane Accidents Humans have Survived

The 30-pills overdose

The 30-pills overdose

On March 18th, 1944 Koivunen’s unit was attacked by Russian soldiers while out on patrol one night after three days of roaming the area around Kaitatunuri Hill. The opposing army surrounded them and shots were exchanged, but he and a couple other men were able to escape into the wilderness by breaking through a fence. Koivunen, still on skis, led the pack through the thick, fresh snow for a few hours as the group tried to avoid the opposing army and make their way back to base. He grew fatigued and decided to take a Pervitin pill to keep himself going instead of resting and risking being caught and killed. He was able to retrieve the bottle from his breast pocket, but failed to grasp a single pill. Koivunen became frustrated and upended the entirety of the pill bottle into his mitten before dumping them from his hand into his mouth and swallowing. There were 30 pills in the bottle. Despite the risk of overdose, Koivunen did not die from ingesting such a large amount of methamphetamine. Soon after taking the pills, he became energetic and was able to continue moving until he entered into a state of delirium. His vision became blurred and he collapsed. When he awoke alone in the snowy forest, he only had some water and his rifle on him. He had been half buried in the snow, just enough to hide him from any passing Soviet soldiers without him freezing.

For several days Koivunen remained in a state of delirium. He experienced hallucinations and could not sleep. Koivunen was afraid of being caught by the Russians and taken prisoner or killed. He decided to try to traverse the wilderness in hopes of finding help. However, his luck did not improve. Koivunen accidentally set off a landmine. He was seriously injured and remained stuck in a ditch for almost a week afterward, but the explosion had been muffled by the thick snow. When he was finally able to continue on in the -4 degree weather, he remembered that he had not eaten in over a week. He gathered pinecones to sustain himself. On one occasion, he was able to catch a Siberian Jay and ate it, raw. Siberian Jays are notoriously fearless when they come into contact with humans. They are still respected for their curiosity and are known as the “Hunter’s Friend”. Killing one of these birds was said to bring bad luck.

Koivunen again ran into Soviet troops, but was able to elude them due to his still completely jacked up state. Finally, he crossed Finnish lines and waited to be rescued. Koivunen was found two weeks after first setting out on patrol. He was 250 miles from where his group was attacked by the Germans. He was immediately transported to a nearby hospital and doctors were astonished to find that his pulse rate was 200 beats per minute. After surviving on pinecones and one raw bluejay for two weeks, Koivunen’s weight had plummeted to just under 95 pounds. Despite all predictions and odds, Koivunen made a full recovery.

Some doctors who treated Koivunen believe that the Pervitin overdose actually saved his life. He likely would have been unable to withstand the harsh temperatures and two weeks without real food without the drugs. Koivunen died in 1989 at the age of 71.

The Marine Who Absorbed the enemy’s Grenade Blast -Terry Terhune

One does not have to go further than the story of CPL Kyle Carpenter, USMC (Ret), the Marine Corps infantryman was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroism in Marjah, Afghanistan on Nov. 21, 2010, when he jumped on an enemy grenade and absorbed a blast, saving the life of another Marine.

Carpenter's Medal of Honor citation Read: "Without hesitation, and with complete disregard for his own safety, Lance Corporal Carpenter moved toward the grenade in an attempt to shield his fellow Marine from the deadly blast. When the grenade detonated, his body absorbed the brunt of the blast, severely wounding him, but saving the life of his fellow Marine.

The enemy grenade exploded tearing flesh and bone from Lance Corporal Kyle Carpenter’s face. The body armor he wore offered some protection for his torso, but the exploding grenade left entry and exit wounds in his skull, shredded his face, severed major arteries, splintered his right arm, collapsed a lung, and left him hemorrhaging beneath a plume of grey smoke. His arm was so shattered that the Corpsman felt as though he was splinting a wet rag. Carpenter’s right eye had nearly fallen out its socket. The corpsman inserted a tube through Carpenter’s nostril hoping it would help him breath but it didn’t. When the Corpsman removed the tubing, Carpenter sprayed teeth, flesh, blood, and mucus from his nose. He was trying to speak, but his tongue seemed to be searching for the rest of his jaw. He was asking, “Am I going to die?” The Marines on the triage team began reminding Kyle of stories he had told them about life at home. The more they talked about his family, the more stable he became. Aboard the helicopter, the medics triaged Carpenter’s wounds.

Upon arrival at Camp Bastion, Carpenter’s admission code was given as “P.E.A.,” the acronym for Patient Expired upon Arrival. However, Carpenter wasn’t P.E.A. at all.

Neurosurgeons removed shrapnel from Carpenter’s brain. Vascular surgeons repaired his veins and arteries. Torn flesh was stretched and sutured; nothing cosmetic that could wait. Stopping blood loss and preserving tissue was more important. Carpenter was wrapped in pressure dressings and stiffened with splints. The medical team’s goal was to get him stable enough to fly to Germany and then to the United States. The medical staff at Walter Reed could rebuild him. He just needed to stay alive until he got there.

After two days in Germany, Carpenter was wheeled aboard a U.S. Air Force C-17 transport airplane to the US. Orthopedic surgeons repaired his bones and his soft tissue. Other surgeons applied and repaired skin grafts. Carpenter was treated with leeches to control blood pooling under the skin. Because Carpenter’s head had borne the brunt of the blast, dirt and debris were embedded in his face referred to the damage as “mud tattoos.” It would take months of reconstructive surgery and laser treatment to remove it all. The medical team focused on small successes as a way of boosting morale. Carpenter himself lived in “a haze of drugs.”

Next, there was Carpenter’s facial reconstruction. Because of the array of injuries to Carpenter’s face, the medical team relied on a variety of imaging technologies, including magnetic resonance and 3D spiral multi-slice. The scarring and missing tissue and bone meant that the skin on Kyle’s face had to be stretched before acrylic teeth could be implanted into his mouth. Mold after mold was made and refined. In the operating room, the medical staff kept a picture of Carpenter before his injuries. He and his team were determined to give him back his smile.

On June 19, 2014, William “Kyle” Carpenter was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Obama. Carpenter was with his family, his friends, his squad, and nearly all of his medical team.

CPL Kyle Carpenter’s action by jumping on a live grenade in combat in Afghanistan and surviving is the most insane thing any human has survived.


The 30-pills overdose

On March 18th, 1944 Koivunen’s unit was attacked by Russian soldiers while out on patrol one night after three days of roaming the area around Kaitatunuri Hill. The opposing army surrounded them and shots were exchanged, but he and a couple other men were able to escape into the wilderness by breaking through a fence. Koivunen, still on skis, led the pack through the thick, fresh snow for a few hours as the group tried to avoid the opposing army and make their way back to base. He grew fatigued and decided to take a Pervitin pill to keep himself going instead of resting and risking being caught and killed. He was able to retrieve the bottle from his breast pocket, but failed to grasp a single pill. Koivunen became frustrated and upended the entirety of the pill bottle into his mitten before dumping them from his hand into his mouth and swallowing. There were 30 pills in the bottle. Despite the risk of overdose, Koivunen did not die from ingesting such a large amount of methamphetamine. Soon after taking the pills, he became energetic and was able to continue moving until he entered into a state of delirium. His vision became blurred and he collapsed. When he awoke alone in the snowy forest, he only had some water and his rifle on him. He had been half buried in the snow, just enough to hide him from any passing Soviet soldiers without him freezing.

For several days Koivunen remained in a state of delirium. He experienced hallucinations and could not sleep. Koivunen was afraid of being caught by the Russians and taken prisoner or killed. He decided to try to traverse the wilderness in hopes of finding help. However, his luck did not improve. Koivunen accidentally set off a landmine. He was seriously injured and remained stuck in a ditch for almost a week afterward, but the explosion had been muffled by the thick snow. When he was finally able to continue on in the -4 degree weather, he remembered that he had not eaten in over a week. He gathered pinecones to sustain himself. On one occasion, he was able to catch a Siberian Jay and ate it, raw. Siberian Jays are notoriously fearless when they come into contact with humans. They are still respected for their curiosity and are known as the “Hunter’s Friend”. Killing one of these birds was said to bring bad luck.

Koivunen again ran into Soviet troops, but was able to elude them due to his still completely jacked up state. Finally, he crossed Finnish lines and waited to be rescued. Koivunen was found two weeks after first setting out on patrol. He was 250 miles from where his group was attacked by the Germans. He was immediately transported to a nearby hospital and doctors were astonished to find that his pulse rate was 200 beats per minute. After surviving on pinecones and one raw bluejay for two weeks, Koivunen’s weight had plummeted to just under 95 pounds. Despite all predictions and odds, Koivunen made a full recovery.

Some doctors who treated Koivunen believe that the Pervitin overdose actually saved his life. He likely would have been unable to withstand the harsh temperatures and two weeks without real food without the drugs. Koivunen died in 1989 at the age of 71.

Vulović who survived a 33,300-foot fall

There is a Serbian flight attendant named Vesna Vulović who survived a 33,300-foot fall out of a plane after terrorists detonated a bomb that tore the craft apart in the skies over Czechoslovakia in 1972.

Eight months into her flight attendant career, Vesna Vulović was told to join the crew of JAT Flight 367, flying from Stockholm to Belgrade with a stopover in Copenhagen.

JAT Airways had confused her with another attendant named Vesna, but she agreed to join the flight crew, as she had never been to Denmark (Copenhagen), she considered it an opportunity to travel.

There was a 24-hour stopover for the crew at Copenhagen & at 1:30 p.m. on January 26 1972, the crew met Flight 367 at the Copenhagen Airport and watched as the passengers and previous crew deplaned.

The new passengers boarded and the flight ultimately took off at 3:15 p.m.

At 4:01 p.m., 46 minutes into the fight, there was an explosion in the baggage compartment. The aircraft broke apart in mid-air before falling 33,330 feet down to the ground in Srbská Kamenice, Czechoslovakia.

On the evening of January 26, 1972, Bruno Honke heard screaming coming from a hillside just outside of his village in Czechoslovakia.

As he went to investigate, he saw the wreckage of an airplane, torn apart by an explosion.

Though it seemed impossible that anyone could have survived such a crash, Bruno Honke realized that amid the wreckage was a woman wearing a bloodstained turquoise flight attendant’s uniform and no shoes & she was breathing.

Fortunately, Bruno Honke, the villager who discovered her, had been a medic during World War II and was able to keep her alive until rescuers arrived.

Later on Bruno Honke came to know the survivor was known as Vesna Vulović and although she didn’t know it yet, she had just survived an epic fall of 33,330 feet in what is one of the strangest world records: surviving the highest fall without a parachute.

From the crash, Vesna Vulović had sustained two broken legs, three broken vertebrae, a fractured pelvis, broken ribs, and a fractured skull.

After being taken to a hospital in Prague, Vesna Vulović spent several days in a coma recovering.

In addition to her extensive bodily injuries and her fractured skull, her brain had also hemorrhaged and she had total amnesia.

She remembered greeting passengers for the flight, and since then Vesna Vulović had no memories, until she saw her parents in her hospital room and remembered them.

10 months after her fall, Vesna Vulović was walking again. The first thing she did upon waking was ask for a cigarette.

Her recovery period was relatively short & incredibly successful. She remained an avid flyer and died in 2016 at the age of 66.

This man survived the two atomic bombs of WWII. (Hiroshima and Nagasaki)

The story of Engineer Tsutomu Yamaguchi is sad, yet amazing for anybody who knows at least a gist of the twin bombs that destroyed two cities during WWII. This man survived the two atomic bombs of WWII. (Hiroshima and Nagasaki)

How did this happen?

Well, after working long hours for weeks, Yamaguchi decided to go to Hiroshima to see his family on 6th August. But on that day, something unplanned happened.

He arrived just in time to meet the devastating nuke that hit Hiroshima that day.

Burned and injured Yamaguchi arrived at the hospital via train on August 8th where he was treated. His old friend who was part of the medical team didn’t recognize him in that burned condition and neither did his family members.

On August 9th he took out himself for a meeting in his Mitsubishi company to report what happened at Hiroshima. But his boss didn't believe the story of how a man could survive a single bomb that destroyed a whole city.

And after some time, another flash appeared and boom! One more nuke and miraculously, our protagonist survived it once again.

Engineer Tsutomu Yamaguchi died aged 93, in TOKYO, Jan. 6, 2010.

She was frozen alive, and then brought back to life

There have been a number of great instances of unbelievable survivals in this list, but the case of a Swedish radiologist, Anna Bagenholm appears to be so strangely amazing.

She was frozen alive, and then brought back to life. She is a survivor of probably one of the worst cases of hypothermia, and officially set the record for the lowest human body temperature ever recorded.

In 1999, Anna was on a skiing trip with her friends along a trail in Narvik, Norway, as was her daily routine after work.

While attempting to maneuver around a nearly frozen waterfall, she fell headfirst into a hole in the ice and got stuck with only her feet protruding from the water. Her friends attempted to help her out of the hole, but the ice-cold stream took her even deeper into the freezing ice. Because of that, her friends decided to call an emergency rescue team. But luckily for her, she found an air pocket between the water and the ice and that kept her for 40 minutes

By the time the rescue team assisted her out of the stream, she had been submerged for 80 minutes total. Bagenholm's temperature had dropped down to what was at the time the lowest recorded (about 56.6 degrees Fahrenheit and 13.7 degrees Celsius), her pupils were dilated, and her heart had stopped beating. The emergency team tried to give her CPR, but they failed. For a short time, she was dead.

Dr. Mads Gilbert, an anesthesiologist who worked at the hospital, believed the subzero temperatures actually helped. To quote: “Her body had time to cool down completely before the heart stopped. Her brain was so cold when the heart stopped that the brain cells needed very little oxygen, so the brain could survive for quite a prolonged time.”

Anna survived the accident.

Fortunately, she suffered no visible brain damage. But she had to pay a price for surviving that accident — the damage it did to her nerves made it more difficult for her to use her hands when it came to writing and cooking, for example. At least she was still able to go skiing.

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