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South African Culture, Customs And Practices Writ Large: Re-Morphed Cultural Renaissance Against Dysfunctional Existence

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Young men from the Ndebele nation in South Africa pose for a photo during their initiation day

Young men from the Ndebele nation in South Africa pose for a photo during their initiation day

Mapunbwe Hill, whose material culture and customs and traditions within South African African Historiography should be grouped with the South African Negroid spectrum of peoples.

Mapunbwe Hill, whose material culture and customs and traditions within South African African Historiography should be grouped with the South African Negroid spectrum of peoples.

Both Zulu men and women do dance together and here they are in full flight

Both Zulu men and women do dance together and here they are in full flight

When Zulu women get married, they cover their bodies completely to let other know that she has a husband

When Zulu women get married, they cover their bodies completely to let other know that she has a husband

When they are engaged, they cover their breasts with decorative beaded-clothing

When they are engaged, they cover their breasts with decorative beaded-clothing

Zulu Boy and Girl

Zulu Boy and Girl

King Moshoeshoe I of the Basotho People around the 1800s

King Moshoeshoe I of the Basotho People around the 1800s

A Mosotho man wearing his hat(Modianyewo), and also wearing a goat or cow skin(most times they wear a blanket because Lesotho on the top of the mountains is a cold place

A Mosotho man wearing his hat(Modianyewo), and also wearing a goat or cow skin(most times they wear a blanket because Lesotho on the top of the mountains is a cold place

Basotho young girls in an Initiation school doing the traditional Dance

Basotho young girls in an Initiation school doing the traditional Dance

Basotho Men riding their horses in the Maluti's(Mountains)

Basotho Men riding their horses in the Maluti's(Mountains)

Basotho Women Showing off their Blankets

Basotho Women Showing off their Blankets

Basotho women dressed in their Sotho cultural dresses, along with embroidery on their dresses and beads in their hands and necks

Basotho women dressed in their Sotho cultural dresses, along with embroidery on their dresses and beads in their hands and necks

The Tsonga/Venda people who share an ancestry with the Nguni and Shangaan people, doing their dance in one of their cultural events

The Tsonga/Venda people who share an ancestry with the Nguni and Shangaan people, doing their dance in one of their cultural events

Traditional Tsonga/Venda Dolls

Traditional Tsonga/Venda Dolls

Ndebele Woman engaged in producing her art

Ndebele Woman engaged in producing her art

Ndebele Women in full traditional gear and jewelry sitting nex to their art

Ndebele Women in full traditional gear and jewelry sitting nex to their art

Ndebele Dolls

Ndebele Dolls

Ndebele Woman if full tradition wear

Ndebele Woman if full tradition wear

Mandela, in his younger days wearing the Xhosa traditional garb

Mandela, in his younger days wearing the Xhosa traditional garb

Xhosa Women in their traditional garb  and smoking their pipes. The elegant beadwork on their pipes keeps the pipestems cool enough to handle

Xhosa Women in their traditional garb and smoking their pipes. The elegant beadwork on their pipes keeps the pipestems cool enough to handle

Xhosa woman wearing traditional Xhosa cloth of long skirts, embroidered with horizontal stripes and placed at varying intervals

Xhosa woman wearing traditional Xhosa cloth of long skirts, embroidered with horizontal stripes and placed at varying intervals

Xhosa Woman enjoying her pipe at a cultural Village

Xhosa Woman enjoying her pipe at a cultural Village

Xhosa women wearing their headdresses, long skirts and their leather purses

Xhosa women wearing their headdresses, long skirts and their leather purses

Elderly Xhosa women in Xhosa traditional wear singing Xhosa customary songs

Elderly Xhosa women in Xhosa traditional wear singing Xhosa customary songs

Xhosa men being initiated into manhood clad in their cultural blankets

Xhosa men being initiated into manhood clad in their cultural blankets

Local Xhosa "Chiefs" in an "Imbizo"

Local Xhosa "Chiefs" in an "Imbizo"

Xhosa "Chiefs" about to enter 'Ubuntu' Educational Center

Xhosa "Chiefs" about to enter 'Ubuntu' Educational Center

Swazi Ladies adorning their traditional attire and in many colors and beads

Swazi Ladies adorning their traditional attire and in many colors and beads

Swazi people can be seen often clad in their traditional cloths "aMahiya", colorful beads and head decoration

Swazi people can be seen often clad in their traditional cloths "aMahiya", colorful beads and head decoration

Swazi children dancers clad in natural fauna of their villages(Leaves)

Swazi children dancers clad in natural fauna of their villages(Leaves)

Thembu men wearing collar beads and other decorative Beads and they belong to the Xhosa stock

Thembu men wearing collar beads and other decorative Beads and they belong to the Xhosa stock

Young Ndebele men have just finished their initiation stint wherein they were interned for two months and learning the responsibilities of a man

Young Ndebele men have just finished their initiation stint wherein they were interned for two months and learning the responsibilities of a man

A Young man from the Ndebele nation in South Africa on his initiation day

A Young man from the Ndebele nation in South Africa on his initiation day

the-blame-is-squarely-laid-on-the-feet-of-poor-africans-chains-on-the-minds-of-africans-dysfunctional-existence
Shangaan Musha: Mambuaulela Makhubela & his Shangaan Drums Dancers performing in Park Station, South Africa

Shangaan Musha: Mambuaulela Makhubela & his Shangaan Drums Dancers performing in Park Station, South Africa

Shangaan women's traditional dress and also used in dancing ceremonies and is know as "Motjeka"

Shangaan women's traditional dress and also used in dancing ceremonies and is know as "Motjeka"

Shangaan Children doing their traditional dance wearing their customary/traditional

Shangaan Children doing their traditional dance wearing their customary/traditional

A Shangaan man sitting next to her hud and wearing his hair the traditionally Shangaan way, and a cloth and beads

A Shangaan man sitting next to her hud and wearing his hair the traditionally Shangaan way, and a cloth and beads

Shangaan People in a village life setting wearing their traditional clothing

Shangaan People in a village life setting wearing their traditional clothing

Shangaan men in a dancing and festive mode

Shangaan men in a dancing and festive mode

Shangaan Male Dancers

Shangaan Male Dancers

Shangaan Traditional Healer

Shangaan Traditional Healer

A Tswana woman wearing her traditional scarf and head-wrap in Soweto, South Africa

A Tswana woman wearing her traditional scarf and head-wrap in Soweto, South Africa

The Tswana Male dancers showing off their traditional dance moves

The Tswana Male dancers showing off their traditional dance moves

The Tswana Children doing a traditional song and dance

The Tswana Children doing a traditional song and dance

The Tswana Girls Traditional Dance Troupe

The Tswana Girls Traditional Dance Troupe

Tswana Girls and Boys going through their traditional dance and song at a celebration

Tswana Girls and Boys going through their traditional dance and song at a celebration

Tswana man painted in traditional garb

Tswana man painted in traditional garb

Tswana Earthenware, red pigment

Tswana Earthenware, red pigment

The San man in a hunting mode

The San man in a hunting mode

San Woman carrying he child

San Woman carrying he child

The San people getting ready for a hunt

The San people getting ready for a hunt

The San people on their Trek in the Kalahari(Meaning the Great Thirst)

The San people on their Trek in the Kalahari(Meaning the Great Thirst)

A San youth dressed in simple cloth

A San youth dressed in simple cloth

Thembu men in their traditional beaded work apparel, and decor

Thembu men in their traditional beaded work apparel, and decor

Young bare breasted  Xhosa girls in traditional dress and in a procession

Young bare breasted Xhosa girls in traditional dress and in a procession

Xhosa . This is called "Ithumbu" Xhosa Bead Blanket Pin or Cloak Pin- This beaded pin is referred to as a "Love Letter", is large and is considered a bead panel

Xhosa . This is called "Ithumbu" Xhosa Bead Blanket Pin or Cloak Pin- This beaded pin is referred to as a "Love Letter", is large and is considered a bead panel

Shangaan- Tsonga or North Sotho(Bapedi)  mostly used for ceremonial and customary occasions by healers/Dingaka/Sangomas

Shangaan- Tsonga or North Sotho(Bapedi) mostly used for ceremonial and customary occasions by healers/Dingaka/Sangomas

Pedi Apron which is worn as front panels called "Gabi". These aprons are mede from leather, plant fiber and glass beads

Pedi Apron which is worn as front panels called "Gabi". These aprons are mede from leather, plant fiber and glass beads

Bottleslke this one are not curios, because they have specific usages. Its colors are popular with the Shangaan, the Pedis, and Tsongas and are popular to these clans

Bottleslke this one are not curios, because they have specific usages. Its colors are popular with the Shangaan, the Pedis, and Tsongas and are popular to these clans

Beaded Nebele blanket ccaleed "Irari" or "Nuga" or Ngurara. these blankets are worn by married Ndebele women only

Beaded Nebele blanket ccaleed "Irari" or "Nuga" or Ngurara. these blankets are worn by married Ndebele women only

Zulu beaded apron made with tiny glass beadsDazzling geometric designs were created by use of the brick stitch. Triangles in this apron are recorded to represent traditional Zulu Shields

Zulu beaded apron made with tiny glass beadsDazzling geometric designs were created by use of the brick stitch. Triangles in this apron are recorded to represent traditional Zulu Shields

Ndebele Apron called "Pepetu", which a small beaded apron worn by a young ndebele maiden after completing a period of seclusion. These ries represent female initiation

Ndebele Apron called "Pepetu", which a small beaded apron worn by a young ndebele maiden after completing a period of seclusion. These ries represent female initiation

The Ndebele Bride's train attached to her bridal costume

The Ndebele Bride's train attached to her bridal costume

Culturally, a girls "thetana" was made by a female relative, most often by her mother or grandmother. Due to the method of construction

Culturally, a girls "thetana" was made by a female relative, most often by her mother or grandmother. Due to the method of construction

The Nebele wore a long train with he bridal costume called "Nyoga", which meant snake. It was attached to her shoulders and trailed down the back to the ground, making a snake-like motion as she danced

The Nebele wore a long train with he bridal costume called "Nyoga", which meant snake. It was attached to her shoulders and trailed down the back to the ground, making a snake-like motion as she danced

Swazi People in their Traditional dresses

Swazi People in their Traditional dresses

Swazi people posing for a photo wearing their traditional gabardine

Swazi people posing for a photo wearing their traditional gabardine

King Mswati III of Swaziland

King Mswati III of Swaziland

Mantena cutural village know as"Ligugu Lemswati"(the pride of the Swati people" is where anyone wanting to learn about the Swazi culture can go.

Mantena cutural village know as"Ligugu Lemswati"(the pride of the Swati people" is where anyone wanting to learn about the Swazi culture can go.

King Mswati III and members of the  royal family watch a traditional Reed dance ceremony at the stadium at the Royal Palace

King Mswati III and members of the royal family watch a traditional Reed dance ceremony at the stadium at the Royal Palace

Women wearing the Shangaan 'Motjeka" traditional skirts

Women wearing the Shangaan 'Motjeka" traditional skirts

Shangaan women parading wearing their traditional clothing

Shangaan women parading wearing their traditional clothing

Shangaan children with their parents wearing their traditional clothing

Shangaan children with their parents wearing their traditional clothing

Wmen and children dancing int the streets singing traditional songs and dances

Wmen and children dancing int the streets singing traditional songs and dances

Shangaan girls wearing their "metjekas" clapping hands and singing their Shangaan traditional songs

Shangaan girls wearing their "metjekas" clapping hands and singing their Shangaan traditional songs

Traditional dancing in south Africa is part of the way of life of the indigenous

Traditional dancing in south Africa is part of the way of life of the indigenous

The name "Gondwana was suggested in 1872 by Medlicott from a sequence of nonmarine sedimentary rock, He took this name form the ancient kingdom of the Gonds, whom it was believed inhabited a large part of India

The name "Gondwana was suggested in 1872 by Medlicott from a sequence of nonmarine sedimentary rock, He took this name form the ancient kingdom of the Gonds, whom it was believed inhabited a large part of India

These are some of the Gold artifacts uncovered in the area of Limpopo know as Mapungubwe

These are some of the Gold artifacts uncovered in the area of Limpopo know as Mapungubwe

Necklace from Mapungubwe

Necklace from Mapungubwe

A portion of a gold animal with elongated head, rounded snout, bulging eyes, and ears drawn back is comprised of two gold foils. The animal figurine is three dimensional and may be anthropomorphic form Mapungubwe

A portion of a gold animal with elongated head, rounded snout, bulging eyes, and ears drawn back is comprised of two gold foils. The animal figurine is three dimensional and may be anthropomorphic form Mapungubwe

These ceramics shown here were found in Mapungubwe and some have been dated between AD 120 and AD 1030

These ceramics shown here were found in Mapungubwe and some have been dated between AD 120 and AD 1030

the-blame-is-squarely-laid-on-the-feet-of-poor-africans-chains-on-the-minds-of-africans-dysfunctional-existence
Found at Mapungubwe were terrestrial, freshwater, including complete cowries, ostrich eggshell and tortoiseshell fragments; ivory bangles, armbands

Found at Mapungubwe were terrestrial, freshwater, including complete cowries, ostrich eggshell and tortoiseshell fragments; ivory bangles, armbands

This is the iron works of mapungubwe; in the collectionfrom Mapungubwe you found bangles, anklets, beads, arrowheads, spears, rings, wire, plate, link, pins and pendants; alsom meturlurgical material resulting from smelting and smithing processes

This is the iron works of mapungubwe; in the collectionfrom Mapungubwe you found bangles, anklets, beads, arrowheads, spears, rings, wire, plate, link, pins and pendants; alsom meturlurgical material resulting from smelting and smithing processes

The Glass beads suggest a trade with the East and China and North Africa by the people of Mapungubwe; there was also trade around the 10th century with local Tswana, Pedi, Swazi and Sotho peoples of South Africa

The Glass beads suggest a trade with the East and China and North Africa by the people of Mapungubwe; there was also trade around the 10th century with local Tswana, Pedi, Swazi and Sotho peoples of South Africa

Some of the material culture from Mapungubwe

Some of the material culture from Mapungubwe

Golden Bangles from Mapungubwe

Golden Bangles from Mapungubwe

Porcelain jars from Mapungubwe on display in the Museum at Pretoria University

Porcelain jars from Mapungubwe on display in the Museum at Pretoria University

The oldest painting on a rock sheltr dated about 2400. Many sits in the Dranensburg and Mapungubwe contain scenes depicting hunting, dancing, fighting, food-gathering, ritual and trance scenes of hunting and rainmaking typiial of African culture, etc

The oldest painting on a rock sheltr dated about 2400. Many sits in the Dranensburg and Mapungubwe contain scenes depicting hunting, dancing, fighting, food-gathering, ritual and trance scenes of hunting and rainmaking typiial of African culture, etc

Bone points from various deposits at Early Modern Human sites in South Africa. From the blombos Cave (a) Peers Cave (b) Sibudu Cave (C) Klasies River (d) Later Stone Age Cottage Caves (e) Jubilee Shelter (f) Iron age at Mapumgubwe (g) Scale Bar

Bone points from various deposits at Early Modern Human sites in South Africa. From the blombos Cave (a) Peers Cave (b) Sibudu Cave (C) Klasies River (d) Later Stone Age Cottage Caves (e) Jubilee Shelter (f) Iron age at Mapumgubwe (g) Scale Bar

Gold canular  coiled anklets fashioned in the 12th or 13th century from flat strips which were wound around a bundle of organic fibers. Over 100 anklets were removed from fold grave  in Mapungubwe

Gold canular coiled anklets fashioned in the 12th or 13th century from flat strips which were wound around a bundle of organic fibers. Over 100 anklets were removed from fold grave in Mapungubwe

This gold tubular decorative ornament with shaped knob is folded from three sheets of gold foil, the sheets overlapping on the edges and held in place with rows of gold nails

This gold tubular decorative ornament with shaped knob is folded from three sheets of gold foil, the sheets overlapping on the edges and held in place with rows of gold nails

Golden Accessories and Artifacts found in Mapungubwe hill

Golden Accessories and Artifacts found in Mapungubwe hill

Golden perforated dish found in Mapungubwe

Golden perforated dish found in Mapungubwe

These two gold circular ornaments with double rows of incised chevron decoration resemble the top of the gold sceptre embossed with half-moon shaped decorations. the three dimensonal shaping was avhived by folding creasing and pleating the gold sheet

These two gold circular ornaments with double rows of incised chevron decoration resemble the top of the gold sceptre embossed with half-moon shaped decorations. the three dimensonal shaping was avhived by folding creasing and pleating the gold sheet

The diminutive sleek gold figurine with a long broadened tail and flattened eats probably depicts some leopard or some mammal

The diminutive sleek gold figurine with a long broadened tail and flattened eats probably depicts some leopard or some mammal

Minute gold nails or tacks were used to attache the sheets of gold foil to wooden carved froms. Number of gold nails recovered was 1428

Minute gold nails or tacks were used to attache the sheets of gold foil to wooden carved froms. Number of gold nails recovered was 1428

Gold Jewelry from Mapungubwe

Gold Jewelry from Mapungubwe

Large quantities of beads were excavated from three royal burial sites on Mapungubwe hill

Large quantities of beads were excavated from three royal burial sites on Mapungubwe hill

Prof. Phillip V. Tobias, Anthropologist siting in front of the skull and jawbone of the Taung Child, a famous specimen of Australopithecus Africanus

Prof. Phillip V. Tobias, Anthropologist siting in front of the skull and jawbone of the Taung Child, a famous specimen of Australopithecus Africanus

Credo Vusamazulu Mutwa and his charges

Credo Vusamazulu Mutwa and his charges

Venda Wall Structure

Venda Wall Structure

Venda Drum and housing art, architecture and statue

Venda Drum and housing art, architecture and statue

Venda home decoration and statue art

Venda home decoration and statue art

Venda Human figurines

Venda Human figurines

Venda Altar

Venda Altar

Venda Drummers o the 1940s

Venda Drummers o the 1940s

The disguise for the Venda initiates is made up of a series of grass mats wrapped around them; see picture below

The disguise for the Venda initiates is made up of a series of grass mats wrapped around them; see picture below

This is how the initiates for circumcision looks like. The dress abpove and the one wonr by the two men disguises them, and one here is crrying a typical old-fashined Venda battle axe

This is how the initiates for circumcision looks like. The dress abpove and the one wonr by the two men disguises them, and one here is crrying a typical old-fashined Venda battle axe

The Basotho women engaged in their "Mokgibo" dance, although this time singing standing

The Basotho women engaged in their "Mokgibo" dance, although this time singing standing

the-blame-is-squarely-laid-on-the-feet-of-poor-africans-chains-on-the-minds-of-africans-dysfunctional-existence
A Xhosa Mkwetha (Young man who has just been circumcised as part of their initiatiation to namnhood

A Xhosa Mkwetha (Young man who has just been circumcised as part of their initiatiation to namnhood

Boys from the circumcision "Mophato" ["lodge or compound"]. the Basotho believe that if a boy is not circumcised, he will not mature. There are many absurd stories about the boys' initiation. The hub has given, but a glimpse of it.

Boys from the circumcision "Mophato" ["lodge or compound"]. the Basotho believe that if a boy is not circumcised, he will not mature. There are many absurd stories about the boys' initiation. The hub has given, but a glimpse of it.

The Batswana circumcision initiates

The Batswana circumcision initiates

Xhosa Initiates

Xhosa Initiates

The Venda People in their traditional attire

The Venda People in their traditional attire

The Venda Doma Dance

The Venda Doma Dance

Venda Dancers

Venda Dancers

A Mopedi Woman with her customary stylized head-wrap

A Mopedi Woman with her customary stylized head-wrap

Two Ndebele Women with their toddlers

Two Ndebele Women with their toddlers

Basotho People next to their hut and adorned in their traditional garb(Their hats are called ("Modianyeho")

Basotho People next to their hut and adorned in their traditional garb(Their hats are called ("Modianyeho")

The Tsonga People of South Africa perform a traditional dance wearing their "Motjeka" skirts

The Tsonga People of South Africa perform a traditional dance wearing their "Motjeka" skirts

The Sotho Boys in "Lebollo"(Circumcition)

The Sotho Boys in "Lebollo"(Circumcition)

The Shangaan Women clad in their traditional wear, hair-do and colorful clothing

The Shangaan Women clad in their traditional wear, hair-do and colorful clothing

Shangaan Beadwork

Shangaan Beadwork

A Pie Chart of South African Languages plus percentages

A Pie Chart of South African Languages plus percentages

A population chart wherein one can see the minority had the most power under Apartheid

A population chart wherein one can see the minority had the most power under Apartheid

The Tsonga/Shangaan/ who live around the Limpopo along the Kruger National Park doing their traditional dance bumping from the ground in rhythm to the drums

The Tsonga/Shangaan/ who live around the Limpopo along the Kruger National Park doing their traditional dance bumping from the ground in rhythm to the drums

Xhosa initiates basking in the winter sun

Xhosa initiates basking in the winter sun

Sotho girls' initiation known as "bale" shown wearing masks and goatskin skits

Sotho girls' initiation known as "bale" shown wearing masks and goatskin skits

Basotho People's Craft

Basotho People's Craft

Basotho peoples  Dated from 1900sBeadwork

Basotho peoples Dated from 1900sBeadwork

Basotho Brewery Vessel("Eqho"). This particular example was copper pegged  at two points, then sealed with hornets wax. An iron band was cut and attached to its neck for added strength

Basotho Brewery Vessel("Eqho"). This particular example was copper pegged at two points, then sealed with hornets wax. An iron band was cut and attached to its neck for added strength

A Sesotho "Koto (Knob-Kerrie)

A Sesotho "Koto (Knob-Kerrie)

Basotho People with the Man wearing his 'grass'-made hat called Modianeo" and he and his wife waring a "Kobo"(Blanket.

Basotho People with the Man wearing his 'grass'-made hat called Modianeo" and he and his wife waring a "Kobo"(Blanket.

Basotho People's Beadwork

Basotho People's Beadwork

Another Basotho Vessel ("Eqho")

Another Basotho Vessel ("Eqho")

Sotho Steel -made called "Eqho"

Sotho Steel -made called "Eqho"

A Xhosa Beaded Pipe

A Xhosa Beaded Pipe

A Xhosa smoking pipe

A Xhosa smoking pipe

A woman lighting her pipe using a flint

A woman lighting her pipe using a flint

Basotho Cultural Village

Basotho Cultural Village

A Zulu people's hut

A Zulu people's hut

Ndebele Women and clad in their traditional Blanket and colors and standing next to their 'tall' doll

Ndebele Women and clad in their traditional Blanket and colors and standing next to their 'tall' doll

A Ndebele Necklace

A Ndebele Necklace

The Bapedi Women(Northern Sotho Nguni/Bakone) in their traditional dress

The Bapedi Women(Northern Sotho Nguni/Bakone) in their traditional dress

The Venda Women doing the traditional dance

The Venda Women doing the traditional dance

Swazi Men in traditional Garb same as the one worn by the Zulu Men

Swazi Men in traditional Garb same as the one worn by the Zulu Men

Swazi kids entertaining tourists clad in traditional garb and performing traditional and customary dances

Swazi kids entertaining tourists clad in traditional garb and performing traditional and customary dances

Swzi  male Dancers on Traditional Wear doing a Customary Dance

Swzi male Dancers on Traditional Wear doing a Customary Dance

The Sculpture of the Venda and Tsonga People of South Africa

The Sculpture of the Venda and Tsonga People of South Africa

Among the Nuni/Bakone people, the Ndebeles distinguish themselves from other by specializing in their attire and with sparkling colors used in their geometric art design on  the home walls

Among the Nuni/Bakone people, the Ndebeles distinguish themselves from other by specializing in their attire and with sparkling colors used in their geometric art design on the home walls

Ndebele Dolls

Ndebele Dolls

Ndebele Women Sanding Next to their painted houses and holding a traditional Ndebele Blanket

Ndebele Women Sanding Next to their painted houses and holding a traditional Ndebele Blanket

African Inspiration From the Ndebele People Of South Africa

African Inspiration From the Ndebele People Of South Africa

Ndebele Woman wearing the thick brass rings around her neck

Ndebele Woman wearing the thick brass rings around her neck

 A ndebele Woman in full cultural Regalia

A ndebele Woman in full cultural Regalia

the-blame-is-squarely-laid-on-the-feet-of-poor-africans-chains-on-the-minds-of-africans-dysfunctional-existence
the-blame-is-squarely-laid-on-the-feet-of-poor-africans-chains-on-the-minds-of-africans-dysfunctional-existence

The Genocidal and Tortured Legacy Lives of African Peoples Daily Lives - 365 Days Eternally

  • The Successful Revolutionary is a statesman; the unsuccessful one a criminal (Erich Fromm)

Gerrymandering of the Minds' Psyche

"What became of the Black People of Sumer?" the traveller asked the old man. "For ancient records show that the people of Sumer were Black. What happened to them?" "Ah, the old man sighed. They lost their history, so they died." - A Sumer Legend

"I am talking of millions of men who have been skillfully injected with fear, inferiority complexes, trepidation, servility, despair, abasement." - By Aime Cesaire

I have been meaning to write on this subject on the History, Customs, Traditions, Culture, Languages, Rites and Practices of the African South Africans, for a long time. In my past Hubs, I have tried to cover ground on the lives of Africans in Africa and South Africa and what they have been going through for the past 300-plus years of oppression, subjugation, depression, repression and the intensely and extreme violation of their humanity, culture, customs, land and existence.

This is a very serious point I am about to discuss: i.e., how, when and why this was done and is still being done; also, what was life, culture and customs of Africans in the South of Sahara and southern Africa like before and after the coming of the Europeans later-on deep and further into this Hub; and what this life is like today. In the process I will give a serious version of Modern African culture, and an even more deeper historical delineation and concrete historical cultural breakdown, i.e., the customs, culture and practices of the Nguni as narrated by themselves-and also using African-centered references to solidify and anchor the discussion I am about to lay out below.

The topic I am embarking on may not be popular or much known subject, [Maybe too long for the Internet], but I am going to try and unpack this historical phenomenon of a distorted and dysfunctional African society and picture[image] of African Culture and Customs that we read about today, and how the remnants of this African culture we see today affects Africans in their lives and existence in the past and at presently: that of being Oppressed, suppressed, depressed, repressed, enslaved, colonized and stripped off all their cultures, customs, tradition, languages, and have poverty and all types of diseases imposed on them; and, how their cultural practices and traditional rites have been relegated to the inferior status of being regarded as irrelevant, closer to child babble/barbaric and need not be paid any attention to, whatsoever: i.e., a culture best forgotten for it has never been of any use to the Africans themselves.

As of the writing of this Hub, the level of subjugation, neglect, being ignored, having imposed ignorance hunger a constant, and a bleak future and dreadful intolerable existence, has gone into over-drive! Also, later in the Hub, we look as to how the remnants of the present African culture can be looked at anew and thus Africans be able draw inspiration from its present presence and manifestation; also, the past history[as taught by Apartheid] and cultural and customary and traditional historiography issues will be addressed in order to give a complete picture of the past and present-and scholars from the African centered perspectives will be used in order to add muscle to the skeleton of the history of Africans South Africans.

The History of South Africa will be linked to the Civilization of Mapungubwe to begin turning the tide against the lies that impregnate Historical books and journals written by those who are not Africans, or with African 'collaborators'-that Africans of South Africa did not inhabit nor own the land known as South Africa today. There is this lie and myth that has been perpetuated that Africans migrated to South Africa from the North of Africa, and came at more or less the same time as the Dutch landed in the Cape: nothing could be further from the truth than this blatant ahistorical misinformation and lie which I plan to deconstruct in this Hub.

The voices of those Oppressed multitudes in South Africa has been silenced, treaded-upon, scorned, dismissed, ridiculed, mocked, derided attacked, labelled as inhospitable and backward hosts, foreigners, and called Dogs(Read the history of Van Riebeeck on this issue), called "Bantu", "Natives, "Kaffirs", "Plurals"; the locals were labelled as being lazy, inferior, stupid, slow, not-worthy-of-their-land-and-its-riches-as has been touted by the Apartheid rulers, and today can be observed and said by the new foreigners now living in South Africa and disrespecting the local Africans and hurling this type of abuse at them from every quarter.

That in the end we find the local Africans living in squalor, poverty, sicknesses and diseases of all kinds, ignorance, confusion and tension, uncertainty; and, in recent times, within an empty and hollow democracy- and being denied their humanity, democracy, culture customs, traditions, practices and ceremonies and basic human services and comfort; this has led to today's Colonial Mental disorders that are now commonplace amongst the Africans of South Africa.

Meanwhile, their detractors have no full understanding and nor sufficient knowledge of all the issues at play in the lives of Africans in South Africa and in the southern regions of Africa below the Sahara. Africans have been as a people under Siege - Literally and Practically; daily and to date! Suffering all these social malaise and dysfunctional social realities, and adding insult to injury, the Local African people of South Africa are the least respected communities in South Africa(as noted above) in their land of birth, and this is also visited on them by their own elected ANC-led government.

Everyone[most foreigners and European and some Africans[from the countries north of South Africa, and Africans South Africans, in South Africa, DISRESPECT the indigenous native Africans of South Africa, and this has become the way of life under the so-called rainbow government, too.

The Africans of South Africa who have moved up the social ladder, have some contempt for their poor brethren who are running confused and have no one to lead them or help them. If most of the tourists would begin to go into the townships, live with the people, and not see them through the lens of the past structures and strictures that were created for white dominance and pleasure, that is, meet these Africans in western-style cities, hotels and bars and shopping centers, does not make these people know who the Africans of South Africa are.

One can read the internet as much as possible, or visit South Africa for a month or year, but so long as that is the case, tourists living in five star hotels , and head to the townships through guided tours and take some pictures, this does not necessarily make them authorities on the Africans of South Africa-especially the posts they make on the Net(Facebook for one and other Social Networking sites, blogs and so forth.

This onslaught is gathering momentum and the African people have already noted that this is one issue which the world will see heads rolling! I mean, at present there is this struggle for Africans of South Africa trying to make sense of all what is going, and the there'll be action once they figure out what is happening to them.

There comes a time, when African people believe in the affairs of men and nations, and it becomes necessary for them to engage in 'bolekaja' ("Come down let's fight!") — a term applied in Western Nigeria to passenger lorries ("mammy wagon") from the outrageous behavior of their touts… I would like to make it clear, (without apologies to anyone)!

I am a 'bolekaja' pundit, like those outraged 'touts for the passenger lorries, (South African Taxis!), of African History, Culture and Customs, and that am administering a timely and healthy dose of much needed public ridicule to the reams of pompous nonsense which has been floating out of the stale, sterile, stifling caverns of academia and unequal and oppressive society such as the one in South Africa, which is smothering the sprouting vitality of democracy and freedom on Africa's Historical, political, economical and cultural landscape.

This the African people will have to do as a united people, i.e., to drag the stiflers of their lives down to earth for a corrective tussle. A little wrestle on the sands never killed a sturdy youth. I expect that this will help the sprouting democracy redirect and control their sprouting democracy and freedom into a modern and thriving society, culture and all its naturally acquired wares to their own benefit enhancement and upliftment. African people in this article will be drawn to the act that they need to cure themselves from 'colonial hangover' (Colonial setlamatlama).

The showing and writing about African culture, customs, traditions, languages and crafts will help and enable Africans to begin to see their selves not as "tribes", but as nations which are one and the same, and are made up of various and diverse, but the same culture, customs, traditions and practices and languages,which are not different customary and cultural practices as has been heretofore trumpeted by their detractors: This has been in such a way as to try to dismantle and debase the Nguni People's cultural mosaic. Let controversy rage; may it stimulate creative discussion...! "Ha eye Tau!(Let the Lion loose)

Mind Bending And Soul Wrenching Accessories

Education As Key

For the [past 500 plus-years], therefore, the world has been ruled/molded in the image and likeness of Europe. European history now becomes world history and the European experience now becomes the universal experience. One of the primary weapons Europeans have used to ossify, perpetuate, and maintain the myth and Big Lie of European supremacy, invincibility, and originality coterminous with the myth/Big Lie of African's inferiority and nothingness is education, albeit, miseducation. (Clarke)

I intend to use this Hub as an educational reference for those who would like to investigate some of the issues that will be raised herein. This will done so that a counter could furnished against those academic and writers of all stripes trying to tell the world about Africans in South Africa, without really contacting them, living in their places of domicile, nor knowing very much about the African communities and the Nation of Africans in South Africa as a whole.

Paulo Freire reminds us, "What these educators are calling dialogical is a process that hides the true nature of dialogue as a process of learning and knowing. ...Understanding dialogue as a process of learning and knowing establishes a previous requirement that always involves an epistemological curiosity about the very elements of the dialogue."

Freire reminds us that, "The awakening of critical consciousness leads the way to the expression of social discontents precisely because these discontents are real components of an oppressive situation." But as noted in the paragraph above, these knowledgeable persons who talk about Africans, cull their information form Apartheid's ideological projection of Africans, and from their own assessments which do not jive with the reality of Africans in South Africa.

We need to remember that beginning from the times of bombs, guns, bulldozers and brutal tortures, that the Europeans brought along with them when first colonizing Africans, Africans faced daily displays of state violence, beat downs on their bodies, with Apartheid operating with impunity through overt and covert political, economical, social and religious violence — conventional and counter insurgency warfare, forced removals, assassinations, "disappearances", detention and torture -as well as through myriad forms of "structural violence."

Under the weight of this oppression, and the gaze of psychological surveillance that had previously pathologized the African mind as an object of White consciousness was reversed, African people had to 'cope' and still hoping and surviving the constant and age-old onslaught on their humanity and human rights and freedom of expression and to live as a sovereign nation. In the 1970s a counterpoint to the destructive power of sovereign violence was secured into place.

Euro-colonial education was designed to produce people who would participate in the process of colonial rule; people who would participate in the process of their own oppression and in the oppression of their own fellow colonized people (neocolonialism); moreover "colonized schooling was education for subordination, exploitation, the creation of mental confusion, and the development of underdevelopment," powerlessness and dependency. Africans are re-living this horror in manifold ways today under the ANC-elected government. It also reinforced the "notion of privilege" and the "notion of alienation" (divide and conquer).

In other words, colonial and neocolonial education ossified the psychological dependency complex of the African colonized/oppressed to the extent that in the era of "flag independence," the African "wasn't preparing to be a sovereign nation" but instead was only "preparing" to imitate his slave master's ruling of a nation(Clarke). The condition of the people of African descent is testament to the statements made above.

Ipso facto, Africans not only: ...take for granted the validity, truth, and superiority of the culture of the (European) colonizer but )also) assume that the behaviors, culture, values, life-styles, moral preferences and definitions of morality of the colonized as invalid, wrong, false, or inferior... (Moreover, they) have been infected and conditioned to invalidate and reject their own culture, value and philosophical individuality ...

[They] tend to evaluate their behaviors in terms of whether or not they are acceptable to (European) colonizer. (They accept) the colonizer as the standard …[and] crave to be like their colonizers ... Clarke wryly adds: "European scholarship has darkened "The True Light of African History" and as a result we are brain-dead, brain damaged, and culturally comatose. What African people need to do as we are now in the 21 century is to de-Europeanize, de-mystify, detoxify, and de-brainwash their subconscious mind of this invisible drug called Eurocentric miseducation. In this way we can relocate our subconscious mind-set to its original locus/reference point - Mother Africa."

Prof. Clarke warns that: " ...We have to realize that education has but one honorable purpose ... one alone ... everything else is a waste of time: that is to train the student to be a proper handler of power. Being Black and beautiful means nothing until ultimately your Black and powerful. The world is ruled by power, not Blackness and beauty ..." I also add that power on behalf of an Imperial or deep pocketed Capitalist of Corporate potentates, is not power at all. So long as the education of African children and African society is not in their control, and is controlled by others, they will remain not only slaves and chained people, but also second hand poor copies of their masters. It would advisable to learn some thoughts and ideas about education from Jose Marti who writes:

1. Instruction is not the same as education: the former refers to thought, the latter principally to feelings. Nevertheless, there is no good education without instruction. Moral qualities rise in price when they are enhanced by qualities of intellect.

2. Popular education does not mean education of the poorer classes exclusively, but rather that all classes in the nation-tantamount to saying the people-be well educated. Just as there is no reason why the rich are educated and not the poor, what reason is there for the poor to be educated and not the rich? They are all the same.

3. He who knows more is worth more. To know is to possess. Coins are minted, knowledge is not. Bonds or paper money are worth more, or less, or nothing; knowledge always has the same value, and it is always high. a rich man needs money with which to live, but he can lose it and then he no longer has the means of living. An instructed man lives from his knowledge, and since he carries it with him, he never loses it and his existence is easy and secure.

4. The Happiest nation is the one whose sons have the best education, both in instruction of thought and the direction of feelings. An instructed people loves work and knows who to derive profit from it. A virtuous people will live a happier and richer life than another that is filled with vices, and will better defend itself from all attacks.

5. Every man when he arrives upon tis earth, has a right to be educated, and then in, in payment, the duty to contribute to the education of others.

6. An ignorant people can be deceived by superstition and become servile. An instructed people will always be strong and free. An ignorant man is on his way to becoming a beast, and a man instructed in knowledge and conscience is on his way to being a god. one must not hesitate to choose between a nation of gods and a nation of beasts. the best way to defend our rights is to know them well; in so doing one has faith and strength; every nation will be unhappy in proportion to how poorly educated ate its inhabitants. A nation of educated men will always be a nation of free men. Education is the only means of being saved from slavery. A nation enslaved to men of another nation is as repugnant as being enslaved to the men of one's own.

That is why the writing of this Hub is important in that it attempts to bring to the fore-front of Human World history, respect for and knowledge about African South Africans and their history, customs, tradition, languages, practices and rites more serious and respect that it deserves. The intention of this Hub is to earn that knowledge and respect of Africans and their being recognized as a Nation. Education, which is now in decrepit state, needs to be addressed promptly and thoroughly otherwise Africans will remain enslaved, as Jose Marti so expertly observed: "A nation enslaved to men of another nation is as repugnant as being enslaved to the men of one's own." It is also important to note how "Ubuntu" is displaced by "Alienation" which we will explore below

Ubuntu! Botho! The Act of Being a Human Being

"Paulo Freire connects the thoughts of Professor Clarke above by writing: 'While the problem of humanization("Ubuntu'?), has always, from an axiological point of view, been human kind's central problem, it now takes on the character of an inescapable concern. ...Within history, in concrete, objective contexts, both humanization and dehumanization are possibilities for a person as an uncompleted being conscious of their incompletion. Dehumanization, which marks not only those whose humanity has been stolen, but also (though in a different way) those who have stolen it, is a distortion of the vocation of becoming more fully human.

This distortion occurs within history; but it is not a historical vocation. Indeed, to admit of dehumanization as a historical vocation would lead either to cynicism or total despair. The struggle for humanization, for emancipation of labor, for the overcoming of alienation, for the affirmation of men and women as persons would be meaningless.

This struggle is possible only because dehumanization, although a concrete historical fact, is not a given destiny but the result of an unjust order that engenders violence in the oppressors,which in turn dehumanizes the oppressed. It is very important that Education should be revamped and looked anew-education of a nation should be controlled and be in the hands of those whose interests it serves, and in this case, it should be controlled by and serve the interests of African South Africans.

One of the thrusts of this Hub is to essentially talk about the dehumanization that Fromm is talking about above. As has been noted in the other Hubs written about the lives of Africans under Apartheid. In this instance, one constant feature is the denigration and dehumanization of Africans in South Africa for the past centuries, and the modus operandi towards nation building is for them to decolonize, deprogram, de-colonize themselves, as Clarke has pointed out above.

It is absolutely clear that the majority have been denied decent education and respectable humanity, and with the advent of an incompetent ANC-led government, we have and are witnessing the disappearance of several generations engulfed by ignorance, poverty, mental diseases[of which these are on the rise as we speak] — carried from the past[as dictated by Apartheid], and present, of course the future, as it is now being set up by the ANC.

The ANC-led government is failing in its tasks to help educate the Africans masses because of the encroaching state and centralized control which is aggressively being pushed by foreign monied interests and governments (You can read the book "Confessions of the Economic Hitman" on this subject of operatives, governments and corporations in other countries).

The root of the problems now facing African South Africans in education was the appointment of the intellectually weak Sibusiso Bengu and the blustering Ideologue, Kader Asmal, They introduced "Outcome-based" education, and as they did so, both had no clue how to begin to overcome the effects of Apartheid's eduactional legacy and its effects on Africans, and they have no idea what needs to be done for the present state of education amongst Africans today.

Jose Marti writes: "The general happiness of a nation rests upon the individual independence of its inhabitants. A free nation is the result of free settlers. Honorable and durable nations are not made out for men who cannot live for themselves but are attached to a leader who favors, uses, or abuses them. Whoever desires an enduring nation aids in establishing his country's affairs so that each man may work in active labor applicable to a personal and independent situation. Let every man learn to make something which other need…" What, then, we have here is a situation turned on its head.

The present leaders in South Africa do not adhere to the maxims above, instead they have seriously embarked on to the road of corruption, greed, nepotism, cronyism, cabals, demagoguery, being imperial lackeys, fostering of community and social underdevelopment and impoverishment of their fellow being who form the bulk of the nation of South Africa: Africans! Erich Fromm describes this condition as follows:

"Reason is man's faculty for grasping the world by thought, in contradiction to intelligence, which is man's ability to manipulate the world with the help of thought.

"Reason is man's instrument for arriving at the truth, intelligence is man's instrument for manipulating the world more successfully; the former is essentially human, the latter belongs to the animal part of man."

This has been denied to Africans in South Africa since the coming of the Dutch seafarers/colonialists, and in the present day Democracy they have yet to be achieved and realized. That is why the Africans in South Africa today are saying that, "We wanted Freedom and they gave us Democracy."

The masses in South Africa are attached to leaders who 'favors, uses,or abuses them.' Although we know for a fact that, 'man will arrive at the truth, intelligence as their instrument for manipulating the world more successfully,' as in the case of the poor African majority eventually will, the very negative actions of their own elected government is constantly making them feel alienated, and social security a remote possibility, they will always feel oppressed and suppressed.

Erich Fromm informs us that:

"By alienation it is meant mode of experience in which the person experiences himself as an alien. He has become, one might say, estranged from himself. He does not experience himself as the center of his world, as the creator of his own acts — but his acts and their consequences have become his masters, whom he obeys, or whom he may even worship.

"The alienated person is out of touch with himself as he is out of touch with any other person. He, like the others, are experienced as things are experienced; with the senses and with common sense, but at the same time without being related to oneself and to the world outside positively.

"Africans are experiencing alienated life in contemporary South Africa as something that is not connected to them The 'elite' who rule over the dominated African majority, makes one wonder if these educated persons are actually equipped to face the real ordeal before them or unconsciously contribute to their own undoing by perpetuating the regime of the oppressor. "(Woodson)

This attitude of being blocked at every turn can be traced by taking a critical and seriously in-depth look at African South African history and culture and its meaning in the African society. This means that Africans need to learn and teach, control and design for themselves their education and culture, as they understand and know it and disseminate it throughout their people and a nation-as they see fit.

Cultural Miasma

Erich Fromm informs us as follows:

"The basic entity of the social process is the individual, just as to understand the individual we must see him in the context of the culture that molds him [this we will look at in-depth below]. To understand the dynamics of the social process we must understand the dynamics of the psychological processes operating within the individual, just as to understand the individual, we must see him in the context of the culture which molds him.

"Modern man, freed from the bonds of pre-individualistic society, which simultaneously gave him security and limited him, has not gained freedom in the positive sense of the realization of his individual self; that is, the expression of his intellectual, emotional and sensuous potentialities.

"Freedom, though it has brought him independence and rationality, has made him isolated and, thereby, anxious and powerless. This isolation is unbearable and the alternatives he is confronted with are either to escape from the burden of his freedom into new dependencies and submission, or to advance to the full realization of positive freedom which based upon the uniqueness and individuality of man.

."…After centuries of struggles, man succeeded in building an undreamed-of wealth of material goods; he built democratic societies in parts of the world, and recently was victorious in defending himself against new totalitarian schemes(Hitlers debacles); yet, modern man still is anxious and tempted to surrender his freedom to dictators of all kinds, or to lose it by transforming himself into a small cog in the machine, well fed, and well clothed, yet not free man but an automaton."

This can be seen amongst the newly enriched Africans, albeit they be few in number compared to the whole African population.

Under the weight of this oppression, the gaze of psychosocial surveillance that previously had pathologized the African mind as an object of White consciousness was reversed. I have touched a bit on this mindset and set of social relations that were part of the reality of South Africa from 1652 up to De Klerk's rule, above. In the 1970s, and as the single most prominent disciplinary counterpoint to the destructive power of sovereign violence, Biko's Black Consciousness(BC) emerged to motivate an African Personality. Bantu instructs thus: "In my opinion, it is not necessa