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Homeless in America: Why?

James A. Watkins is an entrepreneur, musician, and a writer with four non-fiction books and hundreds of magazine articles read by millions.

Homeless in America

Homeless in America

Homelessness in America

Homelessness is a problem that vexes and perplexes Americans. Perhaps 600,000 souls are homeless. Thirty-three federal agencies exist to end the homeless plight.

Despite massive amounts spent by local, state, and federal governments and private charities, the dilemma deepens.

In New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and even Vancouver, Canada, city streets are strewn with homeless encampments, filled with feces, urine, rats, trash, and millions of used hypodermic needles. Residents complain about the homeless because of their open drug use, psychotic episodes, and criminal behavior. Meanwhile, medieval diseases have made a comeback in these cities. The homeless are ravaged by Typhus, shigellosis, trench fever, and Hepatitis A.

Homeless in New York

Homeless in New York

Homeless in New York

New York has the fastest-growing homeless burden in America. The Department of Homeless Services for New York City lavished two billion dollars on its clients in 2018: $33,539 per homeless person. There were 61,421 of them then; now, there might be 100,000—more than any other metropolis in the country. The city bureaucracy has thousands of employees, one for every 23 homeless individuals. That is a far better ratio than the one police officer who serves and protects 234 New Yorkers.

Homeless in Los Angeles

Homeless in Los Angeles

Homeless in Los Angeles

In the video below, we see a giant shantytown in once-pristine Orange County, California. There was another one near Oakland that covered 68 acres. And two others that are enormous, hundreds of miles apart. The only unifying factor is that they all share the same state government — a state that’s more than $400 billion in debt.

California may be a Leftist Haven and Democrat Utopia. Still, it leads the nation in homelessness, with almost one in four of every homeless person in our country living there — 130,000 in total—a massive statewide problem. Los Angeles County alone has 66,000 homeless. Consider also the wildfire that destroyed six homes in Bel-Air was started by cooking from a nearby homeless encampment. And consider that crime has nearly doubled in the last decade in central LA.

In 2016, Los Angeles voters approved Proposition HHH, authorizing $1.2 billion to build 10,000 units of “affordable housing.” Three years later, only 72 were finished, at the cost of $690,692 each. The number of people on the streets increased by 16%.

In 2018, the City of Los Angeles doubled its budget to combat homelessness to $450 million. Los Angeles County threw in an additional $374 million. A nonprofit announced it would shell out $65 million to build 153 studio apartments in Skid Row. Homelessness increased by 26%.

Almost 9 Minutes of Biking with Unfortunate View at Santa Ana River Trail

Homeless in San Francisco

The 'progressives' that have ruled San Francisco for fifty years have transformed the once "most beautiful city in America" into a literal toilet. To safely ambulate around the town, one must first consult a 'poop map.'

In 2018, San Francisco disbursed $280 million to take care of its 7,500 homeless people, nearly double what it had been allocating. It made no observable difference. So voters approved a new $250 million tax on companies based in the city to solve the problem. It got worse.

San Francisco features the most property crime of any city in America. Residents filed 60,000 complaints in one year about crimes committed by the homeless. Law enforcement ignored most in the name of 'tolerance.' Only 125 arrests were made. An additional 28,000 citizens complained about poop on the streets and sidewalks, which are befouled worse than in the poorest parts of Kenya, Brazil, or India.

Homeless in San Francisco

Homeless in San Francisco

Homeless in Seattle

According to the Puget Sound Business Journal, the Seattle Metropolitan Area spends more than $1 billion per year on homeless people. The Democrat Socialists in charge promised they could handle the crisis if they only spent more money. News anchor Eric Johnson of KOMO-TV exclaims, "The more money we throw at the problem, the worse it gets."

Expenditures on the homeless doubled in four years in Seattle. The homeless population nearly doubled as well during that same time, to 12,000, more per capita than in any other city in the country. The city bestows $100,000 on each homeless individual while crews clean up tens of thousands of dirty syringes from parks, streets, children’s playgrounds, and private gardens. Astoundingly, the more they spend, they buy more derelicts, addiction, and crime. There is no metric by which one can claim what they do is working.

According to the Seattle police, virtue signaling by politicians to order law enforcement not to enforce quality-of-life laws is the cause of the calamity. One police officer stated, "People come here because it’s Free-attle. They believe if they come here, they will get free food, free medical treatment, free mental health treatment, a free tent, free clothes, and will be free of prosecution for just about anything, and they are right." Even if the police arrest a homeless person, prosecutors dismiss the charges in 82% of the cases.

Christopher Rufo, perhaps the leading expert on homelessness in America, and whose research I used in building this article, reports in City Journal: “Public complaints about homeless encampments from the first three months of this year are an array of horrors: theft, drugs, fighting, rape, murder, explosions, prostitution, assaults, needles, and feces. Yet prosecutors have dropped thousands of misdemeanor cases, and police officers are directed not to arrest people for ‘homelessness-related’ offenses, including theft, destruction of property, and drug crimes.”

Gil Costello, formerly homeless in Seattle himself, explains in First Things magazine: “The city of Seattle is overrun with homeless people, including runaways and drug addicts. The jails are full. Any theft involving less than $2,000—they let you go. Police ignore these smaller crimes because the city has to save money. Seattle needs jail cells for more advanced criminals. Everyone on the streets knows how the system works. Most of the people in the homeless population have come from other major American cities with government help. The miscreants are provided with one-way air or bus tickets to Seattle. Don’t assume these recipients are victims. They are masters at working the system, always first in line for benefits. The bureaucrats build careers off homelessness, and they have devised techniques to hide ugly and frightening realities. People arriving from other cities are processed to become ‘locals.’ Soon after landing, they are assigned a local zip code with an address (of a post office, church, or intake center). City officials actually pay people to wait at the Greyhound bus terminal to process fresh arrivals.“

Seattle is Dying

Homeless in Vancouver

Lest we forget our neighbors to the north, Vancouver, Canada, is no stranger to homelessness. Yes, Vancouver is a world-class city; prosperous, booming, and progressive with universal health care. It is also full of homeless drug addicts that are breaking records for death by overdose.

Vancouver's Skid Row is a crowded ten-block area called Downside East. It is probably the most studied neighborhood on Earth. It is estimated that 6,500 scientific reports, magazine articles, and essays have been published about it. Besides the homeless, the community is home to brothels, bars, fleabag hotels, and an astounding 170 nonprofit social services outfits.

Always forward-thinking, Vancouver established public needle exchanges in 1988, followed by the first “supervised injection site” in North America in 2003. Taxpayers dole out a million dollars per day for the homeless of Downside East. But nothing has gotten better. On the contrary, homelessness, addiction, and crime have doubled or tripled in just the past few years. Eight thousand souls were treated for drug overdose in one year out of a population of only 3,000 in Downside East.

Homeless in Vancouver

Homeless in Vancouver

The Homelessness Industry

Eleanor Owen founded the Seattle Downtown Emergency Service Center for the homeless. As an insider, she offers a particularly poignant perspective: "The mission of homeless advocates has shifted over the years from helping the homeless to securing government contracts, with one maintaining a $112 million real-estate portfolio and paying a staff of nearly 900. It’s disgraceful. When we started, we kept our costs low and helped people get back on their feet. Now the question is: How can I collect another city contract? How can I collect more Medicaid dollars? How can I collect more federal matching funds? It's more important to keep the staff paid than actually to help the poor become self-sufficient."

Helping the homeless has become a lucrative industry, with leaders of organizations earning $200,000 per year. These organizations have iniquitous inducements. If they solve the homeless problem, they eliminate their own jobs. If they cut it in half, their budgets get cut, perhaps along with their salaries. If the situation gets worse, their resources expand along with their pay.

There has to be a crisis to justify billions of dollars in spending by taxpayers. If they fail to solve the predicament, they blame it on "greedy landlords," “lack of adequate housing,” “wage inequity,” “economic injustice,” “capitalism,” “climate change,” “racism,” or “white supremacy.” That is why the problem is so prevalent in progressive places where politicians commonly mouth these buzzwords. California has six times the homelessness of Texas, Colorado four times more than Utah, Oregon and Washington more than the average ten states combined.

Perhaps 100,000 people work in the homeless industry. They have a vested interest in seeing it continue. As the former director of homeless services for New York City, Nancy Wackstein, once admitted, “If you focused on drug problems or family breakdown, you play into that blaming-the-victim mentality. You don’t want to say that people’s problems were a result of their own actions because then you would get no public support for helping them.”

Homeless in Seattle

Homeless in Seattle

Why Are People Homeless?

I have always helped any downtrodden person I could. I certainly believe in Christian charity to help someone get on their feet. I have been involved in and financially supported dozens of splendid charities. But to truly help the homeless, we must first be honest about the truth of their condition, no matter how awkward or uncomfortable that might be. We must accept the world as it is, not how we wish it were.

The fact is, there are people who, if we offered them an apartment and a job, would choose to stay on the streets. Throughout human history, there have always been hobos, bums, tramps, vagabonds, and beggars. There are more today because the Mental Health Act of 1963 dumped lunatics on the streets. The idea was that it was 'cruel' to institutionalize people with mental health problems in insane asylums. Almost all of those poor souls proved incapable of taking care of themselves, of providing for themselves. They are dysfunctional, unable to plan ahead, be responsible, make sound decisions, control their impulses, and delay gratification.

Despite progressive mayors and governors soaking the taxpayers for billions of dollars to build public housing for the homeless, lack of housing is not the real issue. For instance, in Los Angeles, less than half the homeless shelters are full. Twenty-two percent of the beds are empty on average.

According to research by UCLA, 75% of the homeless are mentally ill, and 78% are drug addicts. A study in Seattle found that 63% refuse shelter when it is offered. When asked, the homeless people say that almost all the people on the streets regularly use drugs. “Out here, everyone’s taking something,” a man named Karl explains. A woman elaborated, “You find me someone sleeping rough out here who claims they don’t take drugs, and I’ll show you a leprechaun.”

Of course, with free needles doled out by the government, along with safe places to shoot up, open-air intravenous drug injection seems downright encouraged. The homeless usually beg for drug money; some make $100 a day. Others harass, intimidate, and threaten passersby.

A reporter interviewed another man, who said he has standing offers for free housing and spots in a drug treatment facility but always refuses. "Out here, I feel like a king. I have everything I need; why would I give that up? There is a lot of help here, showers and free clothes. Nobody tells me what to do, and I get high whenever I have money.”

I will add that some believe the percentage of the homeless with mental illness is greatly exaggerated. They say that drug addicts have been trained to claim that they have mental health issues because nobody feels sorry for someone who says, "I am a junkie by choice. I am an adult with free will, and I love to get high, and I will do anything to keep my buzz going. That is what I care about the most."

Homeless Shelter in San Francisco

Homeless Shelter in San Francisco

How to Solve the Problem

There is no denying that some ordinary people who, through no fault of their own, end up temporarily homeless. The media, working for their fellow leftists in government, hunt these people down and broadcast their stories as propaganda to convince the public that enormous expenses from the public treasury are the solution.

Homelessness is primarily a mental health and drug abuse issue. Homelessness benefits governments. Therefore, no government is ever going to do anything to solve it. If a charity wants to take their cases on privately, I have no problem with that. But the idea that the taxpayer should be on the hook? No.

As Christopher Rufo writes: “The reality is that homelessness is a product of disaffiliation. For the past 70 years, sociologists, political scientists, and theologians have documented the slow atomization of society. As family and community bonds weaken, our most vulnerable citizens fall victim to the addiction, mental illness, isolation, poverty, and despair that almost always precipitate the final slide into homelessness.”

Alice Baum and Donald Burnes wrote the definitive book on homelessness. They put it this way: “Homelessness is a condition of disengagement from ordinary society—from family, friends, neighborhood, church, and community. Poor people who have family ties, teenaged mothers who have support systems, mentally ill individuals who are able to maintain social and family relationships, alcoholics who are still connected to their friends and jobs, even drug addicts who manage to remain part of their community do not become homeless. Homelessness occurs when people no longer have relationships; they have drifted into isolation, often running away from the support networks they could count on in the past.”

Rufo again: “Homelessness is not driven primarily by high housing costs, but rather by three interrelated phenomena: addiction, mental illness, and permissive public policies. The truth is that homelessness is not primarily a housing problem but a human one. Mayors, developers, and service providers want to cut ribbons in front of new residential towers, but the real challenge is not just to build new apartment units but to rebuild the human beings who live inside them. The Reverend seems to understand what the policymakers won’t: that the people on Skid Row are the casualties, not of capitalism or an unfair social system, but of a profound spiritual crisis. The best way to prevent homelessness isn’t to build new apartment complexes or pass new tax levies but to rebuild the family, community, and social bonds that once held communities together.”

San Francisco Poop Map

San Francisco Poop Map

Comments

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on March 02, 2021:

Mark Richardson ~ Thank you for taking the time to read my article. I had not heard of the famous gentleman you quote. I appreciate you bringing him to my attention. The quote you posted is extraordinary. I fully approve of that message.

Mark Richardson from Utah on February 28, 2021:

Also, Ezra Taft Benson was strongly against Communism

Mark Richardson from Utah on February 28, 2021:

“The Lord works from the inside out. The world works from the outside in. The world would take people out of the slums. Christ would take the slums out of people, and then they would take themselves out of the slums.

The world would mold men by changing their environment. Christ changes men, who then change their environment. The world would shape human behavior, but Christ can change human nature.”

― Ezra Taft Benson

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 18, 2021:

Denise McGill ~ Thank you for reading my article. I appreciate your thoughtful correspondence. I am sorry to hear that you have experienced homelessness twice. That must have been terrifying. I too "have a heart for the homeless who are there through no fault of their own." I am grateful to receive your blessings.

God Bless You!

James

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 16, 2021:

L.M. Hosler ~ Exactly! It has gone from wanting to help people to a big business. Thank you for your comments. I appreciate you reading my piece.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 16, 2021:

MG Singh emge ~ I appreciate your comments. Thank you for reading my article. Your kind compliments are well received.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 16, 2021:

Ken Burgess ~ You are most welcome. Thank you for reading my piece and offering your keen observations, with which I must agree. Always a pleasure to hear from you.

James

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on February 16, 2021:

My husband and I were homeless twice because of job changes and rising costs of housing. We didn't stay that way long but I have a heart for the homeless who are there through no fault of their own. Yet, I know that what you say is true, that there is a high percentage of drug addicts on the streets. I always thought that the organizations supposed to help the situation are taking advantage of it but I couldn't prove it and tend to think I have become cynical in my old age.

Blessings,

Denise

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 16, 2021:

Oscar Jones ~ Thank you for reading my work, and you are welcome. I appreciate your thoughtful and insightful commentary on the homeless problem.

I am on board with your ideas here: "Could it be that we are spending far more for damage control, sending money to the cities and counties to deal with this problem than it would cost to run a full scale health/drug/alcohol recovery center? What cost to have a team of medical para-professionals dispatched who are able to evaluate these individuals and rehabilitate the ones who they can through a year long boot camp? Then, perhaps the ones left in the hopeless category are dwindled to the absolute fewest numbers."

And it would be wonderful to see "Just removing people from their direst circumstances, and offering them opportunities to learn skills and earn income and to be productive."

There is no doubt that what we have now is, as you say, "Billions spent in aid; only to use the pretense of it for creating full time careers and organizations who seem to thrive off of the plight of others."

I would like to see the return of insane asylums. Supposedly, they were eliminated because it was cruel to deny people their freedom just because they were nuts. This was part of the whole anti-normal movement of the Left; that there is no such thing as normal, and no such thing as truth. Looking at the life these poor folks have on the streets, an asylum does not seem cruel to me but a haven, where the lost can be kept safe and clean, with medical care and dental care, books and television, et al.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 16, 2021:

Devika Primić ~ Thank you very much for taking the time to read my article and correspond. It is surprising how homelessness has increased in America.

L.M. Hosler on February 12, 2021:

This was a wonderful article. I makes you wonder where all that money is really going since not much of it reaches the homeless.

MG Singh emge from Singapore on February 12, 2021:

This is a nice article that gives a different facet of American life. My visits to USA I never observed these things but during my last visit I was able to see a few of the homeless hiding away in various corners.

Ken Burgess from Florida on February 12, 2021:

James,

Thank you, as someone who served overseas in some tragic parts of the world, decades ago now, I can honestly say in various parts of America things are beginning to look as bad as the worst places in the world ever did.

Oscar Jones from Monroeville, Alabama on February 12, 2021:

-JAW, I can see through reading this article, plus knowing what price tag the government has put on inner city relief for the homeless; this one question arises; Could it be that we are spending far more for damage control, sending money to the cities and counties to deal with this problem than it would cost to run a full scale health/drug/alcohol recovery center? What cost to have a team of medical para-professionals dispatched who are able to evaluate these individuals and rehabilitate the ones who they can through a year long boot camp? Then, perhaps the ones left in the hopeless category are dwindled to the absolute fewest numbers. I know their are many government sponsored substance abuse programs across the USA, but who only accept volunteer patients. This seems to be only skimming the top layer, and the real need is still the core sample of the homeless mentioned in your article. So, maybe we need to capture all of the funds for homeless programs and substance abuse and mental conditions, then turn it into a work force of medical and social entities who would in turn remove the subjects and place them into specific recovery centers. In my mind at least it would create a real result and reduction of inner-city curb dwellers. Just removing people from their direst circumstances, and offering them opportunities to learn skills and earn income and to be productive is the highest service besides the basics of maslow? food, shelter, warmth, love and let me add one- life interaction.

Is science and society so depraved and self greedy that we must leave these people in pitiful personal poverty; enslaved to the point of creating national emergency and Billions spent in aid; only to use the pretense of it for creating full time careers and organizations who seem to thrive off of the plight of others? All the money is funneled towards career professionals who are victims as well in the sense that they wouldn't exist without continuing the cause and the plight of the lost?

But with a pro-active end-goal of recovering even 50% of the lost in limbo homeless and disparaged and addicted population, we would stand well served! Payment, Jobs, and Relief Centers would be well-justified!

One last point: In my background and working with the public, I find that many of these victims are both led into this mentality of abuse by adult peers who deepen vulnerability as well as individuals locked into these underworld conditions by dependent relationship with an abuser or lifetime addict. Many of these people were innocent and once had a goal, though a portion of individuals grew up in needy and hopeless conditions and don't know anything else. Either way, A very tough challenge.

Thanks for bringing the subject out into the light where hope meets the scope and offers those who mope a rope long enough to help them cope.

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on February 12, 2021:

Hi James A Watkins when I saw about the homeless in America it surprised me.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 11, 2021:

Vivian Coblentz ~ Thank you very much for taking the time to read my article. I appreciate your keen commentary on it as well. The story you told is quite interesting, and sadly, quite common.

You and I agree "the government shouldn't FORCE our charity because then it is no longer charity, but reallocation of wealth. I also don't like to help those who refuse to help themselves."

And you said this quite well: "Yes, people are afraid to speak out and say one of the reasons people become homeless is because of their own lack of work ethic and bad choices, but it's the truth! I'm all for helping those who can't help themselves, but it should be a personal choice, not the heavy hand of government."

Amen and right on. Thanks again for your wise words.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 11, 2021:

Ken Burgess ~ Thank you for reading my work. I appreciate your most excellent ideas. Indeed, as you say, "We did away with Mental Institutions back in the 1970s and unleashed those incapable of functioning normally in society on the rest of society. Hospitals and Police deal with this tragic reality everyday, as these people cycle in and out of mental wards non-stop, risking the lives of the police and doctors who deal with them."

Yes. Instead of being in a safe, clean, orderly asylum, with medical and psychiatric care on duty, the mentally ill are either on the street, in the emergency room, or in jail, where they endanger the public, doctors and nurses, and officers of the law.

I like your idea of a new WPA, to put out-of-work people to work on public works and infrastructure projects. I'd vote for that. Well said.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 11, 2021:

Readmikenow ~ Thank you sir for coming over to check out my new piece. I sincerely appreciate your warm words on it. And you are right on the money with this: "When you have an industry created by homelessness...it will find a way to continue. Since money is involved, there is no motivation to fix the problem."

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 11, 2021:

Pamela Ogelsby ~ I so enjoy hearing from you. You always have some thoughtful thing to say, and you always offer some encouraging words. Thank you for reading my work. I will keep keeping on as long as I am able.

Vivian Coblentz on February 11, 2021:

What an eye-opening article! I never realized that homelessness had become a lucrative industry. WOW! Like you, I extend charity whenever possible, but the government shouldn't FORCE our charity because then it is no longer charity, but reallocation of wealth. I also don't like to help those who refuse to help themselves. I once tried to help a girl who was in my daughter's class because her mom was a single parent living in government housing. The mom always sent her to our house hungry so we'd feed her. When we'd take the girl with us, the mom would never feed her before she left so we'd buy her food. We paid her way everywhere and gave her tons of nice clothes my daughter could no longer wear. The mom quit her low-paying job, just because she didn't like it, without first finding a new one. When her daughter asked her to take her to church, we invited them to ours. The mom let me pray with her, and she wept and asked God into her life. Yet, she couldn't bring herself to get out of bed on Sunday morning. We gave them a devotional they could do together, but the mom just continued living the life of an unmotivated laze ball and bemoaned her lot, though she had enough motivation to take advantage of every entitlement program available. So, yes, people are afraid to speak out and say one of the reasons people become homeless is because of their own lack of work ethic and bad choices, but it's the truth! I'm all for helping those who can't help themselves, but it should be a personal choice, not the heavy hand of government.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 11, 2021:

KC McGee ~ Thank you for taking the time to read my work. I can appreciate your zeal. And I cannot argue with this that you wrote: "Why is there homelessness in America on such a mass scale in blue states.? Because the worthless low life marxist democrats run those states."

Ken Burgess from Florida on February 11, 2021:

"Homelessness is not driven primarily by high housing costs, but rather by three interrelated phenomena: addiction, mental illness, and permissive public policies. The truth is that homelessness is not primarily a housing problem but a human one. "

Agree with this statement. We did away with Mental Institutions back in the 1970s and unleashed those incapable of functioning normally in society on the rest of society. Hospitals and Police deal with this tragic reality everyday, as these people cycle in and out of mental wards non-stop, risking the lives of the police and doctors who deal with them.

And for the other (larger percentage) of people who are homeless who are capable other than having no purpose or no hope, we live in a society that gives them none. FDR handled this problem by giving the people a purpose, and the nation built Bridges, Dams, Highways and Retaining Walls across the country.

We could do that again, the nation desperately needs its bridges retaining walls, roads rebuilt, airports and dams as well in many cases... but instead we do nothing, because it is not acceptable to have such programs where we ask people to work for what they get today.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 11, 2021:

Frank Rooks ~ Hello! Thank you for visiting and commenting. And you are quite welcome. I appreciate your kind compliments. You are right on the money that "when the government pushed them out of hospitals with no real access to mental health it served to advance the homeless problem."

Readmikenow on February 11, 2021:

I think you did a great job on the article. When you have an industry created by homelessness...it will find a way to continue. Since money is involved, there is no motivation to fix the problem. It is just going to get worse. Your article provides a lot of good information on the topic.

James A Watkins (author) from Chicago on February 10, 2021:

T ~ Thank you for the visitation and being my first commenter. I appreciate you reading my work and your insightful remarks.

You ask the question of the month: "why then are American corporations giving billions of dollars to BLM, a radical pressure group that embraces a vista of controversial, extremist positions not the least of which is the destruction of the traditional family?"

Hmmm . . . could it be that they are beholden to China, and Globalism, have zero loyalty to America, and in fact see America as an idea that is past its time?

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on February 10, 2021:

This is an excellent article in my opinion. Homelessness is a huge issur, yet there are no good solutions happening at this time. I like how you carefully addressed each aspect of this problem that is growing and surely not going away any time soon. Keep spreading the message, James.

KC McGee from Where I belong on February 10, 2021:

Why is there homelessness in America on such a mass scale in blue states.? Because the worthlessy low life marxist democrats run those states. Now that the low life marxist democrats scum are in full control of America you will now see it begain thrroughout the entire country in the coming months and the next two to three years. Illegal alien will flood our borders and marxist low life democrats will welcome them in by the millions. Covid 19 will spread like wild fire because of them. Thanks to that criminal biden and the low life marxist bitch harris the best days of America are gone. All because the ELECTION WAS STOLEN BY MARXIST DEMOCRAT LOW LIFE SCUM.

Resist these BASTARDS.

fran rooks from Toledo, Ohio on February 10, 2021:

James, what a great in-depth article! I wish I knew the answer to address the subject. Greater minds than mine can't seem to solve it but it must be somehow resolved. I also believe that when the government pushed them out of hospitals with no real access to mental health it served to advance the homeless problem. Thank you for your article.

T on February 10, 2021:

“The best way to prevent homelessness isn’t to build new apartment complexes or pass new tax levies but to rebuild the family, community, and social bonds that once held communities together.”

Well tell me why then are American corporations giving billions of dollars to BLM, a radical pressure group that embraces a vista of controversial, extremist positions not the least of which is the destruction of the traditional family?

Homelessness in this country will never be prevented because today’s societal institutions actually care far less about the problem than about their own wealth and power and that is only getting worse as their power and influence grows so homelessness will continue to get worse.