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A Candle in the Wind

Am sure everyone felt hurt when Floyd was killed. But personally I can't express myself any better than with a pen and paper.

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"Reggae is mine; Reggae is mine yeh, yeh. Reggae is mine yeeeh, yeh, yeh, yeh!" Humanly speaking men love to own something. Partially or wholly, owning an item, an asset makes us feel more close to being esteemed of who we are. But this being to the extreme, I put a benefit of doubt in what exactly the late Lucky Dube was thinking when he wrote the lyrics of this song. The personalization of a music genre clearly describes the faith one has in specific type of music and in this particular case, Reggae music as a lifestyle more precisely the Rastafarian lifestyle. Reggae music as a genre that started from Jamaica with one notably popular pioneer, the late Bob Marley and other Rastas preached the gospel of the Rastafarian lifestyle with Reggae music at the center of it all to the entire globe and to all their descendants.

Lucky Dube's biography

But who really was Lucky Dube? Lucky Phillip Dube was a South African born from Ermelo, Transvaal, but today called Mpumalanga. Raised by a single mother, he soon joined his brother's band to start his music career. Born on 3rd August 1964, his parents had separated before his birth. He joined school, but had to support his family financially and hence he once worked as a gardener something that limited his studies. Inspired by Peter Tosh, Dube started his Reggae music career in 1984 with his cousin's band. Right around the same time his music career blossomed, there was a great demand for anti-racism music. The racism in South Africa was so high that black children had different play grounds from white children and until this day the Apartheid policy is part of the Uganda's History classs syllabus, stories that brought the rise of one of the world's largest icon, Nelson Madiba Mandela. Police reports suggest that carjackers who mistook him for a foreigner shot him dead on the evening of 18th October 2007 after dropping off his children at their uncle's place. What a loss!

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a-candle-in-the-wind

The movement of Reggae music in Africa is quite unclear as to when it started, but one can certainly agree that this icon influenced the way Africans perceived Reggae music and the Rastafarian way of life. Most of his popular songs, back to my roots, different colors-one people, prisoner, hand that giveth, and slave, still up to this day depict what transpired at the time. The most fascinating and eye catching moments where the stage performances every time Lucky Dube's band performed, the energy and love for Reggae music was witnessed every time they performed, I mean each band member had a role to play at preaching the message of love, brotherhood and ending racism in South Africa. Dube as the main character of the band lead the backup singers, usually three, all playing to the tune of the instrumentalists. All these made it almost easy to dance to Reggae music and in-between songs, when the drums stopped; he made a few statements about his dream of unity and love. Sometimes the backup ladies got a break and Dube took it on all by himself with the instrumentalists taking us through his endlessly loved Reggae songs.

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In current life, the deaths of George Floyd got me thinking how Lucky Dube would feel about this thought that human beings have failed to repress. And this would still call for another candle to light this dark world racism creates. But whom do we have to save us this time from something our fallen soldiers fought so hard to take with them to their graves. The Globe has enough weight on its shoulders to cater for extra load from riots and the suffering racism brings to the unfortunate. Just like Bob Marley said, "Lets get together and feel alright" Whether black or white, brown or pink, no man is a island. So please make every life that died fighting for racism worth it.....