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Drip System Irrigation For Container Gardens

Gardening is my second passion. I love to watch seed turn to living plant and flower evolve into an edible thing. Spring enchants me.

Drip System Irrigation for Container Gardens

A few plants in my container garden enjoy a watering delivered by tubes attached to a drip system.

A few plants in my container garden enjoy a watering delivered by tubes attached to a drip system.

Watering Made Easier

Recently, I installed a drip irrigation system in my container garden to help with watering.

Hauling water from the kitchen sink to the patio is a lot of work -- several times a week. It becomes a twice daily chore come summertime. Thinking about how I could lessen this burden and still provide adequate moisture had me in a quandary. There has got to be a way to make watering easier! I know that you can set up a drip irrigation system in a yard that is equipped with a spigot and garden hose -- but what DO I do about an area with no easy access to water, like my container garden?

I discussed this with several gardening pros and the answer to my problem was somewhat solved. I purchased and set up a drip watering system with a submersible electric water pump.

My drip irrigation system is still in the early stages of set up and not very attractive at the moment. When the plants grow larger, they will cover up this unsightly tubing and it won't matter much. This system will enable me to water them all at the same time and insure that they each have enough of this precious liquid directed at their root systems.

Let me show you how easy this DIY project is, what I used, and how I did this.

The Benefits Of Drip Irrigation Systems - For Watering Your Garden

This video produced by Home Depot is an excellent explanation of how your garden would benefit from a drip irrigation system for watering. I found it simple and very helpful with even more tips about this easy to assemble project. Although the system I have discussed above uses a submersible pump a more common system is attached directly to a water source as you will learn in this video.

The Benefits of a Drip Irrigation System The Home Depot

What Supplies Do I Need For A Drip System? - Tubing And Connectors

I consulted an expert at the hydroponic store near my home for the supplies I needed to set up a drip irrigation system. He recommended a few feet of vinyl tubing and connectors then gave me some pointers on how the system operated once it was assembled. He was really helpful! We lined the tubing up on the floor of the shop and he kept adding feet until I told him that looked about right!

Start your project by measuring the garden area you want to build your watering system for before you start! This could have been disastrous. Luckily I had more than enough tubing when I set it up.

One of the first things he said I would need was several feet of thick, vinyl tubing. This is necessary for the drip system's main water feeding line. This tubing will be the foundation for the entire system. The tube should be about 3/8" to 1/2" wide and sturdy enough to withstand not only the water pressure but exposure to sun, the elements, and soil. It will be laying around in the containers (or garden) and open to sun exposure so it needed to be good quality. It has to wrap around the entire garden area and back to the place where I would be installing the pump. I have a 9.5' by 4.5' area so I needed about 30'. The tubing would then be connected in a circular fashion so I would also need a 1/2" tee fitting connector. The circular design would enable the water pressure to be consistent throughout the unit.

I would need several feet of tubing to connect this loop to the water pump so I needed to make sure I had enough supply to cover the area I was installing the system in.

From there he recommended smaller tubing for the drip lines that would run from the main water supply line to the plants themselves. Each of these lines needs to be the same exact length whether the main supply water line is directly over the plant or a foot away. Controlling the water pressure so it is balanced requires even, consistent output for this to be successful.

Tools And Supplies For DIY Watering System

Tools And Supplies For DIY Watering System

Tools And Supplies For DIY Watering System

Diagram - Drip Irrigation System - Mapping And Setting Your Water Lines

Drip Irrigation System Diagram For Garden

Drip Irrigation System Diagram For Garden

Diagram Your Garden

If you use this diagram as an example of how to set your drip irrigation system's lines around your garden it will make it easier to place them for your specific needs. This is my container garden map. Consider them either in pots or ground from the diagram for your planning. Every garden is different. A variety of plants will have diverse needs for their watering. Use several drippers for trees and shrubs or just one bubbler for smaller herbs or vegetables.

You can see where I have extra drippers set for my peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers. These plants require more water and the extra lines helps provide that for them.

This diagram is a baseline for either the pump driven irrigation or a garden hose fed. The set up for the drip lines is the same. If you want to run additional tubing from the single lines coming from the main feed, that is possible, but make sure they are all of the same length. You must keep the water pressure balanced.

The large grey line is the main tubing and the smaller tubing is represented by the arrows. I cut all of my tubing the same length before I started so I didn't have to wonder how long to cut each individual line. I measured the longest line needed and used that as a guide.


Drip System Installation - Step By Step

Using a checklist is a smart way to organize your project. Having the right supplies and information ahead of time will get your project completed and get that drip system watering as soon as possible. I would rather spend time in my garden then running around looking for tools and materials!

Gather needed tools first so they are handy for you when you start connecting everything.

Scissors or Wire Cutters - for cutting lines and a Hole Puncher

In order of how you need them -- gather and assemble the following supplies.

  1. 1/2" Tubing - enough to circle your garden and a line for the water pump if you need to use one for your patio garden.
  2. 1/4" tubing for the drip lines - Cut each line in 12" - 18" sections. Don't forget to add enough lines for several drips on trees and heavy feeding plants and flowers
  3. T-Connector Fitting - If you are using a water pump this connects directly to the pump. If you will be using a garden hose a hose connection will also be needed.
  4. Barbed Connectors - One for each drip line attached to the main water feed line. Buy several extras in case you apply a little too much pressure. They will bend and split if you handle them roughly.
  5. Drippers and Bubblers - Gather enough of these to supply directly to your plants. Remember - again - you will need several for trees, bushes, and heavy feeding plants. These can be a bit fragile. Have an extra supply on hand if you damage one.

Drip System Assembly Pieces and Tubing

Drip System Assembly Pieces & Tubing

Drip System Assembly Pieces & Tubing

Assorted Bubbler Choices for Drip Watering

There are several options when it comes to water disbursement in a drip system. I could use a bubbler with a stake built in to it attached to the smaller lines or I can couple a dripper in between the line to create a more streamlined unit. The first choice is the one I agreed would fit my container garden's needs. Having the bubbler feeding directly to the plant I would not have to angle the main line around where the water supply would be most adequate. I would only have to place the stake near the root of the plant and I would know for certain the plant would get its proper amount of water.

The advice my pro gave me on the lines was to cut them all the same length and to space them at even intervals through out the main line. I was to punch a hole in the main and drive in barbed connectors in order to attach the smaller lines to it. From there your bubblers will be connected to the ends of the smaller lines.

The reasoning behind the even spacing is to balance the flow of water through out the line. As the lines are fed by the pump there will be a steady output and this keeps the pressure consistent from start to finish. A line that is shorter or longer than the rest may interrupt the water flow and plants at the end side will not get their fair share. Gravity will draw out to the easiest path and flood one plant and starve the other.

Bubbler Stakes

Bubbler Stakes

Bubbler Stakes

Barbed Couplings, Bubblers - Hole Punch For Tubing

The barbed connectors will be about 2" long and will settle snugly into the smaller lines of the drip system. You will need to punch a hole large enough for the connector to fit.

There are separate requirements for trees and shrubs than one would use for a container garden like mine. Trees and shrubs may require up to three or four bubblers where a small herb in a container may only require one.

Raindrip And Rain Bird - Watering Made Easy - Drip System Components

If you have an odd set up to your garden area, it would be best to order the pieces separately and assemble it yourself according to your garden's needs and design. Raindrip and Rain Bird make watering very easy with the products available for adding a system to your yard.

Drip Irrigation System TIP: Draw up your garden with the plants you have set already and ones you want to add later on. This can give you a visual for the list you need to make sure you have the right length of both tubing and the smaller parts. Remember 2 to 3 spouts for trees and larger shrubs, 1 for smaller items such as ornamental flowers or vegetables.

If you would rather not have to wander your local hardware store in search of all the components needed for this project, there are pre-assembled drip irrigation kits available. This image is the Rain Bird Patio Kit.

The Rain Bird Patio watering kit is a great way to get started with a quality set up and it has many elements that would enable you to tailor fit a watering system to your gardening area. The kits come with a length of 1/4" tubing. This system also includes a hose attachment if you do have a garden hose near by. The connectors and stakes that come with this package will feed 10 planters.

I used one of these a few years ago and I was amazed how easily it all fit together.

Rain Bird Patio Watering Kit - Great Starter Kit

The Rain Bird Drip System Components. This handy kit contains every thing needed to run a drip system through a small garden. Accessorize as needed to include a larger area. This kit will deliver water to up to ten plantings.

The Rain Bird Drip System Components. This handy kit contains every thing needed to run a drip system through a small garden. Accessorize as needed to include a larger area. This kit will deliver water to up to ten plantings.

Adding The Drippers - And Bubblers

Drip tubing and bubbler stakes in garden pot.

Drip tubing and bubbler stakes in garden pot.

Ecoplus Submersible Pump - For Drawing Water

The electric water pump we decided to feed the drip system with is a submersible model. The unit is dropped into a barrel or container large enough to hold the pump and a lot of water and it is let run for a few minutes. I was advised not to this piece of equipment ever run dry so it would continue performing well for me over time. The pump is quiet. It runs a steady stream of water through the main hose efficiently enough to supply all of my plants with a good dose of water in a short time. I have it set in a deep container for the moment. I will upgrade when I can to a small water barrel so I can use it to eventually pump rainwater.

Drawing water into the lines of my drip system was a large concern with this project. This Ecoplus Submersible Pump solved the riddle for me. I mentioned above that I have no supply on my patio for convenience. Attached to my container garden's drip system this pump will adequately supply the water I need in a consistent manner with little inconvenience. I just drop it in a deep welled container and turn it on. Make sure you are careful when you are operating this pump. Water and electricity do not go well with one another. Unplug and drain when not in use.

Watering Garden Before Drip System And After...

Watering Garden Before Drip System And After...

Watering Garden Before Drip System And After...

Garden Showing Drip Irrigation System Set Up

Garden Showing Drip Irrigation System Set Up

Garden Showing Drip Irrigation System Set Up

Image of the Reservoir For My Drip System

Image of the Reservoir For My Drip System

The Watering Cycle

For Your Garden Plants

Because my garden is in a desert, I have a water cycle that is twice a day during the summer months. I do notice my plants drooping in full sunlight but standing tall when the sun passes over for the day and the temperatures start to fall. This is normal in very hot regions. I can tell you the best times for watering any plant is early in the morning around 4:30 am. This is when the roots are most productive.

Helping them along with a good supply of water in balanced supply will help them grow strong, produce desired flowers, fruits, and vegetables. Over watering can be as harmful as under watering, so pay attention to what your plants are telling you. It is common practice to check the soil about 5" down to test for moisture. If the dirt is moist, skip watering for the day. Obviously if it is dry, watering is recommended.

I still am soaking the pots every couple of days by hand with a sprinkler can, but the drip system is delivering a three time a week drip watering which adds to their development.

The container I have the pump set in is filled twice when I do my watering and it goes rather quickly. The pump forces a lot of water through so I have to keep an eye on it. I let it feed the first fill of the reservoir then shut it off and refill it again. I have the container tipped so the water level is as deep as possible. I would love to drop a barrel on the patio but I have some new arrangements to make before that happens!

I have installed this drip system and it is working almost perfectly. I do not have a great deal of experience with a project like this but it is working just fine for what I needed it for. I say it is almost perfect because -- like I said in the opening -- I have somewhat solved my problem. By somewhat I mean my plants have their watering tubes but I am still having to haul water to the container for my water pump. This is not a that serious of an issue as it means I will no longer be disturbing tender roots with heavy loads of water and soil erosion will be reduced.

I mentioned above that I live in the desert. This brings an added hazard to my garden with heat and sun exposure. While I would love to tell you that this maintains my garden all year round, I cannot. The summer sun here blisters my plants and kills a few of them by the beginning of the hot months. Through out the cooler months this drip irrigation system works like a charm and I am able to keep veggies and flowers producing until the weather changes again.

Your results will vary depending on your climate.

Check back after a bit for updates and new information. This is an experiment at the moment and I will be working on perfecting it so that it benefits my garden and yours for years to come!

Thank you for your visit today!

Guestbook Comments - And Review

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on February 02, 2014:

@Donna Cook: I wish you all the best with your new garden! I hope it brings you a lot of love and tasty goodies... It is a bit of hard work in the beginning, but it is such a rewarding project. =) Thank you for your visit and comments.

Donna Cook on February 02, 2014:

Fantastic lens! I'm planning my first container garden and this info will be very useful.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on October 24, 2013:

@kepezzo: I love orchids! A misting system would benefit them, too.

I am moving to a place where I will have access to a spigot, but will still set up a drip system. I think it's a gentler way to water and it conserves h2o, too. Thank you for your visit and comments! =)

kepezzo on October 24, 2013:

It is a great idea and great lense, my wife has a lot of orchids and it would be a good idea to water them automatically.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on October 14, 2013:

@silla lm: You are welcome! It served me well this summer until the new neighbors moved in under me...

silla lm on October 14, 2013:

Thanks for this DIY guide, I had no idea how to make my own drip irrigation system!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on July 22, 2013:

@paynui: It is a blessing! Thank you for stopping in, paynui.

paynui on July 21, 2013:

We have just come out of a drought and drip irrigation is the way to go.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on July 19, 2013:

@SavioC: Thank you for your visit!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on July 19, 2013:

@GardenerDon: It takes time to adjust the watering. Keep a good eye on it the first few weeks and you can see where it is working and make adjustments where needed.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on July 19, 2013:

@LeslieMirror: This would be a great idea for her garden!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on July 10, 2013:

@vicky71: Thank you for the visit and comment!

vicky71 on July 10, 2013:

Drip Irrigation is a fantastic technique. Israelis made their deserts fertile with drip irrigation. You can save on water wastage. Thanks..Great Read.

LeslieMirror on July 04, 2013:

I'll definitely make my mom read this article, as she drives me crazy worrying everyday that her flowers will die because of the drought.

Gardener Don on June 28, 2013:

Great instructions. My first attempt was not so successful as I failed to recognize that different size plants require different amounts of watering, so I was drowning some & starving others. One size doesn't fit all here!

SavioC on June 26, 2013:

Very well put out lens and very helpful. This system helps saving in large amounts of water too.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 24, 2013:

@urbanhomefarm: You are welcome! Thank you for stopping by and taking time to comment! Appreciate it!

urbanhomefarm on June 24, 2013:

This is a great way to facilitate our tasks as a gardener and help people to grow more of their own food!

Thanks for taking time to write this lens!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 23, 2013:

@tfsherman lm: -- You are welcome! Thank you for your visit! =)

tfsherman lm on June 23, 2013:

What an informative lens! Thanks! I really wanted to know more about drip irrigation, and it's all here.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@DLeighAlexander: Thank You!!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@lesliesinclair: You are welcome! Thanks for your visit!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@Northerntrials: I do still soak the soil down 2 times a week by hand. This is a great way to get them a quick drink if I am limited on time and don't want to hassle with individual watering. I did add a little liquid feed about 3 weeks ago. A weak solution, but in the future I will feed by hand. Appreciate you sharing your thoughts here!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@Painxxto: Thank you! Appreciate that!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@Wayne Rasku: Right on - Thanks for the comment and visit! Let me know how it goes!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@SusanDeppner: Thanks, Susan! =)

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@BarbaraCasey: One plant is all you need to get started! =) Thanks for your comments!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 20, 2013:

@anonymous: You are welcome! Thanks for the comment =)

anonymous on June 19, 2013:

Excellent lens! I've been reading a lot about using hydroponics lately. Thanks for making it easy to understand!

BarbaraCasey on June 19, 2013:

So far I've got one sweet basil plant on my balcony... and now I know what to do when I add more container herbs and veggies. Thanks for such great detail.

Susan Deppner from Arkansas USA on June 19, 2013:

Love the diagram - and what a great way to water! Thanks for sharing!

Wayne Rasku on June 19, 2013:

Well written details. I really need to do this as my next project. Your article has saved me a lot of work on the research. Thanks!

Painxxto on June 18, 2013:

Excellent lens! I'm agronomical engineer and let me tell you that you have a great piece of information and very useful.

Northerntrials on June 18, 2013:

I have a few things to say about this systems in your setup that you may not have realized or are just getting to it. 1: the different plants in your setup require differing amounts of water and just varying the amount and type of drippers per pot may not be enough. Having two systems would be better you can separate the drier herbs from the water hog tomatoes. 2: Feeding - I assume you are using only water because fertilizer and submersible pumps do not work so well. Then again with so many different plant types feeding one formula would be difficult.

I love the concept. I am happy you are looking at a rainwater collection system. Rock on. I may be doing something similar for my deck plants that never seem to survive a day without my attention. Thanks

lesliesinclair on June 18, 2013:

You provide everything we need to know to set up one of these systems on our own. Thanks for the clear explanation.

DLeighAlexander on June 14, 2013:

Great idea! Like the part about reducing soil erosion too.

anonymous on June 13, 2013:

like it

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 10, 2013:

@gottaloveit2: It helps. Love your comment! Thanks for the visit!

gottaloveit2 on June 10, 2013:

Excellent idea. I kill more plants than I get to survive - I always forget to water!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 10, 2013:

@katiecolette: You are welcome, Irina! Thanks for visiting, Lady! =) Appreciate your comments!

katiecolette on June 10, 2013:

Thanks for sharing your idea. What a time saver!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 08, 2013:

@CoachGary: You are welcome! Thanks for the visit!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 08, 2013:

@LUMOSE: Thank you! =)

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 08, 2013:

@SheGetsCreative: I bet you are excited to get your garden in. Let me know how your system works out! Thanks for the visit and comment!

LUMOSE on June 07, 2013:

Great lens.

CoachGary on June 06, 2013:

Wow thanks for the very thorough description

Angela F from Seattle, WA on June 06, 2013:

We just made elevated garden beds and planted a whole bunch of veggies over the weekend. Phase II will be to add drip irrigation. Thanks for the tips!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 02, 2013:

@ValerieJoy: They certainly like the new watering format! Thank you for your comments!

Valerie Smith from New Zealand on June 01, 2013:

Very nice lens. Drip irrigation is a great way to go to keep your plants happy and healthy

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 01, 2013:

@the-gadgeteer: All you have to do is attach it to a garden hose attachment and let her rip! Appreciate your comment!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 01, 2013:

@RogerBonger: Its a simple system. Gathering the elements and getting around to it was the hard part. =) Thanks for your visit and comment!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 01, 2013:

@amandascloset0: You are welcome!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on June 01, 2013:

@lionmom100: Thank you for your comments and visit!

the-gadgeteer on June 01, 2013:

Great info, lots of details. I don't have the same problem as I have a yard, but have been thinking about doing a drip system hooked up to the hose so some details will be different. Mine would be more for saving water rather than ease, but same difference!

RogerBonger on May 31, 2013:

Thank you for the insight. I have been wanting to do this.

amandascloset0 on May 30, 2013:

Love these ideas!! Thanks for posting!

lionmom100 on May 30, 2013:

I have two container systems for pots in front and back. I have on off emitters os that if I am not using a line, I don't have to use that water. Works nicely.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 29, 2013:

@ItayaLightbourne: Thank you! =) Appreciate the comment!

Itaya Lightbourne from Topeka, KS on May 28, 2013:

Wonderful idea for container gardens! I have mine set up near the water hose so that I don't have to haul my water. Otherwise, I'd probably have to do something similar to your awesome watering system. :)

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 28, 2013:

@happynutritionist: Thanks Happy! Appreciate your visit!

happynutritionist on May 28, 2013:

What an excellent idea! I do container gardening on my sunny deck, the rest of my property is very shady so sun loving vegies etc. are container grown. Love this...deserves the purple star it received.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 28, 2013:

@Northerntrials: You are welcome! I meant to install this when I moved in and never got around to it. No time like the present. It's best to build it while the garden is small. This reduces the risk of disturbing sensitive plants. Thanks for your visit and comment!

Northerntrials on May 26, 2013:

This is a solution I've always had on my to do list. After reading your lens , it has brought it farther up on my list. Thanks.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 26, 2013:

@Erin Mellor: I was surprised how easy this was. I had an expert set up the last one but this round I wanted to do myself. It's like assembling a puzzle. Thanks for visiting!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 26, 2013:

@suepogson: I will do that, Sue! Thank you for your suggestion and visit!

suepogson on May 26, 2013:

These are really clear details of a very good ideas Please post a follow up picture of how the pots are looking in a couple more months. Great lens.

Erin Mellor from Europe on May 26, 2013:

I'm plucking up the courage to do something like this. Your approach seems more achievable than some of the highly engineered systems I've looked at.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 25, 2013:

@lgOlson: Just pay attention to the pump when you turn it on for cycling. I have mine plugged into a power strip inside my sliding glass door. The chord is about 4 feet long so there is plenty of length for the power source. When the water level gets low, just switch it off and refill the reservoir. You'll hear the change in pitch from the pump. Do not walk away and let it run. Easy, breezy! =) Thanks for the comment and visit!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 25, 2013:

@Julia1000: Or busy ones! ;) Thanks for dropping by the garden today!

L Olson from Northern Arizona on May 25, 2013:

I'm glad you did this, as I have the same problem and wondered how it would work. The big issue for me, and you is how to get the water to whatever system we set up, if you don't have a water faucet near by. I think I might try your solution though and worry about that later...thanks!

Julia1000 on May 25, 2013:

Very comprehensive lens. Drip watering is great for lazy gardeners like me :)

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 24, 2013:

@Cynthia Haltom: =) Lucky gal! I imagine things grow pretty well where you live now. Thanks for sharing your comments today!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 24, 2013:

@lionmom100: That makes sense having the main line circular - that's what the hydro guy had suggested. I would love to see your project when you are finished! Thank you so much for visiting today and sharing your comments!

lionmom100 on May 23, 2013:

I have my pots set up on drip. Fortunately, this year I have two new raised beds so I can just run some drip lines through the beds. One other tip I have used is to form a circle with your entire drip system. That way water is going in both directions throughout the system and ends up evening out the pressure throughout. I am in a new home and am just completing this little project now and I had to replace a bunch of tubing. Next step is to put on some kind of timer.

Cynthia Haltom from Diamondhead on May 23, 2013:

I had one of these systems when I lived in Washington, now I back where watering is not an issue, it usually rains at night and I never have to think about watering.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 23, 2013:

@KamalaEmbroidery: Thanks for the visit! That is exactly what I have been doing to bring water to my garden. You will still have to carry buckets to the water container but you won't have to water individually. I am working on a unit to attach to the faucet. Will up date that when I figure that issue out! Appreciate your comments!

KamalaEmbroidery on May 23, 2013:

I need to do something like this. I'm carrying water for my patio plants from the kitchen sink through the living room right now. time consuming and messy when I slosh it. Also it's a problem when I'm away and especially now that the weather is dry and warm. Thanks for the instructions and photos.

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 22, 2013:

@hovirag: You betcha I will! Thanks for the visit and comment, hovirag!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 22, 2013:

@anonymous: Thank you, Tipi! I appreciate your kind words and your visit today!

I have to tell you - this was a thought in process until last week when my car just kind of drove into that parking lot. I am so glad it did. For one, I wanted to see this new store and two, I had this challenge on my agenda for awhile. It was time to get the components and complete the project. It cost me less than $50 to do this and it will last a long time if I keep it maintained. I will add a few more pieces to this lens in time. Have a great day my dear!

anonymous on May 22, 2013:

Now this makes so much sense since containers do dry out so fast....and a very well done DIY for all to follow on their way to enjoying their plants more with less work...its a natural and I'm sure you'll get it perfected along the way, though pretty great as is! Congratulations on your purple star! :)

hovirag on May 22, 2013:

it's a great idea as it save you time and energy - and you still can talk to the plants if you want to :) maybe at weeding times?

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 22, 2013:

@hntrssthmpsn: ;) Glad to have you stop by! I love the drip system but there is something to that personal time spent watering and talking to each plant -- which I will still do even with the drip system. The main load is carried by the irrigation service. =) Appreciate your comments!

hntrssthmpsn on May 22, 2013:

Three cheers for less work! I love your detailed description & pictures. When I was a kid, we lived on 13 acres with two gardens and an orchard, all drip irrigated. These days, I spend more time watering my little front and back yard gardens than we ever spent on those acres of lush vegetation. Perhaps it's time I do something about that...

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 22, 2013:

@anonymous: Thank you, Sara! Appreciate you dropping in today!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 22, 2013:

@shellys-space: I did one of these from a kit in my 2010 garden but this garden needed its own modified system. They are great. For your shrubs I would recommend a drip hose. My mother uses one for her vegetable garden, irises, and grapevines. It works really well. Thanks for your visit!

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 22, 2013:

@takkhisa: Thanks takkhis! Appreciate your visit here!

Shelly Sellers from Midwest U.S.A. on May 22, 2013:

Ria, I was just thinking how I needed to buy a drip system to water my bushes out front. We had water restrictions in our City last year and a friend recommended a root watering tool, which looks like the same thing as a drip system!

anonymous on May 22, 2013:

Great Article! easy to see what to do!

Takkhis on May 22, 2013:

Great lens and it does deserve a Purple star! Congratulations! :)

Maria Burgess (author) from Las Vegas, Nevada on May 21, 2013:

@flinnie lm: Thanks flinnie! If you have any leaks in the system, just pull a pot up under it and enjoy the watering! =) Appreciate your visit today!

Gloria Freeman from Alabama USA on May 21, 2013:

Hi great job, I also have a lot of container to water, this will cut down on all the work I have to do in my garden.

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