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What to Do With a Bag of Mung Beans

A Special Educator by profession. When not busy teaching & mentoring student teachers, Susin likes to experiment with DIY eco-projects.

Powerful Mung Beans

Mung beans - also known as green gram beans; green grams or in some Southeast Asian countries, simply, green beans - pack a mean source of nutrition.

Other than being rich in antioxidants, mung beans are a great source of protein, potassium, magnesium, fibre, folate and vitamin B6. In addition, they may aid in weight loss. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, mung beans have cooling properties, meaning, they help to clear the body's heat, expel toxins and reduce inflammation.

Now sometimes, we may get a packet of ingredients, just to use a small amount of it or use it only once. If you have a packet of mung beans leftover in the pantry, you can try some the following ways to use them to their fullest potential.

Take note, however, to discard any leftover mung beans or other beans that are stored for too long; that may have already attracted weevils; turned powdery, or too old to be tasty.

what-to-do-with-a-bag-of-green-beans

Make Delicious Mung Bean Soup / Porridge - Simple Version

This is a versatile dish with many variations. A basic version of this cooling dessert that helps detoxify the body is as follows.




Make a pot of delicious & nutritious mung bean soup or porridge for the entire family.

Make a pot of delicious & nutritious mung bean soup or porridge for the entire family.

The Ingredients


1. Mung Beans

2. Dried Lily Bulbs - you can get this from some provision stores or Chinese medicine halls. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Lily bulbs are viewed as having cooling properties, helping to moisten the lungs, promote calmness and sleep.

3. Pearl Sago - to use it as a thickener.

4. Black/Brown sugar and / or rock sugar

Optional: A bunch of pandan leaves knotted up to give that extra fragrance


The Steps:


1. Wash the lily bulbs and soak them for about 1/2 an hour.

2. Wash the mung beans.

Scroll to Continue

3. Place the beans and slightly softened lily bulbs in a pot of water and bring it to a boil. (Place the bunch of pandan leaves in the water if using them).

4. Boil till the beans are mushy and simmer.

5. Rinse and add in the pearl sago. Do note that the more sago added, the thicker and gooey the mung bean soup becomes. So, a little sago added is enough and adjust according to taste.

6. Simmer till the sago turns transparent, and the white tips cannot be seen. Stir the pot of soup/porridge occasionally so that the bottom of the pot does not burn.

7. Add in desired amount of rock sugar/black/brown sugar or both - I use both sometimes for a more layered taste.

Enjoy your bowl of dessert full of goodness!

Green / Mung Beans

Green / Mung Beans

Pearl Sago

Pearl Sago

Soak dried lily bulbs for about half an hour

Soak dried lily bulbs for about half an hour

Enjoy your bowl of green goodness!

Enjoy your bowl of green goodness!

Grow Mung Bean Sprouts

Sprouting mung beans is easy - it is the easiest among all beans to be sprouted successfully and in a short period of time. Below are the steps in growing mung bean sprouts at home.



what-to-do-with-a-bag-of-green-beans

Materials:

  1. A glass bottle (approximately 500ml) - some people use plastic bottles, but I prefer glass which does not leach toxins. I use an old instant coffee bottle.
  2. A cheese or muslin cloth (or a netting) that can cover over the bottle's opening. It acts as a filter for water to be drained in the sprouting process. I use a self-made net covering, from that of a garlic net bag (see pictures below).
  3. An elastic band (optional) to secure the filter over the opening. It is optional as it is easier when you drain water out of the bottle. Otherwise, you can simply hold it in place while turning the bottle over.
  4. A handful or two of mung beans. Make sure that they are still relatively fresh though they are dried beans. Old beans do not sprout well, and tend to spoil easily in the sprouting process as well.


The Steps:

  1. Grab one or two handful of mung beans into the bottle. Soak them for at least 8-12 hours. A simple way is to soak them overnight: start soaking them before going to bed and you can begin the sprouting process after breakfast, the following morning.
  2. After a night of soaking, discard the water through the filter cover of the bottle. Rinse the beans through this same filter 2-3 times. You may notice that some skins have been dislodged, and for some of these tiny yet powerful "greenies", little sprouts have emerged. It is okay.
  3. Make sure to thoroughly drain the water from the bottle. You can place the bottle in a tilted position over the kitchen sink, with the filter on. Keep the bottle in a dark area however, as the more light the beans are exposed, the greener the leaves would grow. I usually keep the bottle in a dark area in the kitchen, tilted over its original cover to collect any residual water that drains out thereafter (see pictures below). Do remember to discard the water if you are following the same.
  4. You can keep the bottle in a horizontal position, or upright after the water is drained.
  5. Repeat step number 2 and 3, for two to three times in the day, more if the climate is warmer. I live in tropical Singapore, and three times is usually what I do. I usually do the rinsing once in the morning, before or after breakfast; once in the afternoon after lunch, and once more after dinner. Repeat this over the next few days.
  6. By days two to three*, you should be able to see healthy sprouts with tiny tails of roots emerging. Some beans may not sprout and that is fine. If you would like to start "harvesting" your sprouted beans at this stage, go ahead. However, I prefer my sprouts to be a little longer and leafier.
  7. On days four to five, green leaves could be seen, and the roots would grow much longer. To keep the sprouts from becoming too thin with long hideous tails (the roots), it is recommended to place a layer of light weight over the growing sprouts. I usually leave the aesthetics aspect out, as the sprouts are still as nutritious. Once the sprouts have grown to a desired length, they can be harvested.
  8. Remove the filter and turn the bottle to collect the sprouts in a colander or a bowl. Rinse them with water. Remove any unsprouted beans and the skins. You can opt to pinch off the roots or leave them intact. They can be used immediately. Otherwise for storage, you may want to pat them dry with a kitchen towel and keep the sprouts in a container in the fridge for later use. keep the sprouts for 3-5days.

* How fast the beans will sprout may vary. Use approximations and when the sprouts have grown to a desired length, they may be harvested.

Use an old coffee bottle to sprout mung beans.

Use an old coffee bottle to sprout mung beans.

Filter cover.

Filter cover.

DIY filter - cut off part of a garlic netting bag and tie a knot at one end.

DIY filter - cut off part of a garlic netting bag and tie a knot at one end.

Green / mung beans

Green / mung beans

Soak the mung beans for at least 8 hours, or overnight.

Soak the mung beans for at least 8 hours, or overnight.

what-to-do-with-a-bag-of-green-beans
Tilt the bottle over the sink to drain out excess water, or to place it at an angle for water to be drained into the bottle cover.

Tilt the bottle over the sink to drain out excess water, or to place it at an angle for water to be drained into the bottle cover.

The skins loosen and are dislodged, and beans begin to sprout on the next day.

The skins loosen and are dislodged, and beans begin to sprout on the next day.

what-to-do-with-a-bag-of-green-beans
On Day 2-3.

On Day 2-3.

The sprouts become longer on Day 3-4.

The sprouts become longer on Day 3-4.

Ready for harvesting.

Ready for harvesting.

what-to-do-with-a-bag-of-green-beans
With roots pinched off.

With roots pinched off.

Delicious Mung Bean Spouts

The sprouts can be added in a salad, raw for that crunchy juicy taste. Alternatively they can be just as delicious, lightly steamed and drizzled with garlic and sesame oil. I enjoy my bean sprouts in stir fries and in soups. They are powerful additions to any main dish, noodles, rice, etc.


Use the sprouts in soups & noodles.

Use the sprouts in soups & noodles.

what-to-do-with-a-bag-of-green-beans

It is thoroughly enjoyable process to start and watch the growth of your own food. It may help to reduce some expenses, reduce food wastage, giving these leftovers a new lease of life!

This content reflects the personal opinions of the author. It is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and should not be substituted for impartial fact or advice in legal, political, or personal matters.

© 2022 Susin Lim

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