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Tropical Fruit Trees Around My Thailand Home

Paul has been no stranger to tropical fruit trees in East and Southeast Asia. He has lived in both Taiwan and Thailand.

My wife under our Mariam plum tree.

My wife under our Mariam plum tree.

Tropical Fruit Trees Around our Thailand Home

Before living in Taiwan in the 1970s and now in Thailand since 2007, I never came into contact with any tropical fruit trees or plants. I only had first-hand knowledge of cherry and apple trees in Wisconsin and a peach tree in Ohio.

After moving to Udon Thani City in northeastern Thailand in 2014, however, my wife and I have planted and enjoyed new and existing tropical fruit trees and plants around our home.

In this article, I first introduce our preexisting Marian plum, mangosteen, and tamarind fruit trees. Next, I describe the mango and lime trees that we have planted. Finally, I account for the banana and papaya plants that we have also planted and enjoyed.

Marian Plum Tree

My wife Suai next to our Marian Plum tree.

My wife Suai next to our Marian Plum tree.

Our Marian plum tree, also known as (AKA) plum mango, is called mabprang มะปราง in Thai. Its scientific name is ฺBouea macrophylla.

This tree in the back of our home is probably 15-20 years old and about 20 feet in height. It can be found in the Southeast Asian countries of Indonesia, Myanmar (Burma,) Thailand, Laos, and Malaysia.

The Marian plum starts blossoming at the end of December. By the latter part of January, you can start seeing small fruit on the tree. Around the end of February or beginning of March, we usually start harvesting a sweet to acidic one-two inch oval fruit that is yellow-orange in color when ripe. The harvesting continues until approximately the middle of March.

Marian plum trees require moderate moisture year long and do well when fertilized.

In addition to the fruit, the leaves can be eaten when young and used in salads.

It has the following health benefits:

  1. high in vitamin C and beta-carotene
  2. prevents and reduces the risk of cancer, diabetes, and high blood pressure
  3. strengthens the body's immunity
  4. high in calcium and phosphorus

Mangosteen Tree

Mangosteen tree in our backyard

Mangosteen tree in our backyard

The mangosteen tree AKA purple mangosteen is called mangkut มังคุด in Thai. Its scientific name is Garcinia mangostana.

Our tree is probably 15-20 years old and about 20 feet in height. It is found primarily in Southeast Asia but can also be seen in Colombia, Puerto Rico, and Florida.

The beginning of small fruit usually starts coming on our tree at the end of February. By the end of July, round deep reddish-purple fruit the size of small tangerines is ripe and ready to be picked.

In examining the fruit, the outer reddish-purple rind is inedible. After opening up the rind, you eat the white-colored inner pods. They are sweet, tangy, juicy, and somewhat fibrous.

The mangosteen tree needs temperatures of 77-95 degrees with high humidity for growing. It also needs fertilizer and soil with high moisture content. In 2020, our tree produced 100-150 fruit.

The health benefits of mangosteen include the following:

  1. highly nutritious
  2. rich in antioxidants
  3. may have anti-inflammatory properties
  4. may have anticancer effects
  5. may promote weight loss
  6. promotes a healthy immune system
Mangosteens from our mangosteen tree

Mangosteens from our mangosteen tree

Tamarind Tree

tropical-fruit-trees-around-my-home-in-thailand

Our Tamarind Tree

Our tamarind tree is called makham มะขาม in Thai. Its scientific name is Tamarindus Indica.

you cannot miss this tree because it is in front of our house and stands 25-30 feet in height. Tamarind trees originate in Southwest India and are common in Thailand.

Every year our tamarind produces a brown, pod-like fruit. After cracking the outer shell, you will enjoy a sweet, sticky pulp around a seed.

Tamarind trees have a high resistance to drought. This is good for our area that has a six-month dry season every year.

The leaves of this tree are edible and the wood can be used for furniture.

Tamarind has the following health benefits:

  1. high in B vitamins and calcium
  2. used for treating diarrhea, constipation, fever, and peptic ulcers
  3. has antioxidants and anti-inflammatories that protect against cancer, heart disease, and diabetes
Tamarind tree in our front yard.  Taken Jan 2021

Tamarind tree in our front yard. Taken Jan 2021

Mango Tree

Mango Tree three months old.  Taken 2015

Mango Tree three months old. Taken 2015

Our Mango Trees

A mango tree is called mamuang มะม่วง in Thai. Many species of mango belong to the flowering plant genus Mangifera.

We have two young trees planted in 2015 in our front yard. One is eight feet and the other seven feet in height. When fully grown, the taproot of a mango tree can descend to a depth of 20 feet in the ground. Mango trees are native to Thailand and South Asia.

Small young fruit starts growing on the trees in February. It usually takes five months for the mangoes to turn yellow and ripen. My wife and many Thai, however, also like eating the unripe green mangoes.

Mangoes are stone fruit that can be round, oval, or kidney-shaped. Our ripe mangoes are yellow, kidney-shaped, and usually two-five inches in length. When eating, you must first peel the skin and then cut the fruit off from around the inner stone.

The health benefits of mangoes include the following:

  1. low in calories and full of nutrients, particularly Vitamin C that aids immunity, iron absorption, growth, and repair.
  2. high in antioxidants.
  3. may boost immunity.
  4. may support heart health.
  5. may improve digestive health.
  6. may lower the risk of certain cancers.
Mango Tree in the front yard.  Taken Dec. 2020

Mango Tree in the front yard. Taken Dec. 2020

Our Lime Tree

Lime Tree in our front yard.  Taken Jan2021

Lime Tree in our front yard. Taken Jan2021

Our Lime Tree

Our lime tree is called manao มะนาว in Thai. It is a member of the Citrus genus.

We have one young lime tree planted in 2015 in our front yard. It is now seven feet tall and seven feet in diameter.

Although we had a few limes during the first year, a lot of fruit didn't come on the tree until 2018.

Our lime tree bears fruit year-round. The limes are green to yellow in color when ripe and vary from one-two inches in diameter.

The health benefits of lime include the following:

  1. rejuvenating skin
  2. improving digestion
  3. fighting infection
  4. helping with weight loss
  5. lowering blood sugar
  6. reducing heart disease
  7. helping prevent cancer
  8. reducing inflammation
New bananas in our front yard

New bananas in our front yard

Our Banana Plants

Our banana plants are called gluay กลัวย in Thai. They are large herbaceous flowering plants in the genus Musa.

We have several banana plants in the front and on one side of our home. Most of the plants are 15-20 feet in height. They are ubiquitous in Thailand and all tropical and subtropical areas.

Banana plants live for approximately one year or until they have produced only one large hanging cluster or bunch. They are then cut down.

From the time it starts growing, a banana plant will need eight-nine months before it stops producing new leaves. At this point, it will form a flower spike or inflorescence. Small tiers or hands will then emerge with 15-20 fingers to a hand. Three to nine tiers make up a large bunch for our banana plants. After all of the tiers have come out, the flower is cut off and used as food.

Bananas grow in a wide variety of soils and need good drainage. Overwatering a young plant will kill it.

The health benefits of bananas include:

  1. high in fiber
  2. good for heart health
  3. ease for digestion
  4. high in nutrients
  5. high in potassium
  6. good for blood pressure
  7. help fight anemia
Banana Plant in our front yard

Banana Plant in our front yard

Suai with our harvested bananas

Suai with our harvested bananas

Papaya Plant next to our home

Papaya Plant next to our home

Our Papaya Plants

Our papaya plants are called maligo มะละกอ in Thai. Its scientific name is Carica papaya and it is one of the 22 species of the genus Carica of the Caricaceae family.

We presently have three papaya plants along the side of our home. Some of the plants reach 20 feet in height. Papaya plants are common in Thailand and tropical and subtropical areas.

Papayas can be grown from seed or transplanted as seedlings. Most of our luck in growth has come from seed plants.

It usually takes around nine months for a papaya plant to grow up and produce fruit. Some plants will take two or three years to grow fruit.

When the papaya fruit is ripe, its skin will have an amber to orange hue. The fruit is spherical or cylindrical in shape and approximately 6-18 inches long.

In Thailand, people eat papaya when they are either green and unripe or ripe. The green papaya is used to make a spicy Thai salad. When eating papaya, you must first peel the skin and then remove the inner small black seeds.

Papaya prefers sandy, well-drained soil. It needs a lot of water when young but you must not overwater or it will quickly die.

The health benefits of eating papaya include:

  1. rich in fiber, Vitamin C, and antioxidants
  2. lowers cholesterol
  3. helps in weight loss
  4. boosts immunity
  5. good for diabetics
  6. great for eyes
  7. protects against arthritis
  8. improves digestion
  9. eases menstrual pain
My wife with ripe papaya

My wife with ripe papaya

Tropical Fruit Trees around Our Home

Sources

  • Healthline
  • Wikipedia

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Paul Richard Kuehn

Comments

Paul Richard Kuehn (author) from Udorn City, Thailand on January 16, 2021:

Yes, Devica, Thailand is beautiful and has so many different kinds of tropical fruit. What kind of tropical fruit does South Africa have?

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on January 16, 2021:

Thailand must be beautiful and have a variety of tropical fruit. I miss that tropical fruit from South Africa.

Paul Richard Kuehn (author) from Udorn City, Thailand on January 13, 2021:

they are very delicious and I just noticed today that my mangosteen tree is starting to get little mangosteens.

Mary Norton from Ontario, Canada on January 11, 2021:

I love these fruits. It's tastier when they come from your tree.

Paul Richard Kuehn (author) from Udorn City, Thailand on January 07, 2021:

Yes, MG, I am lucky to enjoy my tropical fruit surroundings. Do you ever make it up to Udon Thani or northeastern Thailand?

Paul Richard Kuehn (author) from Udorn City, Thailand on January 07, 2021:

Yes, I am fortunate. Have you gotten any fruit off of your orange tree and papaya plant?

Paul Richard Kuehn (author) from Udorn City, Thailand on January 07, 2021:

If you lived in Thailand, you would have many different kinds of mangoes and bananas to eat, Yes, I am lucky to enjoy the fruit here.

Paul Richard Kuehn (author) from Udorn City, Thailand on January 07, 2021:

Some day I hope to visit India and see the tropical fruit that you have. I'm happy you liked my video.

Paul Richard Kuehn (author) from Udorn City, Thailand on January 07, 2021:

Thanks for your comments. I wasn't familiar with any of this fruit until I first came to Taiwan in 1968 and then Thailand in 1996.

MG Singh emge from Singapore on January 07, 2021:

I think you're very lucky Paul, staying in such lovely surroundings with tropical fruits all around. Thailand as it is a nice place and Bangkok is part of my beat.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on January 07, 2021:

You are fortunate to be able to go out and pluck fresh fruit off of your trees. My parents, when they lived in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, always planted citrus trees in their backyard. Currently, we have an orange tree and papaya growing in our backyard.

Louise Powles from Norfolk, England on January 07, 2021:

You're lucky you get so many fruit trees where you live. I love mango's and bananas.

Chitrangada Sharan from New Delhi, India on January 07, 2021:

Great article and you have some wonderful tropical fruit trees around your home. I am familiar with all of these. What a wonderful feeling to grow our own food. Enjoyed the virtual tour video. Thank you for sharing.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on January 07, 2021:

Other than the mango, I was not familiar with most of these fruit trees. It is such a blessing to have the fruit so available. This is an interesting article.

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