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Having Trouble Starting a Toro 1500 or 1800 Power Curve Snowblower?

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Basic Troubleshooting for any Power Tool

  1. First things first, make sure the tool is plugged in and the outlet is functioning properly. Check the cord for any visible damage, like fraying or cuts.
  2. Next, take a look at the circuit breaker. If it's tripped, simply replace the fuse or reset the circuit breaker.
  3. Is the switch on the tool set to "on"? Make sure it's in the right position before moving on to the next step.
  4. The brush assembly is an important part of the tool, and if it's worn out, the tool might not start. While they are called brushes, they look like a gray rectangle of graphite. Take a look and see if it needs to be replaced. Below, I explain how to clean the rotors that connect with these brushes.
  5. If the motor appears to be damaged, it might be time to say goodbye to your trusty tool. But if it looks okay, move on to the next step.
  6. If the tool still won't start, there could be a problem with the power cord or the internal wiring. In this case, it's best to bring it to a professional for repair.

Disassembly of a Toro 1500 or 1800 Power Curve Snowblower

If you have made it through the troubleshooting steps you can do without taking your snowblower apart, you might need to look inside. Here are the basic steps to take your Toro 1500 apart.

1. Remove the handle from the snowblower. There are four bolts on the underside of the snowblower that attach the long black handle and wheels to the red snowblower unit. Remove these bolts with a 10 mm wrench or socket. These come off with a curved washer.

2. Remove the screws that fasten the red plastic over to the rest of the unit.

Remove Bolts from Handle

repair-a-toro-1500-or-1800-power-curve-snowblower

Remove Screws from Exterior Assembly

repair-a-toro-1500-or-1800-power-curve-snowblower

Exposing the Motor on a Toro 1500 Snowblower

To see the electric motor on a Toro 1500 or 1800 Snowblower continue with the following steps:

1. Remove the motor housing. After you have removed the red exterior cover, you will see a belt on one side and a black housing cover in the middle of the unit. There are screws around that housing. Remove them and the black housing cover should come right off.

Remove the Motor Housing

The black motor housing has screws on all sides of it. It sits on the top of the larger auger unit below it. There are six screws.

The black motor housing has screws on all sides of it. It sits on the top of the larger auger unit below it. There are six screws.

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Cleaning the rotor on a Toro 1500 or 1800 Snowblower

Once you have the motor housing removed, you can see the rotor and carbon brushes. This is a round copper cylinder with two gray pieces on either side. The brushes look sort of like gray erasers. The rotor should be shiny copper, but if it is dirty it will have a black streak where the brushes are making contact with it. In the photos below you will see it on the right.

To clean the rotor, insert a file and gently turn the rotor so the file rubs on the copper plate on the outside of the rotor. After a few turns, this copper should clean off and you should be able to see it shining through the black residue.

If you do not have a file, an emery board or sand paper would likely work. There is a link below for some small files that cost under $10.

Cleaning the Rotor and Carbon Brushes on a Toro Snowblower

The rotor and brushes are on the right of the motor.

The rotor and brushes are on the right of the motor.

Insert a file to gently rub away the carbon buildup. You can turn the wheel to the right of the rotor to create some movement on the rotor and clean it faster.

Insert a file to gently rub away the carbon buildup. You can turn the wheel to the right of the rotor to create some movement on the rotor and clean it faster.

This is a close up of the rotor and brushes. You should see the copper shining through the carbon buildup.

This is a close up of the rotor and brushes. You should see the copper shining through the carbon buildup.

Files for Rotor Cleaning

Safety Steps to Working on an Electric Motor

Here are some safety steps to follow before working on an electric motor:

  1. Disconnect the power: Before you do anything, make sure to unplug the motor or turn off the power at the breaker box.
  2. Use caution when handling the motor: Even when the power is off, the motor can still store electricity and pose a risk of electric shock. Use caution when handling the motor and avoid touching any electrical components.
  3. Wear personal protective equipment: To protect yourself from electric shock and other injuries, make sure to wear appropriate personal protective equipment, such as gloves and safety glasses.
  4. Be aware of your surroundings: Make sure the area around the motor is clear of any clutter or tripping hazards.
  5. Follow proper lifting techniques: If the motor is heavy, be sure to use proper lifting techniques to avoid injury.
  6. Use the correct tools: Make sure you have the proper tools for the job, and use them correctly to avoid accidents.
  7. Follow the manufacturer's instructions: Always read and follow the manufacturer's instructions for any maintenance or repair work on the motor.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2023 Woodson

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