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My Top 10 Plants To Create A Wildflower Garden

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I love pottering in the greenhouse and garden and listening to classic rock with my Labradoodle, Florrie.

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Creating a Wildflower Garden

Find out the best plants to grow to create a wildflower garden. Wildflowers are easy to grow and are low maintenance. They are hardy, resilient and well adapted to our climate and soils. They're also incredibly beautiful adding colour, structure and scent to your garden.

Many wildflowers are threatened by the erosion of their natural habitat. Growing even a small area of wildflowers contributes to their conservation and can attract a variety of insects and wildlife into your garden. Never before has it been so important to protect pollinators such as bees, and a wildflower garden is ideal to encourage them into your garden.

Wildflowers can be the solution to a ‘problem’ area of your garden that might be very dry, have poor soil or be on an incline.

You can get wildflower seed mixes specially chosen for your garden conditions. Alternatively just buy packets of the wildflowers you like from our suggestions below, mix the seed together and sow them! What could be simpler!?

Cornflower

Cornflower

Cornflower

The Cornflower is best known for its stunning sky blue colour. Also known as Bachelor's Buttons, it was once a cornfield weed. Selective breeding has turned it into a popular, easy to grow annual ideal for a wildflower border. Cornflowers are available in a variety of colours including red, purple, pink and white as well as the original blue.

Poppy

Poppy

Poppy

A great contrast to the blue of the cornflower is the vivid red common poppy. Sadly, it is slowly disappearing from fields due to the continued use of herbicides. However, drifts of poppies can often be spotted on roadside verges and wasteland. They are easy to grow, are tolerant of most soils and will add a stunning splash of colour to your wildflower garden.

Ox-eye Daisy

Ox-eye Daisy

Ox-eye Daisy

The Ox-eye daisy is one of the largest members of the daisy family. Each flower has a central yellow floret disc surrounded by 15 to 20 white petals. It is often the most dominant flower in a new wildflower garden and then struggles for space in later years as other plants become more established.

Lupins

Lupins

Lupins

Lupins are one of the more ‘showy’ flowers in a wildflower garden. Their tall flower spikes add structure and height to the border. Each flower stem is densely packed with individual flowers similar in style to a Sweet Pea. In the wild, Lupins generally have hues of blue and white, although for the garden you can get a broader range of colours including yellows, pinks and purples.

Yarrow

Yarrow

Yarrow

Yarrow has tall, flat-topped flower heads made up of many tiny, tightly-packed flowers on top of clusters of ferny foliage. The overall impact gives each flower head a creamy yellow and pink overall hue. Squeeze the flowers and they have a strong pungent smell.

Cowslip

Cowslip

Cowslip

Cowslips are one of the iconic sights of Spring. A close relative of the Primrose, the Cowslip has a cluster of bright yellow, trumpet-shaped flowers on each stem. The name Cowslip is thought to originate from the word ‘Cowslup’ as it regularly grew in the manure of farm fields. It is another wildflower that has suffered a decline due to changing agricultural practices. Thankfully, it has begun to return to the banks of new roads and coastal dunes.

Teasel

Teasel

Teasel

The Teasel is another wildflower to add height and architecture to your wildflower garden. In summer, it has spiky green flower heads with rings of purple or white on tall prickly stems. In Winter, the seed heads turn brown and are a useful source of food for birds. They also add great structure to dried flower displays.

Ragged Robin

Ragged Robin

Ragged Robin

The Ragged Robin is named after its untidy, ragged appearance. The distinctive pink flowers are shaped like a ‘snowflake’ - the five petals are each deeply divided. The Ragged Robin prefers damp marsh land and not too much competition from other plants. It looks best growing in grass.

Harebell

Harebell

Harebell

The Harebell is a good choice for the front of your wildflower garden. They have long wiry, trailing stems with delicate blue, bell-shaped flowers. Often known as ‘Scottish Bluebells’, ‘Fairies Thimbles’ or ‘Witches Bells’, they flower later in the summer so are valuable in extending the wildflower season. This stunning little flower has inspired many a writer.

Meadow Buttercup

Meadow Buttercup

Meadow Buttercup

Our final wildflower suggestion is Florrie Labradoodle’s favourite - the meadow buttercup. She loves to run through them at speed, especially when it has been raining and they are wet! The buttery yellow flowers on tall branching stems are like little bursts of sunshine!

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