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50 Winter Poems for Adults and Kids

Winter is Poetry

Winter is Poetry

Here are fifty poems about winter, including haikus, snow poems, poems for kids, poetry videos, teaching resources, songs, graphics, and photos.

"Winter Poems" are a favorite search topic on the Internet. Every year, there are tens of thousands of searches for winter poems and snow poetry. Who can explain this high demand?

Perhaps it's just the cold pushing people indoors, seeking some explanation for it all by a warm fireplace. Don't know. But what I do know is that the most popular poem in America is Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost. A rare video of Robert Frost reading this beloved poem is in this collection.


Table of Contents

Jump to Section:


Winter Haiku

Winter Season Poem

Famous Winter Poems

Snow Poems

Robert Frost Reading Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Poems for Kids

Narrative Poem for Kids

Winter Poems for Very Young Children and Kindergarten

Shakespeare

Songs about Winter

Teacher Resources

Yes, you are going to find winter poems on this page. But first, consider writing a winter poem yourself! Writing a Haiku is an easy way to start.

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Winter Haiku

Winter Haiku

Haiku About Winter

The Haiku is the easiest poetic form to begin with, and you don't have to be an accomplished poet to write one.

The Haiku is a classical poem from the Japanese tradition that uses syllables instead of poetic meters. Every Japanese Haiku is about a season of the year, either mentioned directly or by inference.

The Japanese word, kigo, means season word. The word snow, for instance, implies winter without using the word. Thus, part of the intrigue of the Japanese Haiku is in determining the season for the poem. An "a-ha" moment, if you will.

Here is an English translation of a classical Haiku from the 17th-century Japanese poet, Ikenishi Gonsui:


Bitter Winter Wind

by Ikenishi Gonsui

Bitter winter wind
ends there –
sound of the sea


In modern times, and in the English language, the traditional Haiku poem consists of three lines, as follows:

5 syllables
7 syllables
5 syllables

There is seldom any attempt at rhyming, so even the novice is off-the-hook in that regard. Writing spontaneous Haikus is a great party game idea, too, if you ever get tired of playing Charades. Keep this in mind if you are snowed in and the roads are closed. It's a great game for kids and grownups.


Winter Poem Picture

Winter Poem Picture

Famous Winter Haiku

Matsuo Basho (1644 - 1694) is considered the greatest Japanese haiku poet. Here are four of his most-loved winter haiku poems:


Winter Solitude

by Matsuo Basho

Winter solitude –
in a world of one color
the sound of wind.


Winter Garden

by Matsuo Basho

Winter garden,
the moon thinned to a thread,
insects singing.


First Winter Rain

by Matsuo Basho

First winter rain –
even the monkey
seems to want a raincoat.


When the Winter Chrysanthemums Go

by Matsuo Basho

When the winter chrysanthemums go,
there's nothing to write about
but radishes.


Roses in Winter

Roses in Winter

Scroll to Continue

Snow Poems

Want to read modern Haikus about winter? Here are two new snow poems.

Roses in Winter

by Writer Fox

Winter roses wait,
under white shroud of snowfall,
for resurrection.


Snow Trees

Snow Trees

Cloud Dust

by Writer Fox

Clouds shake white dust down –
All the trees turned to snowmen,
The eyes made of ice.



Writing a Winter Haiku is easy. Give it a try to post your original Haiku in the comment section below.

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Winter

Winter

Winter Season Poem

A winter poem reflects the dreary season and often invokes contemplation. For those searching for this kind of winter poem, I wrote this one for you. Just as winter itself is the culmination of four seasons, this poem begins with spring and takes you on the journey to the depths of winter.


Clearly Chaos

by Writer Fox

Immigrant season, empty hands
looking for work,
finding promise in pockets of dust,
bringing back the birds,
competitive as pretty sisters
bickering in birdsong, speaking of seeds.
Spring, wetting itself,
wipes muddy feet at the door
then passes through without notice.

Insatiable season, Summer
smothering like a jealous wife,
top-heavy with tomatoes.
Her kitchen ovens turned on high
send you out to the porch,
rocking a breeze to the scribble of squirrels
on the green-smell of grass
until nightfall
when you can sneak away from her.

Hooligan season, Autumn
attacks splashing red paint, always outside of the lines.
Teenage-tantrum of seasons
full of himself, spitting ice on the roses,
flaying the branches of trees,
ending in sepia, like old photographs
fading brown-on-brown
thrown down in a mess in a hurry to finish

before Winter moves in
acting like he owns the place.
Relentless season, Winter-
curfew clearing the streets,
sending everyone home before dark.
It is clearly chaos.
But if, one year, the earth stalled in its
tedious turning, catching its skirt on the cusp,
refusing the winding to Winter,
would we not scream at the sky?
Would we not beg it for snow?
It is not that we want it;
but it is what we know.




' Winter-curfew clearing the streets'

' Winter-curfew clearing the streets'

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Winter

Winter

Famous Winter Poems

January

by John Updike

The days are short
The sun a spark
Hung thin between
The dark and dark.
Fat snowy footsteps
Track the floor
And parkas pile up
Near the door.
The river is
A frozen place
Held still beneath
The trees' black lace
The sky is low.
The wind is gray.
The radiator
Purrs all day.


Snow

by E. E. Cummings (excerpt from Viva)

The snow doesn't give a soft white damn
whom it touches.


Charles Simic

Charles Simic

Deer Taking Shelter in Winter

Deer Taking Shelter in Winter

Against Winter

by Charles Simic

The truth is dark under your eyelids.
What are you going to do about it?
The birds are silent; there's no one to ask.
All day long you'll squint at the gray sky.
When the wind blows you'll shiver like straw.

A meek little lamb you grew your wool
Till they came after you with huge shears.
Flies hovered over open mouth,
Then they, too, flew off like the leaves,
The bare branches reached after them in vain.

Winter coming. Like the last heroic soldier
Of a defeated army, you'll stay at your post,
Head bared to the first snow flake.
Till a neighbor comes to yell at you,
You're crazier than the weather, Charlie.


On Winter's Margin

by Mary Oliver

On winter's margin, see the small birds now
With half-forged memories come flocking home
To gardens famous for their charity.
The green globe's broken; vines like tangled veins
Hang at the entrance to the silent wood.

With half a loaf, I am the prince of crumbs;
By snow's down, the birds amassed will sing
Like children for their sire to walk abroad!
But what I love, is the gray stubborn hawk
Who floats alone beyond the frozen vines;
And what I dream of are the patient deer
Who stand on legs like reeds and drink that wind; –

They are what saves the world: who choose to grow
Thin to a starting point beyond this squalor.


Winter Trees

Winter Trees

Winter Poems by William Carlos Williams

Approach Of Winter

by William Carlos Williams

The half-stripped trees
struck by a wind together,
bending all,
the leaves flutter drily
and refuse to let go
or driven like hail
stream bitterly out to one side
and fall
where the salvias, hard carmine –
like no leaf that ever was –
edge the bare garden.


Winter Trees

by William Carlos Williams

All the complicated details
of the attiring and
the dis-attiring are completed!
A liquid moon
moves gently among
the long branches.
Thus having prepared their buds
against a sure winter
the wise trees
stand sleeping in the cold.


Man at Winter Stove

Man at Winter Stove

Those Winter Sundays

by Robert Hayden

Sundays too my father got up early
And put his clothes on in the blueback cold,
then with cracked hands that ached
from labor in the weekday weather made
banked fires blaze. No one ever thanked him.

I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he'd call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,

Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.
What did I know, what did I know
of love's austere and lonely offices?


Excerpt from Collected Poems of Robert Hayden, edited by Frederick Glaysher.

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Snow Storm

Snow Storm

Snow Poems

The Snow-Storm

by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Announced by all the trumpets of the sky,
Arrives the snow, and, driving o'er the fields,
Seems nowhere to alight: the whited air
Hides hills and woods, the river, and the heaven,
And veils the farm-house at the garden's end.
The sled and traveler stopped, the courier's feet
Delayed, all friends shut out, the housemates sit
Around the radiant fireplace, enclosed
In a tumultuous privacy of storm.

Come see the north wind's masonry.
Out of an unseen quarry evermore
Furnished with tile, the fierce artificer
Curves his white bastions with projected roof
Round every windward stake, or tree, or door.
Speeding, the myriad-handed, his wild work
So fanciful, so savage, naught cares he
For number or proportion. Mockingly,
On coop or kennel he hangs Parian wreaths;
A swan-like form invests the hidden thorn;
Fills up the farmer's lane from wall to wall,
Maugre the farmer's sighs; and, at the gate,
A tapering turret overtops the work.
And when his hours are numbered, and the world
Is all his own, retiring, as he were not,
Leaves, when the sun appears, astonished Art
To mimic in slow structures, stone by stone,
Built in an age, the mad wind's night-work,
The frolic architecture of the snow.


A Clear Winter's Day

A Clear Winter's Day

The Snow Man

by Wallace Stevens

One must have a mind of winter
To regard the frost and the boughs
Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;

And have been cold a long time
To behold the junipers shagged with ice,
The spruces rough in the distant glitter

Of the January sun; and not to think
Of any misery in the sound of the wind,
In the sound of a few leaves,

Which is the sound of the land
Full of the same wind
That is blowing in the same bare place

For the listener, who listens in the snow,
And, nothing himself, beholds
Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.


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Robert Frost Reading Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Watch the rare video of Robert Frost (1874 – 1963) reading America's favorite winter poem. The poem text is below the video.

Woods on a Snowy Evening

Woods on a Snowy Evening

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

by Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.


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Winter Sunset

Winter Sunset

Winter Poems for Kids

This special section is for children's poems about winter. Also, be sure to see spring poems for kids.

This poem is a classic favorite and one that delights children all over the world.


Winter-Time

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Late lies the wintry sun a-bed,
A frosty, fiery sleepy-head;
Blinks but an hour or two; and then,
A blood-red orange, sets again.

Before the stars have left the skies,
At morning in the dark I rise;
And shivering in my nakedness,
By the cold candle, bathe and dress.

Close by the jolly fire I sit
To warm my frozen bones a bit;
Or with a reindeer-sled, explore
The colder countries round the door.

When to go out, my nurse doth wrap
Me in my comforter and cap;
The cold wind burns my face, and blows
Its frosty pepper up my nose.

Black are my steps on silver sod;
Thick blows my frosty breath abroad;
And tree and house, and hill and lake,
Are frosted like a wedding cake.


Winter Story Books

Winter Story Books

Here is another winter poem favorite for children by Stevenson.


Picture-Books in Winter

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Summer fading, winter comes
Frosty mornings, tingling thumbs,
Window robins, winter rooks,
And the picture story-books.

Water now is turned to stone
Nurse and I can walk upon;
Still we find the flowing brooks
In the picture story-books.

All the pretty things put by,
Wait upon the children's eye,
Sheep and shepherds, trees and crooks,
In the picture story-books.

We may see how all things are
Seas and cities, near and far,
And the flying fairies' looks,
In the picture story-books.

How am I to sing your praise,
Happy chimney-corner days,
Sitting safe in nursery nooks,
Reading picture story-books?


Winter

Winter

The Sky is Low, The Clouds Are Mean

by Emily Dickinson

The sky is low, the clouds are mean,
A travelling flake of snow
Across a barn or through a rut
Debates if it will go.

A narrow wind complains all day
How some one treated him;
Nature, like us, is sometimes caught
Without her diadem.


Winter Garden

Winter Garden

These children's poems are from the beloved author of the Anne of Green Gables series:


The Garden in Winter

by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Frosty-white and cold it lies
Underneath the fretful skies;
Snowflakes flutter where the red
Banners of the poppies spread,
And the drifts are wide and deep
Where the lilies fell asleep.

But the sunsets o'er it throw
Flame-like splendor, lucent glow,
And the moonshine makes it gleam
Like a wonderland of dream,
And the sharp winds all the day
Pipe and whistle shrilly gay.

Safe beneath the snowdrifts lie
Rainbow buds of by-and-by;
In the long, sweet days of spring
Music of bluebells shall ring,
And its faintly golden cup
Many a primrose will hold up.

Though the winds are keen and chill
Roses' hearts are beating still,
And the garden tranquilly
Dreams of happy hours to be –
In the summer days of blue
All its dreamings will come true.


A Winter Dawn

by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Above the marge of night a star still shines,
And on the frosty hills the somber pines
Harbor an eerie wind that crooneth low
Over the glimmering wastes of virgin snow.

Through the pale arch of orient the morn
Comes in a milk-white splendor newly-born,
A sword of crimson cuts in twain the gray
Banners of shadow hosts, and lo, the day!


Blue Jay in the Snow

Blue Jay in the Snow

Robin in the Snow

Robin in the Snow

More Winter Poems for Children

Winter Song

by Katherine Mansfield

Rain and wind, and wind and rain.
Will the Summer come again?
Rain on houses, on the street,
Wetting all the people's feet,
Though they run with might and main.
Rain and wind, and wind and rain.

Snow and sleet, and sleet and snow.
Will the Winter never go?
What do beggar children do
With no fire to cuddle to,
P'rhaps with nowhere warm to go?
Snow and sleet, and sleet and snow.

Hail and ice, and ice and hail,
Water frozen in the pail.
See the robins, brown and red,
They are waiting to be fed.
Poor dears, battling in the gale!
Hail and ice, and ice and hail.


Winter Jack Frost

Winter Jack Frost