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Sad Feelings Don't Have to Last Long as Told in a Simple Picture Book and Story for Young Readers

Cindy Hewitt is a retired teacher with a passion for children's literature. Read-aloud stories add quality to a child's life experiences.

Feeling Sad and Blue Does Not Have to Last Long

Young readers can learn to listen to their bodies to feel better after being sad

Young readers can learn to listen to their bodies to feel better after being sad

Listen and Wait for Sad Feelings to Pass

Rachel Tomlinson's A Blue Kind of Day is a very relevant picture book and story to share with children in these times that we are living in. Mental health in children is a current topic that all parents and teachers cope with almost on a daily basis.

Coen is having a "down" day. These feelings of sadness are running through his body with all kinds of sensations. He wonders if everybody can see these feelings radiating from him. His skin is so prickly! He can't get out of bed and he feels as though he will never get out of bed again. His family tries to cheer him up, but nothing is working. How about some fresh air? His sister tries to share the teddy bear, but nothing is working. Mom decides to snuggle in with Coen. She watches and waits. His family knew that Coen's sad feelings would not last forever, so they just waited and waited. Snuggling began to work and soon Coen was not so sad anymore.

Tomlinson writes with simple text to tell Coen's story. Tori-Jay Mordey contributed her talents as an illustrator with highly engaging illustrations. The illlustrations are of special interest in that the family is a multicultural family. The illustrations of the family portray a different skin color.

Tomlinson includes an Author's Note with a list of symptoms of depression that parents and teachers should monitor in their children and students. She also includes several suggestions for activities that parents and teachers can do with children to help them explore their feelings.

A Blue Kind of Day is recommended for ages 6-9. It was published by Kokila, a division of Penguin/Random House and has an ISBN of 978-0-593-32401-1.

Engaging Illustrations Tell Coen's Story

Coen is having s "slumpy" day

Coen is having s "slumpy" day

All kinds of sad and prickly feelings in his body

All kinds of sad and prickly feelings in his body

His sister tries to cheer Coen up

His sister tries to cheer Coen up

Mom decides to snuggle and wait

Mom decides to snuggle and wait

Scroll to Continue
Coen begins to feel better

Coen begins to feel better

Reading together with Mom and Dad

Reading together with Mom and Dad

Meet the Author and Illustrator

Rachel Tomlinson is a registered psychologist from Australia who teaches workshops on mental health topics for adults, families, and children. She uses play therapy in working with children. She is an expert on subjects such as parenting skills and child development. She is also the author of Teaching Kids to be Kind.

Tori-Jay-Mordey is an Indigenous Australian illustrator . She uses a variety of medium in her illustrations. She emjoys using digital illustration. She produces work that is based on her family and her racial identity.

Bring A Blue Kind of Day Into the Classroom for Learning About Feelings

Rachel Tomlinson's A Blue Kind of Day is a perfect story and picture book to use with young children when learning about feelings. Mental health for children is a topic that is frequently in the news now because of the times we are living in. The pandemic has affected our children's mental well-being, and it is important now more than ever to monitor children and their feelings.

*Read A Blue Kind of Day in a story time session.

*Call attention to Coen's sad feelings. Engage children in a conversation about things that make them sad.

*Provide drawing paper, crayons, and markers for children to draw how they are feeling.

*Engage children in a conversation of things that they do to make themselves feel better after having sad or angry feelings.

*Provide other picture books and stories for your classroom with characters who have a variety of feelings. Engage children in conversations about the variety of feelings: happiness, sadness, anger, or even jealousy. Have drawing paper, crayons, and markers to illustrate each feeling.

© 2022 Cindy Hewitt

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