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Pooh and the Art of Living & Loving 5- ...That Ends Well

Mohan is a family physician, film and TV aficionado, a keen bibliophile and an eclectic scribbler.

And so we come to the end

Happy bears are all the same; every unhappy bear is unhappy in its own way.

Winnie the Pooh felt unhappy since waking up not knowing who he really was. He sought answers from around him- the mirror, the honey pot, the woods, his signs, his friends, his desires, his games and his acts.

The mystery deepens further by wondering why the sign above his house said it belonged to Mr Sanders and not Mr Pooh. A bear of very little brain, Pooh felt the thoughts stretching the very boundaries of his brain cells as he continued his journey through the woods.

Piglet offered that the clue to Mr Sanders lay within Pooh’s own house and here, ultimately, is where he returned to.

Our story ends where it started, dear reader, as things often do. There is a certain comfort in such circularity.

And thanks for coming along for this wonderful journey, your constant, silent presence has been comforting to Pooh and of course, to me.

The candle took some shadows away, but lengthened the others...

The candle took some shadows away, but lengthened the others...

In which Pooh comes back home.


Pooh opened the door to his house and it was dark inside. He felt a little scurrying noise and was frightened if it was a Heffalump. He hesitated for a moment before stepping in. The sun had gone down and the orange shades of dusk cast long shadows inside that were lengthening by the second.

Pooh fumbled around on the table and lit the candle quickly and the orange light cast away some of the shadows. It also made some shadows worse. Pooh thought about what Piglet had said about the clue Mr Sanders has left in the house.

“I’ve been here very long. I haven’t seen any cloo” muttered Pooh to himself. He wondered if the information Piglet had given may be wrong. He rubbed his chin and scratched his head and thought hard while looking around. “Now where could a cloo be?”

Rrrrrum brrrrrum brrrrum came a noise.

Pooh stopped and stared.

Rrrrrrum brrrrrrum brrrry brrrry brrrrum

The noise was much closer, almost near him.

“Oh bother!” said Pooh, “It’s my tummy that is rumbly. I need to eat something before looking for the cloo”

Pooh felt another song pop into his head. He really wanted to get on and fill his tum first and look for the clue, but sometimes songs can be so powerful they stop you on your tracks and take over your brains, big or little.


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perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit

Sometimes songs can be so powerful they stop you on your tracks and take over your brains, big or little.

perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit

In Which Pooh sings the Rumbly Song...



There’s a great big sound

In the middle of this round

And it’s asking Pooh

For a snack or two

Rumble, Rumble

Rumble, Rumble


It’s the constant hum

Of this hungry tum

We can’t just say

Please go away

Rumble, Rumble

Rumble, Rumble


Whether sticky or runny

There’s nothing like hunny

To fill the space

Bring a smile to the face

Rumble, Rumble

Rumble, Rumble


Yummy Smackarooney!

Yummy Smackarooney!

Hundred Acre Wood

In Which Pooh fills a Space


Pooh may be a bear of very little brain but he knew that empty tums aren’t good when it comes to solving puzzles. He looked at the cupboard and the line of hunny pots there. He reached up and dragged one down and took it to the table. “Yum” he said. His tummy agreed.

The house was silent but for the sound of scooped honey and smacking lips. The rrrrum brrrum went quiet and there was a loud sigh of contentment. Outside there was a sound of a bird and Pooh vaguely wondered if hundred acre woods had some new visitors. He sat there with his paws clasped across his tummy and looked at the empty pot in front of him. The pot had been licked dry and there was not even a memory of honey within.

He felt there could be a teensy, weensy bit more space left in his tummy for some more. He looked at the cupboard. Most of the pots were put upside down to show they were empty and there were a long line of empty pots.

"Oh bother" said Pooh, " I must have run out of honey."

He thought about the secret pots on the tree trunk but he had already eaten them this morning. Pooh felt sad.

However teensy weensy the need may be, it's so easy to feel sad for what is not there without fully feeling happy for what is there.

Pooh stood up to place the empty pot back in the cupboard when something caught his eye. There was a pot on the top shelf that was neither upright nor upside down. It was laying on its side, a bit dusty, as if it has been there for a long, long time without being disturbed.

perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit

However teensy weensy the need may be, it's so easy to feel sad for what is not there without fully feeling happy for what is there.

perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit
Empty forgotten honeypot...

Empty forgotten honeypot...

In Which Pooh finds the Clue...


Pooh pulled a chair away from the table and pushed it close to the cupboard. He climbed up and felt around the top shelf, feeling the pot wobble. A cloud of dust puffed up in a little cloud and descended on his face.

Pooh felt his nose twitch.

A...A...A... Ahhhh Tishooo!

He sneezed hard and nearly lost his footing on the chair. He managed to put his paw into the mouth of the pot and turn it around. He then grabbed the edges of its mouth and brought it down. The pot felt empty and for a moment Pooh thought it as just an empty, forgotten honeypot.

Empty forgotten honeypots sometimes lie on their side and feel sad. Trouble is once you lie on your side and feel sad, you may stay empty and get forgotten for longer. Standing up always helps, empty or full.

As the pot came down, Pooh put his face inside the opening and peered inside. He felt a little rattle as if something was inside. He pushed his paw inside and grabbed hold of something that felt like a rolled up piece of paper.

He climbed down from the chair, pushed it back to the table and took a look at his discovery. Pooh's heart went thumpety thumpety thump as he realized this may be the clue Mr Sanders left.

Pooh unrolled the fragile paper roll and it was a letter. Another puff of dust made his nose twitch again.

A.. A. A.. Ahhh Tishooo!

Pooh grabbed hold of the letter as it threatened to roll away. He ran his paw over the lines and started reading it.

perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit

Empty forgotten honeypots sometimes lie on their side and feel sad. Trouble is once you lie on your side and feel sad, you may stay empty and get forgotten for longer. Standing up always helps, empty or full.

perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit
pooh-and-the-art-of-living-loving-5-that-ends-well
pooh-and-the-art-of-living-loving-5-that-ends-well

In Which Pooh gets the message...

Dear you,

I used to live here. I hope you find the house comfortable. The bed has one wobbly leg and the cupboard gets a bit dusty but it is a good home in a good place. There are plenty of friends who are kind, plenty of adventures to have, plenty of honey to enjoy and games to play.

But I have forgotten who I am and it is making me unhappy. I am going away to find myself.

I hope you are happy here.

Good luck,

Mr Sanders


Pooh spent some time leaning over the letter and reading it once more. He felt surprised and happy that Mr Sanders has had the same pre..predu.. - what was the word Christopher Robin taught him the other day - oh, yes - predicament as he had.

He looked at the aging paper and the ink stains and dust. That letter must have been in the pot for very long time. That meant Mr Sanders hasn't come back from his search. Pooh felt sad. Maybe he was lost, looking for himself.

Pooh was glad he came back home and didn't keep looking for himself out there. He felt the answers will be in here. He read the letter again. He hummed the song that has been running through his little brain again and again...


Who am I?

(Is it where I am)

Who am I?

(Is it what I like?)

Who am I?

(Is it who I know?)

Who am I?

(Is it how I look?)

Who am I?

(Is it what I am called?)”

Who am I?

( Is it where I live?)

Who am I?

(Is it what I do?)

Who am I?

(Is it what I think?)


Who am I?

(Will I ever know?)

Who am I?

(Will I ever know?)


perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit

Now much has been debated about the right answer and a happy answer. While some answers are both right and happy, some may just be right but not happy.

Some, thankfully, may not be right but they are happy.

perspectives-pooh-the-charitable-spirit

In Which Pooh finds Serendipity...


Pooh thought about his day so far. He thought about all that had happened. For a moment he thought maybe he should do what Mr Sanders should do and go away to find his answers. He looked at the fading letter with ink stains. He stood up and went to the mirror where he had first noticed he didn't quite know who he was, that morning.

He stared at his face and watched the day flash past him in the mirror.

He then did something he hasn't done before - he blinked seven times.

Dear reader, if you have been an ardent follower of this tale right from the beginning ( if you weren't, then shame on you - you should go back and remedy the situation this instant!) you'd now know that you blink once for clarity, twice for purity, three times for sanity and four times for curiosity. You blink five times for a calamity and six times for certainty.

Seven times is a very very rare occasion that tends to happen after clarity, purity, sanity, curiosity, calamity and certainty.

Seven times, it has been said, is how much you blink for Serendipity.

A little song, rightly so, popped into Pooh's head. And often where there is a song, there is a happy answer.

Now much has been debated about the right answer and a happy answer. while some answers are both right and happy, some may just be right but not happy.

Some, thankfully, may not be right but they are happy.

Pooh chose the happy answer and his little brain didn't worry about whether it was right or wrong.


Who am I?

(I am none of those)

Who am I?

(I am all of those)

Pooh decided that he needed to remember this message and decided to write this down on a piece of paper himself. He knew, as the night darkened further outside, tomorrow will be a bright sunny day in Hundred acre woods and all his friends will be waiting for him.

He knew that he will wake up knowing that he is Winnie- ther- Pooh, a bear of very little brain and a very big heart.

A heart so big, that the whole of hundred acre wood could fit in it and still have room for surprises.

He rolled out a piece of paper, dipped his quill pen in the ink and started writing in straggly letters...

"It was raining in hundred acre wood that morning..."



The End

Pooh will return for a Christmas Special...


(All the illustrations were drawn and painted on the iPad 'Paper' app using my finger! The pen and wash effects were too good to resist!)


(Pooh created by A A Milne and originally illustrated by EH Shepard)

This story by Mohan Kumar

You blink once for clarity, twice for purity, three times for sanity and four times for curiosity. Five times for a calamity and six times for certainty.

Seven times, it has been said, is how much you blink for Serendipity.

Piglet: "Do you think Docmo will write a story about us too?" Eeyore " I don't think so. I don't think we'll ever get a story about us from him...unless people ask him for it."

Piglet: "Do you think Docmo will write a story about us too?" Eeyore " I don't think so. I don't think we'll ever get a story about us from him...unless people ask him for it."

A song for Mr Sanders

© 2012 Mohan Kumar

Comments

Mary Hyatt from Florida on September 28, 2012:

I really have to go back and play catch up with your other Winnie the Pooh stories. One of my children collected Winnie stuffed animals when she was very young, and still has them.

Your art work is amazing!

I voted this UP, and will share.

Life Under Construction from Neverland on September 28, 2012:

ohh what a lovely surprise ending! Bravo for this hub Docmo!

Gary R. Smith from the Head to the Heart on September 27, 2012:

Wonderful, marvelous story. Beautifully written and illustrated. You weave gorgeous realizations into a playful scene such as: "However teensy weensy the need may be, it's so easy to feel sad for what is not there without fully feeling happy for what is there. " As Dory the fish (in the Finding Nemo movie) would say, 'Just keep swimming.'

Mary Craig from New York on September 11, 2012:

You are amazing! Here you have, how many adults, reading about Winnie the Pooh and totally loving every minute of it! Your Pooh series has been filled with pearls of wisdom such as, "it's so easy to feel sad for what is not there without fully feeling happy for what is there." It has also been a total joy to read and look at. You surpass yourself at every turn.

Voted up all the way across because it is just such a novel idea that has been done so well. Also pinned and shared.

Genna East from Massachusetts, USA on September 10, 2012:

When I saw this hub on my e-mail list, I huge smile spread across my face. “Ohhh, good!” I thought with such anticipation. We are somehow children again, with our eyes and hearts opened wide in wonder as we learn about ourselves and the world around us. I’m sorry to see this series close, but all good things must come to an end, and this ending was perfect. The message in the words and the drawings are so wonderful! You should really publish this, Doc.

Dianna Mendez on September 09, 2012:

I love your series, Docmo! Who doesn't love this rumbly bear? Your artwork is amazing. You certainly have a deeper side of you that is coming out and creating such a passion for story telling and enjoyment in others. Voted up, shared and pinned too!

Gypsy Rose Lee from Daytona Beach, Florida on September 09, 2012:

Voted up and awesome. Wonderful end to this story and so glad Pooh realized who he was and found that note from Mr. Sanders. Passing this on.

Ruby Jean Richert from Southern Illinois on September 08, 2012:

I loved the ending and Pooh bear's journey. He is so lovable and has a heart of pure honey gold. Thank you Mohan..

Maria Jordan from Jeffersonville PA on September 08, 2012:

I blinked seven times and realized there is so much right about a sweet little bear with little brains but a very big heart.

What a satisfying ending (or is it?), Mohan. Loved this charmingly philosophical tale from start to finish.

Voted UP and ABI. Hugs, Maria

Suzette Walker from Taos, NM on September 08, 2012:

What a charming story! I love your ending. We don't always know who we are or ultimately will be. I always say "I'm still a work in progress," when anyone wants to know where I'm going or what I'm doing. It is just one long journey that I don't want to end. Thanks you so much for reminding us of what is really important in life. This is just so endearing. Thank you! And, like Amy said - Thanks for making us feel like kids again.

Amy Becherer from St. Louis, MO on September 08, 2012:

When I was a kid, I always imagined the best part about being a grown-up would be in knowing who I was, what I wanted and having all the answers. Your Pooh series reminds me that no one gets there. And, who would want to. The fun is in the mystery, knowing that tomorrow is unknown and there for the taking; different for each one of us.

For the longest time, I had a pre-conceived notion that doctor's were like God. I went to the doctor expecting to find all my mysteries solved and I was safe. I was a very intense patient for the OB/GYN who delivered my one and only. I would ask him a question, he would answer and at one point, when I was close to my delivery date, he looked at me and laughing, said "You look like you want me to tell you something profound." I did, but how could I ask him if everything was going to be fine? I just laughed and said "just tell me doctor, am I pregnant?" In that moment, I learned that there are important questions that no one, not even the trusted doctor can know. Life is sometimes scary. It can feel out of control. It is equally exciting. Your beautiful story illustrates that it is the journey, not the destination that matters.

I wasn't familiar, other than an inkling, about Pooh, until now. And, I'd certainly love to know more about that adorable Eyore and sweet Piglet. Strangely, I feel so much younger than before...Thank you, Mohan.

Peg Cole from North Dallas, Texas on September 08, 2012:

This enchanting story is about more than a tale of a bear and his honey. It's filled with positive philosophy and introspection woven in-between lines. I like this series and the illustrations are amazing.

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

mperrottet - appreciate your vote of confidence and thank you so much!

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

Melchi thank you so much. I really appreciate your wonderful comments. I have always enjoyed making up stories and did so for my own younger brothers... It is lifelong habit I suppose. I am just glad others enjoy it too ...

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

MamaKim.. aw thank you very much. I dabble in art and I found EH Shepards original illustrations a great source to do these sketches. The ipad was convenient for a quick transfer to the hubs. appreciate your comments and support.

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

Phoebe, thank you very much for dropping by .. hope you get a chance to read the other chapters too.

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

Than you, Sir Bill, your support is always appreciated.

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

Janine- I'm glad you enjoyed this series. It wouldn't have grown into this tale without the warm support of the readers .. so thank you very much!

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

Richard- much appreciated, sir. thank you for reading this and your comments.

Mohan Kumar (author) from UK on September 08, 2012:

Daisy- thanks for reading this finale and your wonderful comments/ I need to check copyright restrictions on Pooh before embarking on an e-book but sounds like a great idea. thank you!

Margaret Perrottet from San Antonio, FL on September 08, 2012:

Absolutely wonderful! I agree that you should publish this as a book.

Melanie Chisnall from Cape Town, South Africa on September 07, 2012:

I don't know how you come up with these stories....they are fantastic! Your children are very lucky to hear you reading something so wonderful and captivating that you have written! Not many parents have that pleasure.

I loved reading this and will catch up on the rest of Pooh's stories - he's one of my favourties!

Thanks for taking us on an enchanting journey into the life of Winnie the Pooh - at least for a little while :)

Aloe Kim on September 07, 2012:

I can't believe you drew those with your finger on an ipad! Amazing ^_^ This story has been excellent, I'm sad it's over. Voted a bunch and shared

Phoebe Pike on September 07, 2012:

Beautiful. Absolutely beautiful. When I was a child, Pooh bear was one of my favorite stories. This hub brought back a lot of fine memories.

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on September 07, 2012:

You have done great justice to Milne my friend, and Pooh would be proud. Excellent work!

Janine Huldie from New York, New York on September 07, 2012:

Oh I loved this series and he ending truly did not disappoint. I agrees ith Daisy that you should publish an E-book of the full story. Truly enjoyed it Docmo and have of course voted and shared too!!

Rich from Kentucky on September 07, 2012:

Mohan -

I'm reminded of the last scene from the Wizard of Oz. Dorothy talks of having searched for her heart's desires elsewhere, but determines, "There's no place like home!" A wise tale remarkably told, my friend. Thoroughly enjoyed!

Daisy Mariposa from Orange County (Southern California) on September 07, 2012:

Mohan (Docmo),

The wait for the ending to your Winnie-ther-Pooh pastiche was well worth it!!!

Wow!

You simply must publish this an e-Book! You simply must!

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