Skip to main content

Original Song: "When Morning Looms" with Commentary

Music is my first love. I write songs and record them from time to time. I especially love my songs that exude spiritual ardor.

"The frost is on the fence post"

"The frost is on the fence post"

Introduction and Text of "When Morning Looms"

The singing of birds in the morning often heralds a day of remembering. Glorious angels surround the meditation seat of one who remembers. Often the thought of water always seeking, seeking its own level will remind the brain of honesty, forthrightness, and delivery from evil.

Most songs remain dull outposts of themselves as they pander, exaggerate, and often obliterate inspiration in favor of calumny. Yet poems that are transformed into songs may hold a certain magic, if only for the singer/poet.

This song/poem rages against the "Quacker" who would not only cheapen but attempts to obliterate the sun that shines on the flock of lies that quackers often tell themselves in order to stand taller.

Satan is ready to command and some will always follow, while others will not.

When Morning Looms

"And all the time she didn't pay the least attention to Quacker . . . " —Old Granny Fox, Thornton W. Burgess

Chorus:

There’s nothing clouds can shake
To break the jealous ties
The frost in on the fence post
The water is still wise

Verse 1:

When morning looms
And the pepper is hot
The turtle will be bright
But the sturgeon will not
After butterflies spill free
And the yellow turns to gold
The quirky will stay young
The evil will grow old

Verse 2:

Nothing to see here, Quacker
Nothing to hear at all
The moss grows on the wrong side
While the bitter reaps the fall
You've raked the scent of verses
And burned them in your nose
And dumped your figs on stories
That vindicate the rose

Verse 3:

The wisdom of the ages
Prevails without a brain
But nuts and loons and titmice
Disturb the worn terrain
Nobody gives a damn about
A song sung by a saint
And plucky hens and misanthropes
Still spin their days drug-dazed

Verse 4:

O hurry sun and come to all
Who wither in the rain
And spray your rays to badger them
Who lack a civil brain
When morning looms
And the pepper turns to dawn
The turtle will sing on
But the sturgeon will be gone

Commentary

To listen to the song, please visit "When Morning Looms" at SoundCloud.

Chorus: The Squelch of Ideas

There’s nothing clouds can shake
To break the jealous ties
The frost in on the fence post
The water is still wise

The chorus of my song, "When Morning Looms," dramatizes the postmodern squelch of ideas that permeate both weather and the common truth that water, which does nothing other than seek its own level, is "wise."

Frost on the fence post is, in fact, just another form of water. And how long does frost on the fence post last? Until the sun comes up! Unfortunately, the frost may appear again and again until springtime.

Verse 1: A New Beginning

When morning looms
And the pepper is hot
The turtle will be bright
But the sturgeon will not
After butterflies spill free
And the yellow turns to gold
The quirky will stay young
The evil will grow old

Every morning offers a new beginning for the children of planet Earth. The sun rises on the innocent and the guilty alike. The singer of this plaintiff song metaphorically compares her essence to that of a "turtle." Also metaphorically, an adversarial "sturgeon" occupies its own level of being.

The turtle rests nearer the heavens on the ladder of evolution than the sturgeon. The turtle treads the land, while the sturgeon still breathes through gills—swimming is its only way of locomotion.

A turtle might swim as it chooses, but it also walks on the ground. Naturally, the "turtle will be bright," and the "sturgeon will not."

The sturgeon will remain water-bound. No matter how bright the sturgeon might think itself, the fact is that it will remain the victim of gills. Not content to concentrate on stations of life as victim/adversary in her worldview to turtle/sturgeon, the singer metaphorically sings in "butterflies."

Butterflies after resting gestationally in the cocoon stage eventually "spill free." "Yellow" which in some venues equals cowardice turns to "gold," as the singer notes she has witnessed that "quirky" folks seem to remain youthful, while "the evil" or those who slander and smear others lose their youthful spirit.

Verse 2: The Emptiness of Blather, Bilge, and Poppycock

Nothing to see here, Quacker
Nothing to hear at all
The moss grows on the wrong side
While the bitter reaps the fall
You've raked the scent of verses
And burned them in your nose
And dumped your figs on stories
That vindicate the rose

The speaker then accepts the fact that what she has to sing will have no influence on those who will never understand her "quirky" nature. She calls her adversary "Quacker" because for her, all the blathering, bilge, and poppycock she has heard from that quarter is nothing but quacking.

The singer/speaker knows and accepts the fact that nothing she can ever say or do will change the position of the sturgeonesque quacking quacker who would always continue to slander and smear, if she would but allow it. According to the thinking of the singer, the adversary’s bitterness will lead to a reaping of the fall.

The adversary's moss "grows on the wrong side." The adversary has deliberately and maliciously slandered and smeared the better angels of the world. The singer/poet muses, creates, sings, and rises above the skank-smoke of earthbound quackery.

Verse 3: Letting the Eternal Pass By

The wisdom of the ages
Prevails without a brain
But nuts and loons and titmice
Disturb the worn terrain
Nobody gives a damn about
A song sung by a saint
And plucky hens and misanthropes
Still spend their days drug-dazed

The adversary gives no time to understanding of the ethereal or the eternal. The singer knows that "the wisdom of the ages" continues despite the pop off platitudes of satan worshipers.

But she also sees that gutter snipes can disturb the landscape and mental environment, even of wider, natural culture. It still remains common knowledge that saints hold little sway over the hide-bound.

Even in the halls of learning and high culture, saints remain passé. And all common, societal drugs spread their mischief over a large percentage of the population. Adversary and adversity unite in the spawn of the death cult.

Verse 4: The Civil Brain of Self-Sufficiency

O hurry sun and come to all
Who wither in the rain
And spray your rays to badger them
Who lack a civil brain
When morning looms
And the pepper turns to dawn
The turtle will sing on
But the sturgeon will be gone

The singer then calls on the sun to come to those who have been withering in the rain. She asks for the giant orb to spray its rays—not necessarily to heal them but to "badger them"—the singer knows that the adversary suffers the indignity of buying into the postmodern, vaccinated pharmaceutical blather.

The sun is bad for you—voila! skin cancer! Just a "civil brain" would be sufficient to understand that far from causing disease, the sun is a healing force for all earthly inhabitant—avoid extreme sunburns but take the vitamin D.

The singer then reprises the first line—mentioning pepper, which was merely "hot" in the opening, but now is turning "to dawn." Pepper is an enlivening spice; pepper brings food to life, gives it an enchanting flavor. You cannot spell pepper without pep.

For this singer, pepper is important, heralding the original notion of the conflict between "turtle" and "sturgeon." The turtle/singer moves forward on intuition—swimming in the blessèd, bright realization of soul power that overcomes all darkness in the wise water.

© 2015 Linda Sue Grimes

Comments

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on January 28, 2020:

Thank you for your comment, Umesh Chandra Bhatt. It is always a pleasant surprise to hear kind words about my musical compositions. Although music was my first love, I opted to engage more deeply in a quieter art form in the writing of poetry. I still love music, and I especially love creating my own songs. Blessings!

Umesh Chandra Bhatt from Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India on January 28, 2020:

Nice song. Good composition. I heard it at SoundCloud. It was melodious.

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on December 25, 2015:

Thank you so much, Surabhi! Glad you liked my song. I'm always especially thrilled to find out I have a fan who likes my music. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Surabhi Kaura on December 24, 2015:

Ah - I love it. All of the four verses are brilliant! Such a pleasure to know you. You have got a fan now. God bless :)

Related Articles