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My Favorite Fictional History Novel By Philippa Gregory

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Liza is a homemaker who loves reading fictional history novels.

My First Historical Fiction

Today, Philippa Gregory is one of my favorite historical authors. I began reading one of her novels when I was a college student. One day, my college roommate decided to borrow me one of her novels (The Other Boleyn Girl) whilst I was looking bored in the room. So, I began reading, and immediately, it made me a fan of her writing style. Whilst I was reading the novel, I was intrigued by the chronology, the personalities, and the thriller she utilized in her writing. Ever since reading my first novel of hers, made me an avid reader of historical reading fiction. If you are a fancier of royal history and its stories, you will enjoy reading this type of novel.

Philippa Gregory Brief Biography

Philippa Gregory was born on 9 January 1954 in Nairobi, at that time serving as the capital city of the Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (modern-day Republic of Kenya). She is an English historical novelist who has been publishing since 1987. Her flair for blending history and imagination developed into a signature style and Philippa went on to write many bestselling novels, including The Other Boleyn Girl and The White Queen.

In her writing career, many Philippa Gregory novels have become #1 in New York Times Bestselling. By the way, did you know a few of her books have been adapted into popular mini-series and films? For example, The White Queen (mini-series) and The Other Boleyn Girl (film).

Note: If you owned her novel, you would notice how beautiful the front cover or the illustration is. It has become my ritual to look at it before buying her new novel.

My Top 5 Historical Fiction Novel By Philippa Gregory

1) The White Queen (2009)

2) The Red Queen (2010)

3) The King's Curse (2014)

4) Three Sisters Three Queens (2016)

5) The Last Tudor (2017)

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1) The White Queen (2009)

The White Queen is the first novel of The Cousins' War Trilogy. It was about a lady named Elizabeth Grey (Elizabeth Woodville). She was famously known as Queen of England in 1464 when she married King Edward IV. However, the marriage led to conflict with his chief advisor, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, and his eventual temporary removal from the throne.

Following her husband's passing, her eldest son, Edward, who was set to become king, and his younger brother Richard, were locked in the Tower of London in 1483 by their deceitful uncle — Duke of Gloucester. He would instead claim the crown as Richard III for himself. Her two young princes were declared illegitimate heirs by Richard and were believed to be murdered in the Tower of London.

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2) The Red Queen (2010)

After The White Queen came the second novel, The Red Queen, if you are acquainted with English royal family history, you must have been confronted with an influential figure— Margaret Beaufort. She also was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. As an heiress to the red rose of Lancaster, Margaret Beaufort firmly believes that her house is the true ruler of England.

She was King Henry VII's mother, the first Tudor monarch in history. She was determined to make sure her only son Henry Tudor became the successor of the throne and thus triumphed as King of England. She has her own way through loveless marriages, ambitions, treacherous alliances, and secret plots to make sure her plan is successful.

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3) The King's Curse (2014)

The King's Curse was about a woman named Margaret (an heir to Plantagenet) who has quite a thrilling life whilst being a chief lady-in-waiting to Katherine of Aragorn (wife to King Henry VIII). Before being a close confidante to the Queen, she was a wife to Sir Richard Pole— a Tudor knight.

Following her husband's passing, she found herself in hardships managing her life with five young children. In the meantime, her life is contested by King's mother (Margaret Beaufort) requesting her loyalty. Hence, her life will be more leisurely. She was desperate to choose between her loyalty to the country or the sake of her children. Amid the rapid decline of the Tudor court, she must choose whether her devotion is to the tyranny of King Henry VIII or to her beloved Queen.

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4) Three Sisters, Three Queens (2016)

Three Sisters, Three Queens novel is part of the Plantagenet and Tudor story. It was about three influential women— Catherine of Aragorn, Margaret Tudor, and her youngest sister Mary Tudor. From Spain, Catherine of Aragorn came to England to marry Arthur Tudor (Prince of Wales). Six months after Catherine married Arthur, he died of sweating sickness. Then, she married Henry Tudor — became King Henry VIII in 1509 which made Catherine a Queen. Margaret Tudor was Arthur's younger sister, and she was fairly happy married to King James IV of Scotland. Last, her youngest sister Mary Tudor was married to King Louis XII of France.

So, the connection between these three powerful women is they were Queen. Furthermore, their family was tied by blood, marriage, and loyalty to their spouses. Alas, the three Queens see themselves against each other. There were orders, plots, ambitions, and betrayals between them.

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5) The Last Tudor (2017)

The Last Tudor is about Jane Grey— who became Queen of England and Ireland when she was only sixteen. She was the great-granddaughter of Henry VII and abruptly inherited the crown from her cousin King Edward VI on 9 July 1553. Before he died in June 1553, he wrote in his will and nominated Jane and her male heirs as successors to the throne. As a protestant himself, Edward did it because his half-sister Mary Tudor (King Henry VIII's daughter with his first wife Catherine of Aragorn) was a Catholic. He did not want Mary to be the Queen because he feared she would restore Catholicism and undo his and their father has reformed. In the meantime, Jane was a Protestant and would support the reformed Church of England.

Sadly, Lady Jane Grey sat on the throne only for nine days after Mary Tudor and her supporters assembled the military and overpowered Jane Grey from her crown.

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© 2022 Liza

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