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Books Come to Life for Children

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Sand, Boats & Treasure

Books are great spring boards for bringing ideas to life that are not only educational but fun. Creating a two or three dimensional project with a child is easier than you might think. It simply depends on the materials you choose to use.

While reading "Ten Gingerbread Men" by Ruth Galloway my four year old grandson pointed out the palm trees, a treasure chest, sand and a boat. Realizing we had those items in the house we gathered them together and put some water in a large pan to recreate the picture we saw in the book. We also added ice cubes to the water and pretended they were icebergs.

It was a fun project to do together and gave us an opportunity to talk about sandy islands, fast boats, and treasure chests full of gold. The bonus was seeing him enjoy playing with the scene we'd just created.

Recreating a scene from the "Ten Gingerbread Men" by Ruth Galloway

Recreating a scene from the "Ten Gingerbread Men" by Ruth Galloway

Earthquakes by Sharon Delgleish

Earthquakes by Sharon Delgleish

A Simple Cut & Paste Project

Earthquakes, volcano's and tsunami's fill the pages of the book "Earthquakes" by Sharon Dalgleish. This book inspired us to create the volcano art work shown here.

I sketched the basic shape of the red volcano and yellow lava onto construction paper. Then my grandson cut them out and glued the pieces together. He then colored in some of the areas.

Construction Paper Volcano

Construction Paper Volcano

Tsunamis Wave

Tsunamis Wave

Materials Needed

  • large sheet of paper
  • pencil
  • non-toxic washable paint
  • non-toxic washable markers
  • sponge paint brushes

Making a Big Wave

The tsunamis wave idea came from Sharon Dalgleish's book called, "Earthquakes" too. While making this project my grandson and I talked about earthquakes and how huge waves are formed in the ocean.

To make this project we used a large sheet of brown paper, paint and markers. We even mixed a small amount of sand into some of the paint to add some texture. Sponge brushes worked well as they spread the paint easily over large areas.

I recommend wearing a long sleeved shirt or t-shirt to cover your clothing for a messy project like this.

Painting the ocean waves.

Painting the ocean waves.

Drawing windows on the buildings.

Drawing windows on the buildings.

Adding finishing touches to sandy areas.

Adding finishing touches to sandy areas.

A tsunamis made with paint, markers and sand.

A tsunamis made with paint, markers and sand.

The Ice is Melting

The sugar cubes melted or fell down when we tried using a liquid glue so we decided to try using white frosting. It gave the castle a brick mortar look with the frosting oozing between the sugar cubes. This was a fun choice as we could sample it while we worked.

Cutting out the top of the ice castle.

Cutting out the top of the ice castle.

Making an Ice Castle

This cool idea came from a book by Irene Luxbacher called "123 I Can Build."

To make it we used...

  • sugar cubes
  • white frosting
  • blue construction paper
  • silver duck tape
  • card board box
  • play dough
  • tooth picks
  • cotton balls
  • white glue
making-books-come-alive-for-children
Super excited about finishing this castle.

Super excited about finishing this castle.

making-books-come-alive-for-children

© 2013 Laura Ross

Comments

Laura Ross (author) on March 15, 2013:

Thank you for your positive comments and stopping by to read this hub.

Life Under Construction from Neverland on March 15, 2013:

This is really good, very useful and has great tips. Children also develops creativity and enhance their learning skills. wonderful.

Laura Ross (author) on March 06, 2013:

Thank you so much randomcreative! I love to read to my grandson and our local library is our second home. We're always looking for new ways to look at the world we live in and books inspire creative thinking and of course fun projects.

Rose Clearfield from Milwaukee, Wisconsin on March 06, 2013:

Great topic for an article! You can apply this concept to virtually any children's book. What wonderful inspiration for both parents and teachers.