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Loneliness Matters: Facts, Ideas, a Story, and a Poem

Linda Crampton is a teacher who enjoys reading and creative writing. Her favourite genres are classic literature, fantasy, myth, and poetry.

Some lonely people have an intense desire for connection. Even without physical contact, a smile or a greeting can help a lonely person.

Some lonely people have an intense desire for connection. Even without physical contact, a smile or a greeting can help a lonely person.

The Problem of Loneliness

News reports today talk of an epidemic of loneliness or a loneliness crisis. Even allowing for some exaggeration, it certainly seems that the number of lonely people is increasing. There are multiple ideas about why the problem appears to be getting worse. Whatever the reason, some people need help.

The inspiration from this article came from a writing challenge. As part of the challenge, participants had to pick a sentence from a book. They were then required to create a story or poem based on the sentence according to prescribed rules.

I chose my sentence from a memorable short story called "The Return". The story was written by Brenda Chamberlain, a twentieth-century writer and artist from Wales. Both her tale and her life inspired me to think about loneliness and the problems that it causes. They also inspired me to use the topic as the theme of my poem and this article.

Just because someone is alone doesn't mean that they are lonely. Another point to consider is that sometimes a person surrounded by other people feels lonely.

Just because someone is alone doesn't mean that they are lonely. Another point to consider is that sometimes a person surrounded by other people feels lonely.

Loneliness and Being Alone

Loneliness and being alone are not always the same thing. Severe loneliness can lead to depression. Researchers have discovered that loneliness is bad for physical as well as mental health. Investigations suggest that chronic loneliness disrupts sleep and increases the risk of some diseases, including cardiovascular problems.

Being alone doesn't necessarily mean that a person is lonely. Some people are content in solitude. Some creative people deliberately seek solitude in order to concentrate on their work. Others simply enjoy being in the company of their own thoughts and are happy with their solo discoveries and endeavors. For some people, though, the desire for connection with other human beings is strong and unfulfilled. This desire may emerge only at certain times in life or may be persistent.

It's often believed that elderly people have the greatest risk of becoming lonely as their friends and relatives die and their mobility decreases (it in fact it does). While older people can become lonely, researchers have discovered that loneliness can be a problem for people of any age, including children and teenagers.

In the video below, a NHS (National Health Service) representative discusses social isolation.

Why Is Social Isolation Increasing?

The cause of increasing loneliness appears to be multifactorial. The theories that I've seen have linked the phenomenon to our modern lifestyle. They are just theories, however. There doesn't seem to be a clear understanding of the situation yet.

One contribution to the problem may be the increasing digitalization of many societies. For example, automated supermarket check-outs and ticket purchases and self-service devices and institutions are gradually removing opportunities for people to make even brief connections with others. Though digitalization and mechanization may sound like minor problems in relation to loneliness, for some people they can be major ones. A conversation with someone such as a cashier or a food server can be important for reducing social isolation.

Using social media accounts may sound like a great way to maintain connections with others and relieve loneliness. Some research suggests that this may not always be the case, however. Online communication with someone that we know in person may be helpful for creating a feeling of being connected. Communication with strangers or people that we know only from their social media account may not be so helpful. The connections may be superficial and ultimately unsatisfying.

Possible Ways to Overcome Loneliness

Many people are lonely at times. A person who is frequently or chronically lonely may need help, however. An organization, a counsellor, a relative, or a trusted friend may provide this help. In addition—or instead—lonely people may find ways to help themselves.

Loneliness can be caused by a variety of factors, including knowing or having access to only a few people, having superficial or unsatisfactory connections with people, or feeling uncomfortable during social interaction. Solutions for loneliness therefore vary. The ideas below are often recommended as potential solutions.

Join a Group

Joining a group that explores a topic of interest or helping people or animals in need by doing volunteer work may reduce the feeling of loneliness. Shifting our attention to something outside ourselves and perhaps bigger than ourselves can be helpful for others and for us.

Get a Pet

Getting a pet is often recommended as a tactic to relieve loneliness. While a pet can be wonderful company, a person should think about the pet's wellbeing as well as their own before they bring it into their home. Pets require suitable care to keep them healthy and happy.

Greet Others

Walking into an area containing people and exchanging a greeting, a comment, or even a smile with someone else may be helpful for people who find social interaction difficult. Determination and repeated practice may be needed, especially if some of the attempts to interact are unsuccessful, but the end result could be very worthwhile. Reaching out to friends and relatives could be helpful for those who have connections.

Change an Attitude

Taking steps to reduce social isolation can be important for solving a loneliness problem, but it may not be a complete solution for some people. Improving a negative attitude about being alone could also be important. As one of the references below says, "rewriting the story" and learning to enjoy our own company could be helpful in some situations.

Explore Solutions

Doing research to discover how other people have dealt with loneliness may be useful. Specific people and written material can be inspirational. I find the quote below inspiring, since nature is an important part of my life.

Here I sit between my brother the mountain and my sister the sea. We three are one in loneliness, and the love that binds us together is deep and strong and strange.

— Kahlil Gibran

A view on Bardsey Island; the island has links to Brenda Chamberlain

A view on Bardsey Island; the island has links to Brenda Chamberlain

A Brief Biography of Brenda Chamberlain

Brenda Chamberlain was a Welsh artist and writer who lived from 1912 until 1971. She was born in the city of Bangor in Wales and trained as an artist at the Royal Academy Schools in London.

While in London, Chamberlain met John Petts, an artist and a craftsman. The pair married in 1935 and returned to Wales in 1936. Here they established the Caseg Press, which published greeting cards, postcards, and bookplates.

During the second world war, Petts became an ambulance attendant in Europe and the Middle East. Chamberlain remained in Wales and temporarily became a poet instead of an artist. She published the Caseg Broadsheets with Alun Lewis. These contained poems by Chamberlain, Lewis, Dylan Thomas, and Lynette Roberts.

Chamberlain and Petts divorced in 1946. After her divorce, Chamberlain continued her writing and also returned to art, for which she won awards. Unfortunately, in her later years she suffered from major bouts of loneliness and depression.

If you look at the long and thin projection extending from Gwynedd (region 12) in the map above, you may see a small island at its tip. This is Bardsey Island, where Brenda Chamberlain once lived. The island may have partly prompted her writing of the story entitled "The Return".

"The Return": A Story by Brenda Chamberlain

As a writer, Brenda Chamberlain is known primarily as a poet, although she also wrote novels. She wrote at least one short story as well, which I have in my copy of The Penguin Book of Welsh Short Stories.

"The Return" is a moving tale of a woman named Bridget who is in love with a dying man. He lives on an island separated from a mainland village by a dangerous sea channel. The man is married to someone else, but the couple are separated. Nevertheless, Bridget faces disapproval from the villagers for her relationship with the man. Though her home on the island is located not far from the village, she is an outsider.

After a short time away, Bridget travels alone from the village to the island in a heavy fog. At the start of the trip she learns that the wife of the man she loves is planning to visit the island in the near future.

During the difficult boat voyage Bridget becomes surrounded by fog and is forced to lay anchor overnight. As she sits in the boat, she thinks about her life and her love. The quoted sentence shown above my poem describes Bridget's experience as she awakens from a dream during her night alone at sea.

Bardsey Island in Wales

Brenda Chamberlain lived on Bardsey Island for fifteen years. The island is located off the coast of northwest Wales in the county of Gwynedd and is known as Ynys Enlli in Welsh. The Welsh name means "Island in the Currents". Dangerous rip tides surround Ynys Enlli. To me, the island sounds very much like the one described in "The Return".

Bardsey Island in only one and a half miles long and a maximum of only one mile wide. Historically, it was an important religious centre. In the Middle Ages, Christian pilgrims travelled to the island. Today the island is a nature reserve. It's known for its interesting wildlife, including dolphins, porpoises, grey seals, and birds. Remains of gravestones from the tenth or eleventh century can be seen on the island as well as the remains of a thirteenth-century abbey.

A picture can act as a writing prompt. Why or what is the angel writing in the book?

A picture can act as a writing prompt. Why or what is the angel writing in the book?

A writing prompt is anything that stimulates new ideas for writing topics. It may consist of words, a picture, an object, a scene, or an experience. Attempting to create a piece of writing from a prompt is a type of writing challenge. A writing challenge can stimulate the creation of new work, as it did for me.

A Writing Challenge and a Poem

Participants in the writing challenge that triggered the creation of the poem shown below were asked to choose a sentence from a book. We were then asked to write a poem, starting each line with a word in the chosen sentence and using the words sequentially. As an alternative, we were allowed to base our composition on the sentence in any way that we wanted.

I've used all the words in my chosen sentence in my poem, but the words aren't used sequentially and they appear anywhere in a line instead of always at the start. The poem describes a woman's escape from loneliness and depression and her fear that the companionship and happiness that she is currently experiencing are only temporary.

Out of dream, she swam into consciousness, painfully leaving the dark figures of fantasy.

— Brenda Chamberlain in "The Return"

Loneliness Lies Sleeping

Loneliness lay sleeping

and depression curled within;

dark figures of the night

asleep in strange repose


She crawled away from darkness

for fear of waking pain,

and heard the distant call

of friendliness and care


She swam towards the light

through consciousness and hope

and touched the ancient dream

in wonder and delight


She stood amidst the love

and tendrils of concern,

and welcomed happiness,

a fantasy no more


Amidst the tears of joy

at leaving grief behind

an icy shiver ran;

remembrance of the past


The road led into life

and out of cold despair

She took the path revealed

to find community


Yet still they slept within

quiescent but alive

sending chilling dreams

of being painfully reclaimed

References

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and does not substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, and/or dietary advice from a licensed health professional. Drugs, supplements, and natural remedies may have dangerous side effects. If pregnant or nursing, consult with a qualified provider on an individual basis. Seek immediate help if you are experiencing a medical emergency.

© 2015 Linda Crampton

Comments

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on October 26, 2020:

Hi, Denise. Yes, being alone is not necessarily the same thing as being lonely. I'm glad that you are no longer lonely and that life is better for you.

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on October 26, 2020:

I remember my first marriage was so bad that I felt lonely in a room full of people. He was cruel and brutal until I packed my babies, my bags, and left him. I still have scars from that marriage but I know being alone is never so bad as being lonely in a marriage.

Blessings,

Denise

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on October 12, 2020:

Your story about the woman in the care facility is so sad. Loneliness can cause many problems. Thank you for the comment about the poem.

Blessings to you, Denise.

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on October 12, 2020:

Loneliness is a real thing these days with the isolation of Covid 19. I read recently about a 95-year-old woman in a care facility dying because she didn't want to live anymore in the isolation this virus has caused her. Your poem captures it so well. It is a sleeping beast threatening to awaken.

Blessings,

Denise

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on September 17, 2020:

I'm sorry that you had such a horrible time in your first marriage and that you experienced so much loneliness, Denise. I'm glad you found happiness with your current husband.

Blessings to you.

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on September 17, 2020:

There isn't any worse loneliness that being married to a man who doesn't love you. My first husband beat me for 4 years until I ran away. I was so incredibly lonely.

Blessings,

Denise

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on September 12, 2020:

I appreciate your visit and comment, Peggy. I agree with what you said in your last paragraph. I wanted to comment on your latest article. By the time I got to it, the article had already been switched to a network site, so I couldn't leave a comment.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on September 12, 2020:

It was interesting learning about Brenda Chamberlain and her work. Your poem spoke to a woman seeking to escape her cage of loneliness, but fearful that her solution would be fleeting.

Loneliness is a growing problem in our world today. As seemingly connected as we are via our phones and the Internet, real face-to-face interactions seem to suffer.

It is becoming a challenge to find one of your articles where comments can still be left. I hope that they resolve that problem soon.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on August 24, 2017:

Thank you very much, Emilea. It's nice to meet you!

Emilea Andrews from UK on August 24, 2017:

great poem! i like how you weave words and still maintain the emotion of your writing

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on July 23, 2017:

Thank you so much, Chitrangada Sharan. Using a writing prompt to generate ideas can be great fun. I always enjoy the process.

Chitrangada Sharan from New Delhi, India on July 23, 2017:

This is an engaging and wholesome hub!

I agree with your views and explanation of writing prompts. They stimulate the creative side of the writer and I have enjoyed responding to them.

You have brilliantly combined so many aspects of writing in this hub, each one beautiful.

Thanks for sharing!

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on November 22, 2016:

Thank you once again for such an interesting and kind comment, Manatita. The thought of one humanity united in love is truly beautiful, especially at this difficult time in our history. I'll explore Sri Chinmoy's ideas in more detail. Blessings to you.

.

manatita44 from london on November 22, 2016:

Thanks Alicia.

I now understand what you mean. I only have great things to say about you. I can feel your Spirit. Someone I know, in fact a disciple brother of mines, sent me this today:

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Now more than ever, our world need us to jump into the manifestation-world with utmost self-giving and eagerness.

Regardless of your political belief or nationality or race, we are one humanity – and, truth to tell, all around us we are seeing much frightful division.

Let it be us, The Supreme's sons and daughters, who will courageously offer His message of loving oneness. In each and every daily interaction and in and through all our divine manifestation projects, may God's own kindness and goodness radiate brightly.

“When I love the world

With my Master’s breath

 Inside my love,

I conquer the heart

Of each and every human being

 On earth.”

Sri Chinmoy, Seventy-Seven Thousand Service-Trees, Part 35, Agni Press, 2004, #34898

I believe that you strive to live this beautiful philosophy. Higher blessings!

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on November 21, 2016:

Hi, Shyron. I appreciate your visit and comment. Thank you very much for the link, too. Blessings to you as well.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on November 21, 2016:

Thank you very much for such a kind and interesting comment, Manatita. I appreciate it a great deal.

Shyron E Shenko from Texas on November 21, 2016:

Alicia, thank you for the story Wales, the Island and introducing us to Brenda Chamberlain, I thought I was linked to al of John's participants in his writing challenge, now I have to make sure I have a link to yours.

Beautiful poem.

Blessings my friend

manatita44 from london on February 05, 2016:

Hi Linda.

If I have two comments, then delete the other one.

Hi Again. I didn't want to forget this, so I stopped reading and came here. You're an excellent writer, and show much empathy in your writing. I like that. Again, you write with what I call 'an English feel' yet you seem to come from somewhere else. I will return here in a minute.

I'm back, like Arnold Swarzenegger, and I'm so glad that I spent some time here. Your poem is so exquisite, so beautiful! Your well-placed quotes by others are so meaningful! Now I know hat I'm right about your empathy. After all, you seem to have read Kahlil Gibran, no easy feat.

Brenda and I are similar. I am a creative writer, and have two books to my name. I also started here with prose 6 years ago. But I am wise. As a servant of the inner Light, I find it more useful to get my message through poetry, which is naturally much shorter, and encourages the busy person more. Now many call me a poet. Don't mind. I say I do both effectively.

Simon Armitage say exactly what I say. It's uncanny, because I do not have any schooling. Yet some of what you said in your Flash, I also apply automatically to my work.

Excellent work, Linda, now I will go tic the follow box. Much Love.

P.S. Solitude is a big one for me. I enjoy solitude.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on September 25, 2015:

Thanks for the comment, newjerusalem.

victor from India on September 25, 2015:

Good tips, appreciable poem, appropriate references, and altogether you've done well in this post. Interesting methodology you handled.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on September 16, 2015:

Thank you, Nadine.

Nadine May from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa on September 16, 2015:

Interesting post and a nice ending with some poetry.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on July 27, 2015:

Thank you very much for the comment, Victoria. I appreciate your visit.

Victoria Lynn from Arkansas, USA on July 27, 2015:

Your poem is beautiful. Loneliness can really feed poetry. I am often alone, but I enjoy the solitude. Lovely hub!

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on May 06, 2015:

Thank you, Julie. I appreciate your comment and vote very much.

Julie K Henderson on May 06, 2015:

This is an informative, comprehensive, and inspiring article. Voted up. I find the phrase "depressed curled within" powerful. This lovely turn of phrase may inspire me to do a future writing exercise. Well done.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on March 08, 2015:

Thank you very much, Bruce. It's nice to meet you!

Rev Bruce S Noll HMN from Asheville NC on March 08, 2015:

Thank you Alicia for making me feel right at home learning, feeling and experiencing what you shared from head...and from heart!

I'll be back!

Bruce

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on March 08, 2015:

Thank you very much for the comment and for the votes and share, Phyllis! You are so right - it's very important that we reach out to those experiencing loneliness.

Phyllis Doyle Burns from High desert of Nevada. on March 08, 2015:

I really like your poem, Alicia - it is beautiful. Loneliness can be so devastating when there is seemingly no hope. That is why it is so important for those of us who can to reach out and fill lonely moments for those in need of companionship.

I must look up Brenda Chamberlain's short story, The Return. It sounds very interesting.

Up,U, B, I and H+

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on March 08, 2015:

Thank you very much for the kind and thoughtful comment, Patricia. I always appreciate your visits and the angels that you send! I appreciate the votes and the shares, too.

Patricia Scott from North Central Florida on March 08, 2015:

Not only is this a lovely article to read but it is filled with thoughts we should all consider. Loneliness can sneak in and steal your day even when you are surrounded by others. And as you say it can lead to depression if it is severe enough.

Well done .... Alicia...I always enjoy your work each time I visit...

Angels are on the way to you and yours this beautiful Sunday afternoon. ps

Voted up++++ g+ shared

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on February 25, 2015:

Thank you so much for the lovely comment, Insightful Tiger! I appreciate your visit. It would be wonderful if nobody ever felt lonely.

Insightful Tiger on February 25, 2015:

Beautifully and intelligently written! Brava! You inspire!

Loneliness! May it never be reclaimed!

! (and a couple more exclamation marks for emphasis) ;) !

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on February 17, 2015:

Thank you for such a kind and lovely comment, Rolly! I appreciate it so much. Best wishes from British Columbia!

Rolly A Chabot from Alberta Canada on February 17, 2015:

Hi Alicia... an amazing read and one I have bookmarked as a reference as it is so well put together. Well done and packed full of suggestions and ideas. You are an amazing writer my friend and you keep getting better each time I read your work. Love the poem...

Hugs from Alberta

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on February 12, 2015:

Thank you so much for the visit and such a kind comment, Linda! I appreciate the comment, the votes and the shares a great deal.

Linda Rogers from Minnesota on February 11, 2015:

Hi Linda-I really enjoyed this hub on writing prompts. I find them to be so fun and rewarding. Your poem was absolutely 'AMAZING'. You use such emotive words in your poem and can feel how she goes from a place of dark and depression, to a place of light. Hit many buttons, voted up and sharing all over.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 21, 2015:

Thank you, Deb.

Deb Hirt from Stillwater, OK on January 21, 2015:

Very nice creative maneuver.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 12, 2015:

Thanks for the visit and the comment, pinto2011.

Subhas from New Delhi, India on January 12, 2015:

Very nicely jotted down step by step all the necessary elements.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 12, 2015:

Thank you very much, Dip Mitra!

Dip Mtra from World Citizen on January 12, 2015:

Hey, that's awesome poetry! Voted up!

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 10, 2015:

Thank you, Mel. I'm looking forward to seeing your contribution to Jodah's challenge!

Mel Carriere from San Diego California on January 10, 2015:

Wonderfully touching poem. I am thinking about participating in Jodah's prompt myself. Great job!

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 09, 2015:

Thank you very much for the visit and the comment, Jo. There has been at least one full-length biography of Brenda Chamberlain published, which looks interesting. I'm going to see if I can find it in my local public library.

Jo Alexis-Hagues from Lincolnshire, U.K on January 09, 2015:

Beautiful poem, loved all the background information. You did a wonderful job with those words, I must look up Brenda Chamberlain.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 09, 2015:

Thank you for the visit, Rebecca. I hope your novel is going well.

Rebecca Mealey from Northeastern Georgia, USA on January 09, 2015:

Interesting! Now that i think about it, a fading rose on a rose bush was the inspiration of the best poem I've written. Thanks for sharing your experience with Jodah, and the info on these writers.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Thank you very much for the comment and for the up and awesome votes, Venkatachari M!

Venkatachari M from Hyderabad, India on January 08, 2015:

Very interesting challenge and you made it so awesome with your nice poetry. Voted up and awesome.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Thank you very much for the kind comment, shanmarie. It was an interesting and enjoyable challenge, even with the modifications!

Shannon Henry from Texas on January 08, 2015:

Oh, how interesting - the poem and the challenge! You are obviously talented and creative, even if the challenge was not met exactly.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Thank you, Bill. I appreciate your visit very much, as always, as well as the comment.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Thank you very much for the comment, Blossom!

Bill De Giulio from Massachusetts on January 08, 2015:

Hi Linda. I'm impressed. I didn't know you were a poet. I had never heard of Brenda Chamberlain so once again I learned something new. You should write more poetry :)

Bronwen Scott-Branagan from Victoria, Australia on January 08, 2015:

Great article! Enjoyed reading both the prose and poetry.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Thank you very much for the lovely comment and for creating the challenge, Jodah! I appreciate your visit and the idea for a writing prompt a great deal.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Thank you for the visit and the comment, MsDora.

John Hansen from Queensland Australia on January 08, 2015:

This is a wonderful response to my challenge AliciaC. I absolutely love the poem, and thank you for the great explanation of the story behind it and the interesting information you provided about Brenda Chamberlain an author I had not heard of. I love the way you used every word of the sentence in your poem as well. Great work.

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on January 08, 2015:

Helpful notes on writing prompts and writers. Good poetry. Thanks for this useful presentation.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Flourish, I appreciate your comment very, very much. I did creative writing long before I wrote informational articles. I'm enjoying trying it again! I find information fascinating and creative writing very fulfilling.

FlourishAnyway from USA on January 08, 2015:

Wow, Linda, this is stunning. You are ever the poet, and I enjoyed the introductory background about the woman who chose the dying man as her fixated love interest. The heart wants what it wants. I encourage you to do more creative writing like this, as you have obvious talent.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Hi, Nell. Thanks for the comment about the poem! I don't think that Brenda Chamberlain is widely known today. I'm going to learn more about her and her work. She sounds like an interesting person.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Hi, Ann. Thank you very much for the kind comment. I appreciate your visit. The only work of Brenda Chamberlain's that I've read is "The Return", but I'm looking forward to reading more of her creations!

Nell Rose from England on January 08, 2015:

Hi alicia, I had never heard of Brenda Chamberlain before so that was really interesting, and I loved your poem too, wonderful!

Ann Carr from SW England on January 08, 2015:

Beautiful poem in response to this challenge (which I've only just found out about here in your hub!).

The background history to Brenda Chamberlain is fascinating. I haven't heard of her before but will look up her name and the book.

Thanks for making us aware and for testing yourself with this challenge - great result!

Ann

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 08, 2015:

Thank you, Devika. I appreciate your comment and all your votes.

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on January 08, 2015:

Greatly written! I enjoyed reading this valuable hub. Voted up interesting and useful.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 07, 2015:

Hi, Faith. Thank you so much for such a wonderful and kind comment! As always, I'm very grateful for your votes and shares. Blessings and peace to you, too.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 07, 2015:

Thank you for the comment and the votes, Perspycacious.

Faith Reaper from southern USA on January 07, 2015:

What a beautiful and interesting hub, Linda! I loved learning all about Brenda Chamberlain as the poet and I truly love her creative writing.

Thank you for sharing your gift of poetry. Your poem is powerful and dramatic. I love it!

You are very talented in many areas.

Up ++++ tweeting, pinning, G+ and sharing

Blessings and peace always

Demas W Jasper from Today's America and The World Beyond on January 07, 2015:

Thanks for your efforts and information. Thumbs up, Useful, Interesting.

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 07, 2015:

Thank you, Gawth!

Ron Gawthorp from Millboro, Virginia on January 07, 2015:

Very nice!

Linda Crampton (author) from British Columbia, Canada on January 07, 2015:

Thank you very much, Bill. I appreciate your comment!

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on January 07, 2015:

Great explanation, nice historical notes, and lovely work with the poetry. Well done, my friend.