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Interview With Author Ayesha Boison

Reading is a series of human emotions. Writing is the gift of sharing these emotions.

interview-with-author-ayesha-boison

Introduction

Ayesha Boison is a writer and an Inkitt author. Her realm of interest and passion is genre fiction, as she often finds herself teetering between countless ideas and genres and stories and characters to develop into a new world. While Ayesha doesn’t particularly have a favorite genre to write in, she does favor several themes that she has a proclivity for including in her stories, no matter the genre: the strength of familial bonds; self-esteem/confidence/love; the force of friendship; unexpected romance. No matter what kind of story she is constructing, with those themes, she’ll find a way to include one, or all.

interview-with-author-ayesha-boison

To readers who haven’t read any of your books, which one would you recommend to them?

I would recommend ‘Alien or Alian.’ If you enjoy or have an interest in aliens and/or space travel, you could definitely have fun with this story.

How long does it take for you to write a book?

It’s hard to say as I don’t usually keep track, but I think around 6-8 months. And that’s just me writing out the whole book, start-to-finish, and performing my own edits on the manuscript before I officially start posting chapters. Usually, I write little by little each day, some nights I have longer writing bursts, and between all that I go back to edit and rethink and add.

Where did you get the idea of writing about an alien species that originated on Earth, have never been to outer space, and are curious about space travel?

I think the idea about aliens in general has been planted inside my head for years. When I was younger, I used to see weird circles of light in the sky moving in strange patterns, but at some point I realized they were likely just faint beams of light pointed at the sky from somewhere. I also used to fear those movies about alien invasions and hosts taking over bodies (still kind of do, to be honest), but as I grew older, aliens became more intriguing. Story-wise, a myriad of ideas came to me about creating my own species, but I also wanted to put a spin on it — what if they had always been on Earth, living right next to us? What if they were just as curious as we were about the outer space up there?

Which of your own books is your most favorite and why?

So far, it’s ‘Alien or Alian.’ I really enjoyed writing about something that used to freak me out to no end. I mean, I’m a bit freaked about the unknown and everything in general that lives and might lurk in outer space, but I’m also curious about it too. Space travel as well, as it’s a topic I’ve never paid so much attention to before I had written this book. Nowadays, I sometimes find myself watching a video about the latest progress NASA’s made on Mars, or looking up how many moons a certain planet has (along with the names of those moons).

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Are your characters based on real people, or do you completely create your character’s attributes from your own imagination?

I actually tend to use celebrities as outlines for my characters, mainly appearance wise so it can help me to act out scenes in my head that I want to potentially write. It doesn’t usually go beyond appearance, and I figure out the characters’ personality with my own imagination along the way as I figure out the story points and relationships and such.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

Some say midnight is the witching hour, but for me, around that time is when the creative juices flow the most, and I could write for hours on end. Just picture an owl, wide awake at the stroke of midnight at her desk, typing away at her laptop.

Can you relate to any of your characters? If yes, which character can you most relate to?

Yes. And I would say Ozias from ‘Alien or Alian’; I guess he’s actually like a caricature of me, especially when I was younger — fatally shy, a level of self-confidence somewhere close to zero, not ecstatic about his own appearance, and my all time favourite — grapples constantly with making friends. I’m definitely not too much like this now, but I remember the days, as clear as yesterday, when I was.

You’ve written a few books, and as a result, have dipped your toes into several different genres. Which genre is the most comfortable or easier to write?

I’ve attempted fantasy (very roughly, in Moonhaven/The High 5 series), I’ve tested out sci-fi, and currently I’m working on a contemporary-drama-young adult-romance-fiction-thingy — ironic that it’s hard to put into words the genre of it, but actually writing the story has been quite comfortable. With sci-fi or fantasy, there’s a lot of world-building and systems and lore to work out, which is why it can be quite tricky and frustrating for me. But not using any of that magical/paranormal realism leaves a more straightforward path for me to construct.

Are you a pantser, or a plotter?

Both. I begin as a plotter, planning out all the characters I want to star in the story, and all the major plot points I want to happen. But then, while I’m actually writing the story, getting in the details and filling in what were previous blank holes, things start to change, sometimes small-scale, occasionally large-scale. Characters grow minds of their own and start throwing suggestions at me, then suddenly I’m a pantser and so many different things that I never originally planned, sneak into the manuscript.

How do you keep yourself motivated to write?

READING. Didn’t read much when I was younger, and no wonder it took me so, so long to finally start actually writing (which was like my freshman year of university at least four years ago). Nowadays, I’m buying books left and right. Reading has become part of my weekly schedule, and because of it, my daily writing stamina is through the roof.

Have you ever had unfinished novels that you would like to get back to finishing someday?

More like an unfinished series (Moonhaven/The High 5). I didn’t finish the series because the idea basically ran dry in my mind; too many characters, convoluted plot, too long of a setup — etc. etc. I decided to leave it unfinished, but at some point between the end of last year and this year, I also decided I could try reimagining each of the stories that are already finished, but I would make drastic changes though; genre, characters, plot, etc. Some details would change, others would stay.

What is your current project, and what would you like to say to your readers?

And that brings me to the final question. My current project, essentially a reimagining of Moonhaven (a new title a work in progress), will feature many of the same characters and plot points/story from the original book. One of the few, though major differences, is that it won’t include any fantasy genre in it. It’s that ‘contemporary-drama-young adult-romance-fiction-thingy’ that I mentioned earlier, and I’m almost done writing it, so chapters will arrive soon (before 2022 ends) and be posted on Inkitt where I typically publish stories. And you can find my profile here ayeshaB's Profile - Inkitt — where you can follow me or add my books to your own reading list and receive updates, and even read my books for free too! All my completed books live here, including ‘Alien or Alian.’ I hope you can check it out!

© 2022 Shey Saints

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