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About the Haiku and Life of the Japanese Samurai Warrior : Bamboo Poems.

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Pride of appearance and style.

Looking good was important for showing one's confidence and personal attributes. Same Today.

Looking good was important for showing one's confidence and personal attributes. Same Today.

Common Battle Dress.

The handmade armor had metal plates woven into it in an effort to minimise damage to the warrior. But a musket ball would pass right through it.

The handmade armor had metal plates woven into it in an effort to minimise damage to the warrior. But a musket ball would pass right through it.

The Katana was the Samurai.

The tempered steel of the blade was made up of as many as 300 folds, thus giving strength and style to the soul within.

The tempered steel of the blade was made up of as many as 300 folds, thus giving strength and style to the soul within.

Changing times for a Samurai.

The Japanese Samurai were arguably the greatest warriors in modern history; living their entire life by the Code of Bushido; the samurai code of honor. About the Haiku and Life of the Japanese Samurai Warrior : Bamboo Poems; by Pearldiver gives a glimpse of another side of the state of being a Samurai. In feudal Japan, the country was effectively ruled by warlords (Diamyo) who independently served the Emperor, yet collectively served the emperor's choice of Shogun. The Shogun was the most powerful entity and was endorsed by the emperor as being the ultimate military leader; based on his ability to control, his background, courage, victories and strategic planning abilities.

Each Samurai was trained from birth to be a professional fighting unit; along with learning of culture, arts and social protocol. To be a Samurai, one could not be a landowner, unless they had reached the status of diamyo. Yet a Samurai held the power of life or death over landowners, villagers and subordinates. Being a Samurai was to be completely loyal to their leader (daimyo) and to pledge their life and lifetime to the achievement of the Daimyo's objectives.

Honor was paramount to a Samurai's life and as such; dishonor ultimately meant death; which was often self administered in a ceremony called Seppuku. The Samurai was required to 'open his belly' with his wakizashi; the shorter of the two swords that he carried. In this way, his death was as honorable as if he had died in battle.

If he was required to commit seppuku, the Samurai was able to have a friend decapitate him with his katana; the longer sword; if it was felt the pain was such that he cried out. To a Samurai, death in the service of his master was the ultimate act of honor. The Samurai's most prized possessions were his daisho (swords), his kabuto (battle helmet) and his personal body armor. Samurai's were known by their elaborate dress, strength of character and highly focused mastery of the martial arts.

When the Portuguese introduced the musket to warring factions in Japan; this single act brought about a complete change in the ethics of battle and heralded the end of those who refused to adapt to the new ways; which were though effective; regarded as being a less than honorable way of war.

Until muskets, Japanese development had been backed through the power of the sword and highly trained warriors. With the musket, even unskilled villagers could beat the best trained warriors in battle. War had become less personal and the old ways of the Samurai warriors were destined to take their place in history.

The Japanese love of the beauty of their surroundings was of equal importance to the men who devoted their lives to war. In peace times many samurai took up the arts, writing and teaching; to fill their time. This practice lead to the extensive use of attaching a battle banner to the back of their armor on with each individual warrior had written either a taunting challenge to, an introductory boast of his skills, or his Death Wish, in either 3 lines of Haiku or 5 lines of Tanka verse. Below are a selection of different Haiku verse for the important aspects of life that graced and applied to the many who found their peace a time to reflect. Please..... Enjoy.

Status was worn throughout.

Always being prepared was key to a samurai's survival. However, before a battle, they also prepared for an honorable death.

Always being prepared was key to a samurai's survival. However, before a battle, they also prepared for an honorable death.

State your name and village.

It was a custom in battle to tell your opponent who you are and where you come from and vice versa, before attacking each other. In this way, battles were a personal statement of your reputation; while also serving to honor your opponent.

It was a custom in battle to tell your opponent who you are and where you come from and vice versa, before attacking each other. In this way, battles were a personal statement of your reputation; while also serving to honor your opponent.

Thoughts of: Preparedness.


Bathed and top knot set

A head fragrant so not to offend;

The master of katana.


oooOooo


Shitabi, armor and daisho

May only seasons temper my wakizashi;

Death always within reach.

Thoughts of: Battle.

 

Your name and village

Death honors all who meet my courage;

We each serve one outcome.

haiku-of-the-samurai-warrior

A clash of different cultures.

The Japanese found that the Portuguese had an aversion to bathing daily and were astonded that Portuguese missionaries did not support their preaching that cleanliness was equal to Godliness.

The Japanese found that the Portuguese had an aversion to bathing daily and were astonded that Portuguese missionaries did not support their preaching that cleanliness was equal to Godliness.

Ten thousand fight as one

Banners speak of fate; read the omen;

Blood red sky over these lands

Thoughts of: New change.

 

Foreigners come by sea

No devine wind will sink boats;

But that of change.

 

oooOooo

 

Strange western ways

That to bath; is not in style;

Yet speak of culture.

Kubuki: An act of no words.

Kubuki theatre was a social event in which the male actors played all roles within the story set in music; without words.

Kubuki theatre was a social event in which the male actors played all roles within the story set in music; without words.

Thoughts of Kabuki.

 

What role plays you snake

Kabuki treachery or enemy within;

Your presence felt always.

Peace times were hard for the samurai warriors.

Trained for warfare; the thought of battle is never far from the warriors mind. Change was also hard to counter.

Trained for warfare; the thought of battle is never far from the warriors mind. Change was also hard to counter.

Thoughts of: Future battles.

 

Oh times of peace

We long for the tanquility of war;

Stone gardens too complex.

 

oooOooo

 

Swift cold winds of change

All seasons now seem blended into one;

Katana be swifter than musket.

Okita of the tea house: Utamaru

haiku-of-the-samurai-warrior

Thoughts of: Okita.

 

I remember your smell

Heat and taste of carressing touch;

Okita; this tea so intense.

The tranquility of home scenes.

Like anyone visions of home held special place in the lives and thoughts of the samurai.

Like anyone visions of home held special place in the lives and thoughts of the samurai.

Thoughts of: Tenryu River.

 

Tears of distant hills

Blunt broken stones to unknown destiny;

Go; flow to your sea.

Friendship of one's peers.

Popularity and friendship ensured that in battle your back was covered from attack.

Popularity and friendship ensured that in battle your back was covered from attack.

Thoughts of: Honored friends.

 

Faces of good friends lost

Saki cries out; finishing jokes made;

In battle we laugh again.

 

oooOooo

 

I remember you Tanaka

Your kabuto worn again by a son;

Quick of mind, like you.

Solitary skills equal survival.

It was said that the ability to rise above adverse conditions made the worth a Samurai that of 100 basic fighting men. Old age was not a reason to abandon the strength and skills of a Samurai.

It was said that the ability to rise above adverse conditions made the worth a Samurai that of 100 basic fighting men. Old age was not a reason to abandon the strength and skills of a Samurai.

Thoughts of: Growing old.

Snow showers scar tired wings

Blue clouds draw strength of will no more;

Rise wings; above all storms.

oo0oo

Take me to a battle;

This growing old is far too tame

Samurai don't wait to die.

ooo0ooo

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Words of the Master Samurai.

The greatest change in war.

The Portuguese in feudal Japan, came selling Christianity, Muskets and Trading Goods. Never again would the lives and deaths of the Samurai in warfare, be one of personally greeting their opponents in battle in an honorable face to face manner. The use of muskets meant that a traditional Samurai's opponent changed that long standing custom; with a musket ball fired from the distance, at an unknown and now disadvantaged warrior.

They said that a Samurai was as elegant as cherry blossom petals and in some ways, as fragile; in that it only took one a single storm to destroy the balance. That storm was the effect of change brought about by the power of the gun, over opponents who could not counter it's effectiveness, without giving up their honorable ways. Haiku was written extensively by the Japanese Samurai Warriors and it served as a release to men who were expected to maintain a stern order over others. The Samurai by social position alone; carried with him the power of life or death over his subordinates. The beauty of Japanese Haiku verse is emphasized within the writings of the old masters, many of whom lived and died as members of the Samurai Code. The Book of 5 Rings (available by clicking on the Amazon books link) is compulsory reading if you have a passion for this amazing warrior creed or are learning any form of Martial Art.

Thank you for reading this work and in that way allowing the spirit of the Samurai to live on.

Pearldiver.

Did You Vote Above:

If you have enjoyed this piece then please do leave a comment below. That way as writers we get to appreciate our readers more interactively. Take care.

© Copyright 2009 - 2015 Rob Welsh - Pearldiver with all rights reserved.

A Tribute to Japan: Courage: Beyond Tsunami Waves.

More Haiku and Samurai Life.

Yuki - A Tribute to Japan - By Pearldiver. (Link is Above).

Courage - Beyond Tsunami Waves

Courage - Beyond Tsunami Waves

Thank you for reading this work.

Thank you for reading this work.  I hope it has helped to understand parts of the life of the Samurai of ancient Japan.  Pearldiver.

Thank you for reading this work. I hope it has helped to understand parts of the life of the Samurai of ancient Japan. Pearldiver.

More Haiku by Pearldiver.

  • Seasons of Haiku
    In Haiku Poetry words are crafted to create a powerful and sensual image of the everyday things in the lives of the Japanese. Traditional Haiku emphasises that 17 Syllables only can be used to create that...

Thank you for leaving your comment.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on December 17, 2015:

Hi Lady E, thank you so much for your compliments. I'm glad that you enjoyed this popular collection of haiku. Cheers, you take care.

Elena from London, UK on October 05, 2015:

Absolutely lovely and the photos are so unique. Thanks

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on August 13, 2012:

Hi Angelo52, thank you for taking the time to read and review this popular work... I appreciate your positive input... the history of early Japan is very interesting and I hope that I've done it justice with it here... Cheers.. take care.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on August 12, 2012:

Hi ignugent17, thanks very much for taking the time to read this work and to leave a positive comment. I'm glad that you enjoyed my efforts with this article... cheers.. take care.

Angelo52 on August 07, 2012:

Excellent presentation of the history and the haikus are wonderful.

ignugent17 on August 07, 2012:

Enjoyed it!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on January 30, 2012:

Hi there Scarface, thanks I appreciate your compliment... yes, aren't we creative people lucky that the world is full of experts! Amazing... and some of them are so clever that they even leave their IP Addresses on their spammy posts, thinking that they are anonymous! How sad and tiresome that they feel a need to show us all what they are really short of!

Scarface1300 on January 30, 2012:

Great response my friend. Love it!!! This answer alone is Voted UP and Awesome. ps/ This hub is highly ranked and well read for a reason. Rock on

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on January 30, 2012:

mr. alex... I don't believe I stated anywhere within this article that I was writing 'traditional' haiku! How disappointing that someone who is factually the first person to criticize this work out of well over 20,000 other readers, is so knowledgeable of the art that they were unaware that the plural of Haiku is Haiku and not haikus!

Sorry you found no value in my writing... I guess with all the Traditional BS in the world today.. it's bloody lucky that some of us can rise above it, write exactly the way we choose to successfully and still remain able entertain k'town cynics that seem to feel shortchanged by their own lack of significance! Thanks for your trivia mate!

alex on January 30, 2012:

mr. pearldiver, your haikus dont follow the traditional form of haiku which is 5-7-5 syllables per stanza.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on December 20, 2011:

Hello Scarface 1300, I hope your scars were earned on the battlefield. Glad you appreciate this article, it is very highly ranked and well read. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment on it.. take care.

Scarface1300 on December 20, 2011:

Stunning!!!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on October 25, 2011:

Hi saif, thank you for taking the time to read and comment on this article. All the best.. glad you enjoyed my work.

@Writer:D - thanks very much. I appreciate your support. Take care.

Winter:D on October 24, 2011:

Your poems were extremly well writen. That was such an interesting reading.

saif113sb on July 30, 2011:

Beautiful hub. thanks

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on December 17, 2010:

Hi SpringW, thanks for reading this haiku and historical look at the Samurai, who were expected to be well versed in haiku as much as martial arts. Take Care.

SpringW from Phoenix, AZ on December 17, 2010:

I loved the poetry. Lets you into their minds on such a personal level. Like reading a diary in a way. Thanks

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on October 13, 2010:

Hi Sa'ge, Thanks for taking the time to read these Haiku. I'm glad that you enjoyed the verses and appreciate your kind comments. Take Care.

Sa`ge from Barefoot Island on October 13, 2010:

Beautiful, thank you such beauty, I danced on your buttons this is truly a beauty. aloha

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 04, 2010:

Hi DarkDisOrder, thanks for taking the time to read this work and your kind comment. This is a very popular hub that gives an unexpected and accurate slant on the Samurai. Take Care.

DarkDisOrder from B.A.D. (Beyond All Dimensions) on September 04, 2010:

This is a brilliant hub, well done...

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on August 18, 2010:

Hi Doc Snow, thanks for taking the time to read this unique hub. Glad you enjoyed it. Take Care.

Doc Snow from Camden, South Carolina on August 17, 2010:

Thanks for a unique Hub, pearldiver!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on June 07, 2010:

Hi Enelle, thanks for following the link to here. I'm glad that you enjoyed this work. I also have an interest in Asia and the amazing history and arts. Cheers for the opportunity @ Klatch, maybe we can grow it over the while. Take care Enelle.

Enelle Lamb from Canada's 'California' on June 07, 2010:

Followed your link - great hub and thoroughly enjoyed the haikus. I have always had an interest in Asian artwork and martial arts and always admired your kabuto avatar.

Thanks for adding your links to the Koffee Klatch :D was awesome to see you there!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on June 03, 2010:

Hi Maryanne.. how is the surf today? Thanks for reading this work. Traditional Japanese art is renowned for its simplicity of form, movement and beauty. Haiku alone is the simple creation of a moving mental picture in only a few well chosen words. Good luck with your articles. Take care.

Maryanne Maguire from Santa Monica, CA on June 03, 2010:

Beautiful image above. Love their art work of all forms.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on May 21, 2010:

Hi DD, thanks for reading these haiku. I'm glad you enjoyed this work. Take care and thanks again.

Deborah Demander Reno from First Wyoming, then THE WORLD on May 21, 2010:

Wow. Your haiku is beautiful.

Namaste.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on April 22, 2010:

Hi pinkhawk, thanks for taking the time to read my works and comment. Take care and be well.

pinkhawk from Pearl of the Orient on April 18, 2010:

...very interesting, I used to watch movies (like Goemon..etc) or even anime (like Samurai X) about samurai, scary and brutal but their moves are fascinating..they can be bad,they can be good depending upon their masters I think?!!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on April 05, 2010:

Hi MM, thanks for taking the time to read this work. I hope you found the hub interesting. Take care and be well.

Moulik Mistry from Burdwan, West Bengal, India on April 03, 2010:

I love samurai topics and I have watched a few samurai films by Kurosawa...

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on March 31, 2010:

Hi Mythbuster, thanks for reading this hub my friend. I'm pleased that you called by as it has made me get back to reading the hubs of those that I follow. Hope all is well with you and I know you have alot of great reading in store for me. See you soon.. take care.

mythbuster from Utopia, Oz, You Decide on March 30, 2010:

This is a great hub, Pearldiver. The poetry as well as historical bits are very enjoyable. Thanks for publishing.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on March 25, 2010:

Hi sophs, thank you for reading my work and for taking the time to comment on this. I'm glad you enjoyed this hub and look forward to reading your works. Take Care and be well.

sophs on March 25, 2010:

Great hub! And beautiful haikus. I enjoyed this, thanks for sharing :)

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on March 21, 2010:

Hi Moulik, thank you for reading and enjoying this work. It has surprised me how much this Haiku is read lately.. it was my first attempt at writing Haiku. Take care.

Moulik Mistry from Burdwan, West Bengal, India on March 19, 2010:

Beautiful haikus, very well done - loved them all...

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on February 26, 2010:

Hi Cathi, thanks for that and for passing on that G word. Take care.

Cathi Sutton on February 26, 2010:

Grovvie is a groovie word!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on December 20, 2009:

Hi MG, Thanks for reading this work. The samurai of ancient Japan lived by a relatively simple code which survived 1000 years and today is really only seen by the world via the martial arts. Every part of the 'being' is passed on including the mastery and time involved in making the katana in the exact manner as was practiced throughout time.

There is much to be fascinated by and learnt from the samurai and their history. Take care and have a great xmas MG.

Money Glitch from Texas on December 20, 2009:

I've always had a fascination with the Samurai Warrior! So I thoroughly enjoyed the reading of this hub. You have a unique way of bringing your poetry to life via your words and pictures.

Thanks for sharing!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on December 20, 2009:

Hi Shelly, Thanks for reading my work and for your comments. You also have interesting works, I hope you enjoy the beauty of Asia. Take care and have a great Xmas.

Shelly Bryant from Singapore and/or Shanghai on December 19, 2009:

Wow! what an excellent Hub.

Thanks for the great information, and for the haiku. Nicely done.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on November 24, 2009:

Hello Prettydarkhouse, Thank you. This is a mixed bag hub. I wrote the Haiku first, but it didn't seem that I had enough content, so filled in the spaces, lol. Cheers for reading and appreciating this work. Take Care.

prettydarkhorse from US on November 24, 2009:

hi PD, you've got a nice hub here, I am from Asia, and who wouldn't love the katana---the samurai. I enjoyed the haiku verses too. Thanks so much for the added information and for a glimpse of Japans culture, Maita

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on November 24, 2009:

We have them too.. And Bumble Town movers and shakers (for what they're worth.. full of their own collective set of highly questionable anomalies).

Perhaps the next Bumble Town hub will show them in their true light Em? At least you can tax a certain amount of the corruption hahaha. It takes a great deal of courage to fall on your sword Em.

emievil from Philippines on November 24, 2009:

"Bushido: It was in many respects a code that called for total dedication excellence; so it wouldn't work for politicians." - I knew this would be your answer. Doesn't stop me from hoping that they commit hara-kiri when they do not achieve that excellence :). Would lessen the number of corrupt politicians that we have :P. :)

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on November 24, 2009:

Hello Em, Thanks for reading this and your comment. Bushido: It was in many respects a code that called for total dedication excellence; so it wouldn't work for politicians. Where in BT did I learn? Bumble Town would have little appreciation of Haiku Em.. I taught myself. Take Care.

emievil from Philippines on November 24, 2009:

It's just too bad that the samurai is a thing of the past (I think?). We, especially the politicians :), would have learned a great deal from them and their code of honor.

Thanks for sharing the info PD. And thanks for the haiku. Where in Bumbletown did you learn to write such good haiku?

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on November 23, 2009:

Hi Hmrjmr1, Thank you for taking the time to read this work and your kind comments. I look forward to reading your works in the near future. Take Care.

Hmrjmr1 from Georgia, USA on November 23, 2009:

Pearldiver - Great Haiku writings, looking forward to more in your time, Bless the wind in your pen..

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on November 22, 2009:

Hi Cagsil, You're Welcome. Thanks for taking the time to ead this work. Take Care.

Raymond D Choiniere from USA on November 22, 2009:

Pretty cool hub. Thank you for sharing.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on November 04, 2009:

Hi Kimberly, Glad you enjoyed it and thank you for your comment. The way of the Samurai is one of personal and collective discipline and understanding. We can all learn something from the way they lived. Take Care.

lyricsingray on November 04, 2009:

beautiful hub - i loved the part about always being prepared, as well, before battle, being prepared for death, thanks, Kimberly

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on October 29, 2009:

Hello prasetio, Thank you for your comments. I'm pleased that you enjoyed this work. I enjoyed writing it and tried to cover a lot of information in this work. Take care.

prasetio30 from malang-indonesia on October 29, 2009:

nice information. I learn much about samurai here.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on October 09, 2009:

Hi Art, Cheers for reading this work And your comment. Yep Phar Lap was a good one; bred and born here and adopted by the Aussis. Take care.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 27, 2009:

Hi rebekahELLE, Thank you. Yes the film The Last Samurai was a pretty good movie that was filmed in New Zealand and depicted the emmense effects of change to feudal Japan. In that movie it all related to American carbine rifles, introduced many years after the muskets which the Portuguese had changed their world. Thanks for your kind comment, I'm glad you enjoyed this work. Take care.

rebekahELLE from Tampa Bay on September 27, 2009:

I loved reading this Pearldiver! Beautiful. The haiku is wonderful to read. I'll always remember The Last Sumurai, such an amazing movie about these dedicated warriors.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 27, 2009:

Hi loveofnight, thanks for reading my work and your comment. I hope you learnt something from my site then; if so, I hope it was good lol. Good luck with your writing and welcome to HP. Take care.

Loveofnigjht Anderson from Baltimore, Maryland on September 27, 2009:

i learned something today, thank you it was a good read.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 26, 2009:

Hi dohn, Appreciate your kind comments and I'm glad you enjoyed this work. Thank you for reading this. The Samurai and whole feudal system of the 15th and 16th centuries hold a fascination for me. There was so much change in their lives during this period along with times of peace which effectively heralded the end of these professional warriors.

dohn121 from Hudson Valley, New York on September 26, 2009:

I really enjoyed reading this, Pearldiver. Thank you for this fascinating and informative hub! I've always have been intrigued by the ways of the samurai. Seven Samurai is on my Top Ten list...Akira Kurosawa was a gift to all of us.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 17, 2009:

Hi Brenda, Thanks for reading. A Katana is the longer of the two swords that were carried by the Samurai as his primary weapon. Take care Brenda, I appreciate your comments.

\Brenda Scully on September 17, 2009:

think i will go to work all day tomorrow easier than the forums what......... nice to see you any way great hub, what is a Katana if you don't mind me asking

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 17, 2009:

Hmmm Candie.... That is Not my Katana!

Candie V from Whereever there's wolves!! And Bikers!! Cummon Flash, We need an adventure! on September 17, 2009:

Hmmm.... Pearldiver is that your katana under your cloak or are you just happy to see me? *giggles*

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 15, 2009:

Hi Clara, pleased you found it informative and enjoyed it. Thanks for checking my work out.. I will do the same with yours. Nice to meet you. Take Care.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 15, 2009:

Hi Alekhouse, Thank you very much, I'm glad you enjoyed this. Their lives were so structured and yet simple, so I too have always liked the old Japanese style and art. I'm sorry that I 'hooked' you on this... I usually do that with my fishing hubs. Thanks again for your positive input. Take Care.

Clara Ghomes on September 15, 2009:

hi Pearldiver,

i like your hub.It is quite informative.Good keep it up.

Nancy Hinchliff from Essex Junction, Vermont on September 15, 2009:

I loved this, Pearldiver...the drama and the ceremony is really alluring. The Haiku and images were equally captivating. I so like Japanese drawings. So you really hooked me....Thanks so much.

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 15, 2009:

Hi Candie, Dr. Kildare eh? hahaha... Do you know how long ago that was? And now You have brought him back to life. Thanks for reading this Candie & your always positive comments. Wow... if I can do that with topics... I wonder...

Candie V from Whereever there's wolves!! And Bikers!! Cummon Flash, We need an adventure! on September 14, 2009:

Pearldiver, you always bring your topics to life for me. I found I was remembering the old Shogun movie with Richard Chamberlain. You clarified so much for me. Thank you!

Rob Welsh (author) from Tomorrow - In Words & NZ Time. on September 14, 2009:

Hi Xtasis, Thank you, you are most welcome. Pleased you enjoyed a little bit of history. Take Care.

XTASIS from The Beginning on September 14, 2009:

Good haikus ! I enjoyed reading ! Thank you !