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How Comic Books Changed My Life

Screw The Comics Code Fascist Authority (watch video to understand)

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The Real Cool Kids

The Real Cool Kids

Bane Breaks Batman's Back, in this Iconic Splash Page

Bane Breaks Batman's Back, in this Iconic Splash Page

My Brain on Comic Books

I started reading comic books at a young age, and I always preferred reading older comics rather than the newer ones. The older ones were very colorful and stick out more so than the newer ones with some exceptions.

Comic book heroes are drawn like their costumes are painted on because most of the early artists in the comic industry had a background in figure drawing and in figure drawing you would always draw a nude model to get all the rawness of the human body without clothing restricting their movements or flattening their musculature.

Most of the great comics book artists have an extensive background in fine art... With the notable exception of Jack Kirby who was almost purely self-taught and thus had a more unique, if less refined style, compared to other comic artists at the time.

Frank Frazetta basically grew up in an art school when he was young his parents enrolled him in art school at the Brooklyn Academy of fine arts. His deep background in fine art led him to be a more realistic and detail-oriented artist than most other artists in comics at the time and he would also do even more impressive paintings for cover and posters.

More stylized artists like Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, and other similar artists during the golden and silver ages of comics are among my favorite artists whose style greatly influenced how I draw and how I view sequential storytelling.

The animated shows about superheroes from the '90s were my first introduction to comic book related media. I still had not read an actual comic yet and had only read comic stripes from newspapers at that point. After the cavalcade of movies that came out in the early two thousand's about comic book superheroes I started pestering my parents to buy me comics but there weren't any comic book shops were I lived so took what I could get from supermarkets or find inside DVD's (dee-vee-dees) or cereal boxes.

Eventually, in my early teens, I got to use the internet and was able to read more comics. I even got into horror comics and learned you could tell almost any story you want in comics, in any genre, and you can mix horror with superheroes or romance or whatever you want, without the higher costs of producing a tv show or movie.

And it's because of this I've clung to working in comic books as my dream career. Their stories are often better in their original form, and you tell whatever story you want without the restrictions of a budget or special effects. Comic books have defined me as an artist and a writer and made helped me decide what I want to do with the rest of my life.

One of the most moving scenes in comic history from Steve Ditko's Spider-Man: If This Be My Destiny

One of the most moving scenes in comic history from Steve Ditko's Spider-Man: If This Be My Destiny

How Comic Books Changed The Way We (as a society) View Art

Comic book heroes are drawn like their costumes are painted on. This is because most of the early comic book artists had a background in figure drawing, and in figure drawing, you'd always have a nude model. This showed all the rawness of the human body without clothing restricting their movements or flattening their musculature.

Most of the classic comics book artists had an extensive background in fine art... With the notable exception of Jack Kirby who was almost purely self-taught, and thus had a more unique, if less refined style.

When frank Frazetta was young, his parents enrolled him in the Brooklyn Academy of fine arts. His deep background in fine art led him to be a more realistic and detail-oriented artist than most other artists in comics at the time, and he'd do even more impressive paintings for covers and posters.

During the golden and silver ages of comics, the most influential artists included more stylized artists and writers like; jack Kirby, Joe Simon, bill finger, Steve Ditko, Jim Steranko, Will Eisner, and many others.

Many comic book artists and writers didn't just work in superheroes. Almost all of them have made strides in several genres of comics and graphic novels. More recent artists and writers like Alan Moore... Dave Gibbons, Brian Bolland, frank miller, and even more recently...Alex ross, as well as a slew of other greats, have helped comic books and graphic novels stay relevant and popular.

Comic book stories are often better told in their original form, there's always something lost in translation, or in this case, adaptation. In comics, you can tell whatever story you want without the restrictions of a budget or special effects. Because comic books are relatively cheap to make, and almost anyone can get into them.

If you try hard enough you can even publish your work independently. That's part of the reason why they're so beloved. They're a book without being a book, and a movie without being a movie. The best of both worlds, and a great way to tell a story.

Biran Bolland and Alan Moore's Killing Joke another excellent example of a page layout and the panels are iconic. The film adaptation wasn't good, but at least it didn't mess with this scene.

Biran Bolland and Alan Moore's Killing Joke another excellent example of a page layout and the panels are iconic. The film adaptation wasn't good, but at least it didn't mess with this scene.

Another one of the greatest pages in all comics history. From Watchmen By Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.

Another one of the greatest pages in all comics history. From Watchmen By Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.

Another iconic example of a splash page of Peter Parker giving up being Spider-Man.

Another iconic example of a splash page of Peter Parker giving up being Spider-Man.

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