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Growing Bigger as Told by A Little Acorn in Charming Picture Book

Cindy Hewitt is a retired teacher with a passion for children's literature. Read-aloud stories add quality to a child's life experiences.

Beautifully Illustrated Story of How an Acorn Becomes a Giant Oak Tree

Read along to grow an oak tree

Read along to grow an oak tree

A Little Acorn's Journey to Becoming a Giant Oak Tree

All small children wish to be bigger and anxiously await the day when they are big enough. Bridget Heos's Treemendous: Diary of a Not Yet Mighty Oak is a delightful and beautifully illustrated picture book that charts a little acorn's journey to becoming a big oak tree. Small children will want to read along as the acorn grows and they can see that all things little wish to be big. The little acorn finds its place in the world when it is finally a big oak tree. Young readers will find this a positive story about growing to find their place in the world as they grow bigger.

The little acorn charts its growth by years and days. The story is written in diary form with dates recorded for each step of growth along the way. Fall finally comes and the little acorn falls to the ground. A squirrel hides the little acorn and this begins the growth process. Roots, stem, and leaves appear in the spring of year 3. By the fall of year 3, the little acorn is now a small tree. How exciting! The years move along and by year 10 in April the little acorn is finally a giant oak tree.

Mike Ciccotello contributes his talents as an illustrator to show the stages of growth of the little acorn into a giant oak tree. He includes an illustration of the process called photosynthesis that trees go through. He also includes an illustration of the anatomy of the oak tree. All parts of the tree are labled. An illustration of a cut-out to show the rings of a tree is also included. Heos includes a list of additional books that tell the story of trees and oak trees in particular. A website to learn more about trees is also included.

Treemendous: Diary of a Not Yet Mighty Oak was published by Crown Books for Young Readers, a division of Penguin/Random House, and is recommended for ages 4-8. It has an ISBN of 978-0-525-57936-6.

Beautiful Illustrations in Deep Colors Tell the Growth of the Little Acorn

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Bring Treemendous: Diary of a Not Yet Mighty Oak Into Your Classroom

Picture books were always my go-to tool for introducing a variety of topics in my early childhood classroom. I especially enjoyed teaching science concepts to my young students. Bridget Heos's Treemendous: Diary of a Not Yet Might Oak is a delightful choice for teaching the science of how an oak tree grows. The illustrations are done in rich warm colors and tell the story of the little acorn's growth journey into a giant oak tree. We will celebrate Arbor Day in April and this picture book is a great choice to help celebrate this special day.

*Read Treemendous: Diary of a Not Yet Mighty Oak in your story time session.

*Have a handful of real acorns available for children to examine. Call attention to the little "cap" that the acorn wears.

*Call attention to the other kinds of trees that the text mentions that are in the forest.

*Call attention to what happens to the little acorn in the fall. Read along to the first spring date when the acorn develops roots, stem, and leaves.

*What happens to the leaves of the little tree in the fall? Bring in some red fall leaves from an oak tree in your community if possible when you read the story each fall.

*The process of photosynthesis with an illustration is included. Call attention to the things needed for the tree leaves to grow.

*Call attention to purpose of tree bark. Children will be interested in the fact that the bark carries food to all of the tree parts.

*Engage the children in a discussion of the purpose of the roots. A fun experiment is to place a stalk of celery into a glass of red food coloring to illustrate the process that roots have in soaking up water for the tree.

*Heos also includes a part of the story to tell that trees help with global warming.

*Call attention to the illustration of the cut-out of a tree and look at the rings. You might bring in a cut-out of a tree from a log and have the students examine actual rings.

*Heos includes a list of other children's books about trees. Have these available for your students.

*Celebrate Arbor Day with your students. Heos includes the website for Arbor Day, a website about climate change, and more about discovering trees. You might have the opportunity for your students to plant a tree at school for Arbor Day.

*If you are homeschooling your child, find a place in your yard to plant a tree for Arbor Day.

© 2021 Cindy Hewitt

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