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Grammar Mishaps: I vs. Me

When do you use "I" and when do you use "me"?

It is a common occurrence to hear the incorrect usage of "I" and "me". This is one of the simplest grammar corrections. "I" is a pronoun that must be the subject of a verb. "Me" is a pronoun that must be the object of the verb. The easiest way to decipher the two is to remove the other noun from the sentence and see if it still makes sense.

Examples of the correct use of "I"

  • Georgia and I went to the beach this weekend.

By removing the other noun, it becomes "I went to the beach this weekend." "Me went to the beach this weekend" doesn't make sense.

  • She and I have to make a cake.

"I have to make a cake." "She has to make a cake." "Her has to make a cake" and "Me has to make a cake" do not make sense.

Examples of the correct use of "me"

  • Please come with Julia and me to the park.

Removing Julia make this: "Please come with me to the park." "Please come with I to the park" doesn't make sense.

  • I heard the teacher talking about him and me.

"I heard the teacher talking about me" and "I heard the teacher talking about him." "I heard the teacher talking about I," or "I heard the teacher talking about he" doesn't make sense.

The Definitive Guide to Grammar: Strunk and White

Thoughts, Comments or Questions?

Sharice on November 04, 2014:

Robin, thank you so much. Actually I already put "I" rather than "me" but someone commented on my grammar and got me confused. But now I'm confident with my answer :)

Robin Edmondson (author) from San Francisco on November 04, 2014:

"He's taller than I" is the correct sentence. You could finish the sentence to double check: "He's taller than I am tall." You wouldn't say, "He's taller than me is tall." so you know that "I" is the correct word. :)

Sharice on November 04, 2014:

what do you think is right? "He's way more taller than I" or "He's way more taller than me"

Elizabeth Parker from Las Vegas, NV on July 09, 2013:

Helpful hub. Many people struggle with grammar.

Nina on July 24, 2012:

which is correct

She likes pineapple more than him.

Scroll to Continue

or

She likes pineapple more than he.

Glenn on June 15, 2012:

Simple Rule 1:

Remove other people from the sentence - whichever is correct in that sentence is also correct when using multiple subjects. It's also polite and therefore proper to put yourself after others in a multi-subject sentence.

Simple Rule 2:

In situations where "she" or "he" would be correct, "I" would be correct.

In situations where "her" or "him" would be correct, "me" would be correct.

Meg on February 27, 2012:

Re: Depak Dalhan- it is My friend and I were not going to the market.

Meg on February 27, 2012:

Which one is correct? "My sister is braver than I" or "My sister is braver than me"?

Walter on February 18, 2012:

I didn't read every post here, but enough of them that I wanted to chime in.

The justification for using a particular form of a pronoun should be pure grammar, not whether it "sounds right" or "makes sense." With the way so many people speak today, one almost can no longer trust whether something sounds right. "I," "she," and "he" are examples of the nominative (subjective) forms of the pronoun, whereas "me," "her," and "him" are the accusative (objective) forms. One needs to learn where and why these forms are correctly used; then there is no question.

The accusative is used as the object or indirect object of a verb, the object of a preposition (such as "with" or "for" or "by"), etc. The nominative is used as the subject of a sentence or clause, for example. Then there are verbs like "to be" which can be followed by a pronoun ("it is I"), but that pronoun is not the object of the verb and should be in the nominative case. (Here it is a predicate pronoun following a linking verb, where the predicate renames the subject.)