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How to Beat Writer's Block for Poets and Creatives

A creative writer at heart, Janis was first published at age 11. Most of her poems express core issues of love, loss, trauma, and healing.

Writer's Block Stops the Flow of Creativity in Artists

Waiting for words to flow from fingers to pen to paper or computer stalls and interrupts a writer's productivity.

Waiting for words to flow from fingers to pen to paper or computer stalls and interrupts a writer's productivity.

Writers Depend on Creative Flow

Creative writing is an unpredictable process that comes and goes like the wind.

The best writers and poets are on a constant quest to create literary works. However, when the flow suddenly stops, the most prolific writer can feel stuck and at an impasse. Creative writers long for their writing to start back up with a flow that spills over like a rising creek. But sometimes the writer's well is as dry as a desert.

Unfortunately, when the flow ceases to come on cue, writers and poets become worried about not being able to produce. It is similar to drawing a blank in the brain which interferes with the normal flow of thinking.

Lack of creative flow can hinder one's ability to write at will. This can cause anxiety to increase, coupled with a lack of confidence in one's creative writing skills. The following poem speaks to that angst.

Suggestions for addressing interruption of creative flow are given in the form of a poll.

Simple exercises can help poets and creative writers re-ignite their inspiration and creativity, returning them to writer's bliss. Use the poll and suggested resources below to rediscover your own creative flow and renew your passion to be your best.

Writer's Block Produces Blank Pages and Anxiety

Empty pages for writers create anxiety and lack of confidence.

Empty pages for writers create anxiety and lack of confidence.

"Empty Pages"


No words come forth to put on page,

The writing well is dry,

I search myself for phrase and song,

Asking how and why.


The writer's pen runs empty now,

My soul's ink all dried up,

The ink sat in the pen so long,

Like old tea in my cup.


I long so badly for the words,

I wait for them to come,

Staring at my fingertips,

Beating my mind's drum.


There is so much I want to share,

My thoughts are on lockdown,

To express myself in prose,

Would take away my frown.


I open up my heart to hear,

The words inside my soul,

One by one they trickle down,

A sight that I behold.


Looking for creative flow,

The page doth sit and wait,

Reclaiming writer energy,

Returns with twist of fate.


Patience, patience, here it comes,

I feel it flowing forth,

I think I'm back to writing now,

My spell has run its course.


A Blocked Writer's Keyboard Sometimes Lacks Productivity

A writer's stark keyboard becomes void of inspiration due to writer's block.

A writer's stark keyboard becomes void of inspiration due to writer's block.

Tips For Getting Your Creative Writing to Flow Again

Five Ways To Refill Your Empty Page

Helpful Resource for Writer's Block

  • Purdue OWL
    The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2012 Janis Leslie Evans

Comments

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on February 01, 2018:

Thank you very much for sharing as well, Ajodo. These are excellent examples to use for breaking through our writer's block. I appreciate your visit and contribution to the discussion.

Ajodo Endurance Uneojo from Lokoja, Nigeria. on January 31, 2018:

Hi Janis Leslie Evans,

Writer's block is real and from the comments below, I am tempted to believe most writers experience writers' block. That in someways bring out the beauty of your poem.

In addition to the methods suggested below, overcoming writer's block is something that needs a conscious effort. One of such conscious effort is taking a walk or drive through the town, the woods or sailing on the sea. Also, we can do something entirely different from our normal routine, these give us new ideas, sight and inspiration to connect with something to write.

Something as little as listening to a bird sing is capable of ending a prolonged writer's block.

Reading is another way. I believe anything that takes us out of our dry zone as writer into a new zone or different zone is capable of reviving the writing spirit.

Thanks for sharing!

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on June 29, 2016:

Thank you, Johnny James A. I hope this one on writer's block was helpful, too. Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment. I look forward to reading more of your work, too.

James from Boston, Massachusetts on June 29, 2016:

I love all of your hubs. They are very well written and very informative. I also like that fact that you give links to other available resources. Look forward to reading more of your articles.

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on April 08, 2016:

Thank you, so pleased you liked the poem.

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 27, 2012:

Very nice of you, I appreciate your comment. Thanks for reading and liking it.

Sean from PA on September 27, 2012:

I very much enjoyed this. As a fellow writer of poetry, you have a lot of talent :) Very strong use of imagery.

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 10, 2012:

Thanks :-)

Website Examiner on September 10, 2012:

Janshares, of course all is well, and I am glad to hear. My "critique" was all roses, but thanks for keeping an open mind. Best, W.E.

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 10, 2012:

Hi WE,

Not at all. Thank you. I appreciate all comments and points of view in this community. It's all a learning experience for me. I love the comment you left about this poem 4 days ago. That's what really matters. I appreciate the critiques and feedback on my work. I blindly walked into that other forum just sniffing around, exploring, and learning about the community. I thought I'd give a humorous response to what I was reading. So, WE, I'm good, you good? Peace.

Website Examiner on September 10, 2012:

I hope my comment was not overly offensive. Good luck with your writing!

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 10, 2012:

Hi pstraubie,

Thanks you for the nice comment, glad you could relate and found it useful.

Patricia Scott from North Central Florida on September 10, 2012:

jamshares...O, the dreaded blank page. This was well stated. I have known these same feelings and the relief of an end to the wall we reach is so freeing...So glad i found this...I will reread it in times that I face this issue again.

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 09, 2012:

Hi there,

Can't remember if I replied. Thanks for the comment about leaving it alone, coming back, then deleting it anyway. The process is truly of more value than the piece it self because more will come :-)

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 09, 2012:

Dyhannah, I added that stanza right before publishing. Thanks for noticing the sentence.

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 09, 2012:

Ryem, thanks for the comment (pressed wrong button for Dyhannah). Im glad the poem resonated with you.

Janis Leslie Evans (author) from Washington, DC on September 09, 2012:

Thanks for the great comment, Dyhannah, glad you liked it.

Ryem from Maryland on September 09, 2012:

I know the feeling of having writer's block very well. This is a great poem.

Dyhannah from Texas on September 09, 2012:

I like the line "Patience, patience, here it comes," that is so true.

Awesome work!

Rich from Kentucky on September 06, 2012:

Nice job!

When you're having a hard time writing don't force it. Get up, relax a while, and then go back to it. At that point, just start writing about anything. You'd be amazed at what you may find yourself coming up with after a few minutes of this. Take it and run with it. If it meets your standards, publish. If not, you've at least got the juices flowing and can go on to something else. I wrote five pages the other night and decided to break it up into three hubs. After putting the first together, I published, left it for ten minutes, and then came back and deleted. It just wasn't what I wanted to say. Yet, the juices were moving and I wrote another that I did publish the next day.

Your poem states the feeling all too well! Great Job!

Website Examiner on September 05, 2012:

This is wholesome and elegantly done. Maybe running on empty isn't so bad, then. I could actually sense the writer's longings through these smooth lines.

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