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Vegetables High in Carbs

Reginald is a retired educator with a passion for gardening. For the past 30 years, he has proven techniques and loves sharing with others.

vegetables-high-in-carbs

Vegetables play an important role in our diet, and we should eat them regularly. They provide carbohydrates, which are the main source of energy for the body. There are different types of vegetables with varying amounts of carbohydrates though. Some vegetables contain more carbohydrates than others. This article is about Vegetables High in Carbs and will help you understand the differences between high and low carbohydrates in the vegetables we eat.

What Are Carbohydrates?

From the National Library of Medicine comes a definition of carbohydrates that is simple and to the point.

"Carbohydrates, or carbs, are sugar molecules. Along with proteins and fats, carbohydrates are one of the three main nutrients found in foods and drinks."

Our body breaks down carbohydrates into blood sugar. This is known as Glucose and is the main source of energy for cells, tissues, and organs.

It is fair to say that we are reminded from time to time to "watch our carbs". We tend to relax on the old diet and eat too many carbs ultimately pushing out the waste line.

Basically, if we overdo the consumption of carbs our glucose or blood sugar gets too high. This condition asks your body to make more insulin, saving the extra glucose as fat. Not keeping this under control can lead to a few extra pounds and even diabetes.

As we know, this relates heavily to our intake outside the vegetable world. But we must be aware that some veggies are high in carbohydrates.

Daily Carbs for a Healthy Diet

Many of us try to stay away from eating carbohydrates as a means of weight control and blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association and other nutritional specialists emphasize that certain carbs in vegetables are fiber. Fiber slows digestion and prevents blood sugar spikes. Fiber is good and we need more fiber in our diet.

Most nutritionists will tell us that the intake of carbohydrates should make up 45 to 65 % of your total daily calories. We can break this down with a little bit of math.

Let's say that your diet takes in 2,000 calories a day. This would mean that between 900 and 1,300 calories should be carbohydrates. We can break this down to about 225 and 325 grams of carbs a day. Using this math as a guide can help you understand vegetables high in carbs.

vegetables-high-in-carbs

Vegetables High in Carbs

All vegetables that we consume contain carbohydrates (carbs). The content of each different vegetable varies because of one important factor. Water! The water content of a plant will dictate whether it is high or low in carbohydrates.

Let's look at a vegetable like a cucumber. The cucumber is mostly water, therefore is classified as being low in carbohydrates. On the other hand, a root vegetable like beets is classified as being high in carbs.

In addition, let’s add the grouping of vegetables as ‘starchy’ and ‘non-starchy’ vegetables. The thing to remember here is that starchy vegetables contain more carbs than non-starchy vegetables. Below is a rundown of the 5 five most consumed vegetables high in carbs.

Potato

The potato is one of the most popular vegetables. We love to eat potatoes in any form at any time. Oh my! Yum yum! Mashed, boiled, or fried it doesn’t matter. They provide lots of vitamins and minerals.
But did you know that the potato is starchy and high in carbohydrates? Again, another - Oh my!

One medium white potato contains 27 grams of carbohydrates, which computes to about 110 calories. Additionally, it contains 3 grams of fiber and 3 grams of protein. The potato is free of fat and cholesterol.


Sweet Potato

‌Sweet potatoes have a lot of carbohydrates. One 5-inch sweet potato has about 26 grams of carbohydrates. In a low-carb diet, one sweet potato has half of the calories from carbohydrates that you may be allowed. But that's still less than the carb content of a white potato: 35 grams, on average.


Peas

Peas are another example of starchy vegetables. They are usually eaten fresh or cooked. Peas are also known as legumes. They are available all year round and are very nutritious. One cup of peas contains around 21 grams of carbohydrates.


Corn

Corn is a type of grain. It is used to make corn chips, popcorn, and many other products. Although it does not contain any vitamins or minerals, it still contains carbohydrates. One cup of corn contains around 27 grams of carbohydrates. The USDA places cooked sweet corn as having 143 calories per 1-cup serving.

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Squash

Squash is a member of the gourd family. We love to grow these in our gardens. They taste great in salads, soups, and side dishes.

Squash is categorized into two types: Summer and Winter Squash. Summer squash has varieties such as Causa, Crookneck, Pattypan, and Zucchini. Summer squash is mostly water and is a low-carb veggie.

Winter squash has varieties also: Butternut, Hubbard, Acorn, Delicata, and Spaghetti. These winter squash varieties are categorized as high-carb vegetables. Grow these varieties in your garden and harvest them later in the season.
One of the differences between summer and winter squash is the fact that winter squash can be stored for weeks and months.

Vegetables and Your Diet

Understanding the difference between high and low carbs will help you make better choices of what to eat. Mixing higher-carb vegetables with other lower-carb foods is a better plan than an all-high-carb diet. It is a good idea to have resources you can use to help you with what you eat.

Diabetics should be especially aware of carbs and their diet. Learning how to control your sugar levels is sometimes difficult for a person with diabetes. I have several diabetic cookbooks that are extremely helpful. They are my education to better eating.

The two charts below will help you make better choices of what to eat. Mixing high-carb vegetables with low carbs will be a better plan.

If you are trying to watch what you eat it is easy to think of vegetables as a nonconcern. We all do it!

vegetables-high-in-carbs

Vegetables High in Carbs


VegetableServingCarbs Per Serving

Black-eyed peas

1 cup

100g carbs

Garbanzo beans 1 cup 126g

1 cup

126g carbs

Pinto beans

1 cup

120g carbs

White beans

1 cup

122g carbs

Lima beans

1 cup

112g carbs

Green peas

1 cup

21g carbs

Carrot (chopped)

1 cup

12g carbs

Butternut squash (chopped)

1 cup

16g carbs

Sweet potato (chopped )

1 cup

27g carbs

Parsnips (sliced)

1 cup

24g carbs

Potato (diced)

1 cup

27g carbs

Pumpkin (chopped)

1 cup

8g carbs

Plantains (sliced)

1 cup

47g carbs

Corn

1 cup

27g carbs

vegetables-high-in-carbs

Low-Carb Vegetables

In comparison to the vegetables high in carbs, you will see the obvious differences in the low carbs. This chart is also based on one-cup servings. It’s easy to say that we are pretty safe eating any of these veggies at any time. and to reiterate, mixing these with a few high-carb veggies is a good and healthy practice.

One of my favorite cookbooks! There are so many great recipes. Delicious and easy to make.

Vegetables Low in Carbs

VegetableServingCarbs Per Serving

Spinach

1 cup

1g carbs

Kale

1 cup

1g carbs

Bok choy

1 cup

2g carbs

Swiss chard

1 cup

1g carbs

Onion

1 cup

15g carbs

Green onion/scallion

1 cup

7g carbs

Leeks

1 cup

12g carbs

Celery

1 cup

12g carbs

Zucchini

1 cup

4g carbs

Eggplant

1 cup

5g carbs

Tomato

1 cup

7g carbs

Green bell pepper

1 cup

7g carbs

Sweet red pepper

1 cup

7g carbs

Cauliflower

1 cup

5g carbs

Okra

1 cup

7g carbs

Asparagus

1 cup

5g carbs

Turnips

1 cup

8g carbs

Radishes

1 cup

4g carbs

Green beans

1 cup

5g carbs

Green cabbage

1 cup

5g carbs

Red cabbage

1 cup

5g carbs

This is the book that can teach you about any vegetable. The recipes are simple to make and you will never be short on new ideas for the dinner table.

In Conclusion

Carbohydrates are essential for our bodies. We need them every day to function normally. However, too much carbohydrate intake can be harmful to our bodies. Therefore, we should eat more vegetables but be mindful as to the amount of high in carbs. Understanding the difference between high-carb vegetables and low carbs will help decide what to eat. This is where we do the math!

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Reginald Thomas

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