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This Will Happen to Your Body If You Eat Ginger Every Day (Plus Recipes)

Born in London, I currently live and work in Accra, Ghana. I am a writer and creative entrepreneur.

The History of Ginger

Fresh ginger

Fresh ginger

Learn More about Ginger

Though its exact origins are unknown, ginger is thought to have originated in Southeast Asia. The plant is a perennial, meaning it can regrow each year, and it prefers warm, humid climates. Ginger is part of the Zingiberaceae family, which includes other popular spices like turmeric and cardamom. The plant grows to about four feet tall and produces yellow-green flowers.

The part of the plant that is used as a spice is the root, which can be dried, candied, or used fresh. Ginger has been used for centuries in cooking and medicine. In ancient China, it was believed to have medicinal properties and was used to treat stomachaches and nausea. It was also a popular ingredient in medieval European dishes, where it was used to add flavor and heat. Today, ginger is widely available and used in cuisines all over the world. It continues to be prized for its unique flavor and health benefits.

The Health Benefits of Eating Ginger

For centuries, ginger has been used as a natural remedy for a variety of ailments. Modern science has begun to validate many of these uses, and there is now a growing body of evidence indicating that ginger may be effective in treating nausea, inflammation, and pain.

Ginger contains a number of compounds that are thought to contribute to its medicinal properties. These include gingerol, which is responsible for the spice’s characteristic flavor, and shogaols, which have been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects.

Additionally, ginger is a rich source of antioxidants, which can help to protect the body against cellular damage. While more research is needed to confirm the full extent of ginger’s health benefits, there is no doubt that this humble root has a lot to offer.

More about Ginger

What Would Happen to Your Body if You Ate Ginger Every Day?

Eating ginger every day can offer a number of health benefits. Ginger has been shown to be effective in treating nausea and pain, and it may also help to reduce inflammation. Additionally, ginger is a rich source of antioxidants, which can help to protect the body against cellular damage. While more research is needed to confirm the full extent of ginger ’s health benefits, there is no doubt that this humble root has a lot to offer.

Is Ginger Good For Weight Loss?

this-will-happen-to-your-body-if-you-eat-ginger-every-day-plus-recipes

There is some evidence to suggest that ginger may help with weight loss. One study found that ginger was effective in reducing body fat in rats. However, more research is needed to confirm these results in humans. Additionally, ginger may help to boost the metabolism and increase satiety, both of which could aid in weight loss.

The side effects of eating too much ginger

Though ginger is generally considered safe, it is possible to consume too much. Eating large amounts of ginger can cause gas, bloating, and heartburn. It may also irritate the digestive system. If you experience any negative side effects after eating ginger, it is best to reduce your intake or avoid the spice altogether.

Ginger Recipes

this-will-happen-to-your-body-if-you-eat-ginger-every-day-plus-recipes

1. Breakfast: Lemon and Ginger Quinoa Porridge

Ingredients:

1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained

2 cups water

1 lemon, zested and juiced

1 inch ginger, peeled and grated

1 tablespoon honey

Scroll to Continue

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground cardamom

pinch of salt

Instructions:

1. In a medium saucepan, bring the quinoa and water to a boil.

2. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes, or until the quinoa is cooked through.

3. Stir in the lemon zest and juice, ginger, honey, cinnamon, card amom, and salt.

4. Cook for 1 minute, or until heated through.

5. Serve with a dollop of yogurt and a sprinkle of chopped nuts.

2. Lunch: Spicy Ginger Carrot Soup

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 pound carrots, peeled and diced

1 inch ginger, peeled and grated

½ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon ground coriander

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

pinch of cayenne pepper

4 cups vegetable broth

salt and black pepper to taste

plain yogurt and chopped cilantro for garnish (optional)

Instructions:

1. In a large pot or Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat.

2. Add the onion and garlic and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.

3. Stir in the carrots, ginger, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, and cayenne pepper and cook for 1 minute.

4. Pour in the vegetable broth and bring to a boil.

5. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes, or until the carrots are very tender.

6. Season with salt and black pepper to taste.

7. Ladle into bowls and garnish with yogurt and cilantro, if desired.

3. Dinner: One-Pot Thai Ginger Rice Noodles

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 red pepper, diced

1 inch ginger, peeled and grated

2 tablespoons red curry paste

1 14-ounce can coconut milk

1 cup chicken or vegetable broth

3 tablespoons fish sauce

2 tablespoons brown sugar

8 ounces rice noodles

1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup frozen peas

½ cup chopped cilantro

lime wedges for garnish (optional)

Instructions:

1. In a large pot or Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat.

2. Add the onion and garlic and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.

3. Stir in the red pepper, ginger, and red curry paste and cook for 1 minute.

4. Pour in the coconut milk, chicken broth, fish sauce, and brown sugar and bring to a boil.

5. Add the rice noodles and shrimp and cook for 3 minutes, or until the shrimp are cooked through.

6. Stir in the frozen peas and cilantro and cook for 1 minute.

7. Serve with lime wedges, if desired.


Final Thoughts

Ginger is a flavorful and healthful addition to any diet. It can be used to add flavor to recipes or consumed on its own. Ginger has many potential health benefits, including aiding in digestion, reducing inflammation, and relieving pain. However, it is also possible to consume too much ginger, which can cause uncomfortable side effects. When consumed in moderation, ginger can be a delicious and nutritious way to improve your health!

Have you ever tried incorporating ginger into your diet? What are some of your favorite recipes that include ginger? Let me know in the comments below!

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