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The Healing Properties of Artic Root

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Lois has over ten years' experience in the home/herbal remedy field. She seeks to inform her readers and help them to save money.

Female arctic root plants

Female arctic root plants

Rhodiola rosea is more commonly known as arctic root. As the name implies, this plant grows in cold climates. While this plant grows in mainly the arctic regions, such as the Russian tundra, it grows in mountainous areas as well. This plant can be found throughout the Alps, Scandinavian countries, Iceland, Asia and even in the higher elevations of North America. It has been used for hundreds of years by individuals living in cold climates to treat a number of health ailments.


Adapgenic Healing Plant

While there are some plants that contain many healing properties, arctic root is one that contains only a few. What is special about this plant and the reason why you should include it with your daily supplements is that the root contains adaptogens. These are excellent for reducing stress. When you are in a stressful situation and let it affect you, it affects your body at the same time. The root cause for many health ailments is stress. For example, you may suffer from high blood pressure because of stress or may have weight issues due to stress eating. Adaptogens help your body adjust to stress, and, while helping you to alleviate it from your mind, rids it from your body as well.

. Your body is already designed to respond to stress. It releases a hormone called cortisone whenever you face stress. That is the reason why you experience the fight or flight response when under stress. Cortisol is excellent if you experience stress once in a while. However, if you have this fight or flight response on a regular basis, the amount of cortisol will continue to rise in your body. When you have large amounts of this hormone, which is also known as the aging hormone, you may notice that you are gaining weight, especially around your belly. One of the main reasons for belly fat is stress and the cortisol that the body releases to fight the stress. The adaptogens found in Arctic root is an excellent tool in weight loss. When you include this root with your daily supplements, you are using the adaptogens of the root rather than your body’s cortisols to fight the stress. You may find after a few weeks that the fat surrounding your belly is reduced.


The male counterpart.

The male counterpart.

Arctic root is used as an anti-depressant. Taking this herb helps stimulate the secretion of serotonin and dopamine. These hormones are what make you feel good, both physically and mentally. When you have an increase of these hormones, the feelings or anxiety and depression are alleviated.

Arctic root increases energy by improving the circulation of blood and oxygen throughout the entire circulation system. This also gives people, especially athletes, more energy and stamina. This also helps if you have a hectic schedule and are feeling fatigued. Arctic root gives you the edge to get through the day. It is also said that taking this root improves the performance of athletes.


Where to Purchase Arctic Root

You can find arctic root products in most health food stores. It is usually sold as:

  • Extracts
  • Powders
  • Roots
  • Capsules
  • Tinctures

It can also be purchased through sites such as Amazon and EBay.

As this plant is named, Arctic root is found in climates where it is colder.  While you might not find this plant locally, you can purchase dried herbs at your local health food store.

As this plant is named, Arctic root is found in climates where it is colder. While you might not find this plant locally, you can purchase dried herbs at your local health food store.

Precautions

The recommended dosage for arctic root is 400 milligrams a day. However, the best way to take this root when starting out is to gradually take it. For the first week, take 100 milligrams a day. Each following week increase the dosage by 100 milligrams until you reach 400 milligrams by the fourth week. Since this root can cause insomnia, take it in the morning after you wake up and approximately a half hour before eating.

Avoid using Arctic root if you are pregnant or nursing.

If you have any auto-immune disease such as multiple sclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis, avoid using arctic root. Since this herb can stimulate the immune system, it might worsen the symptoms of auto-immune diseases.

If you are already taking diabetes medications to lower your blood sugar, do not use Arctic root. It may cause your blood sugar to drop to a dangerously low level. This also applies if you are taking medications to lower your blood pressure.

Always talk to your doctor before using Arctic root before treating any health condition, since this herb may interact with any medications or supplements that you might already be taking.


Sources

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and does not substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, and/or dietary advice from a licensed health professional. Drugs, supplements, and natural remedies may have dangerous side effects. If pregnant or nursing, consult with a qualified provider on an individual basis. Seek immediate help if you are experiencing a medical emergency.

© 2019 Lois Ryan

Comments

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on April 30, 2019:

Good to note.

Eric Dierker from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A. on April 30, 2019:

Lois your writing is excellent. There is a fine friend lady Linda Lum, CarbDiva here. Her fantastic writing skills are based around cooking. You both write with a vigor and love for what we eat. I think you would like to read each other's pieces.

Lois Ryan (author) from Binghamton NY on April 29, 2019:

Thanks everyone. Eric. I can

make a list but I don't have one already online. Just an outline. Maybe I can post the list on Hubpages and update as I go along. I am still learning each day.

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on April 29, 2019:

I am noting all the comments being posted. Thank you.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on April 29, 2019:

This sunds like a great healing plant, but since I have systemic lupus it is not for me unfortunately. Thanks for a good article that explains the properties of Artic Root Lois.

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on April 29, 2019:

Hi, Lois, this medicinal herb is very strange to me. However, my pleasure in reading the article is interesting and tremendous. Thanks for sharing.

Eric Dierker from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A. on April 29, 2019:

Lois is there a place where I can go and get a list of yours on different maladies and connect them to a plant - kind of reverse? You are so refreshing compared rather wrong and droll Internet searches.

Lois Ryan (author) from Binghamton NY on April 29, 2019:

I would say Alaska and possibly Maine. My sister lives there and will have to ask her if she heard of this. She is a doctor and also ran a nursery

Eric Dierker from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A. on April 29, 2019:

I was born at 7,000 feet and played up to 10. I never knew about the name or qualities of this plant(s). Cool Thanks.

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