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The Benefits Of Vitamins A, B1-B12, C, D, E, and K

Kiwi, great source of Vitamin C A Kiwi a day keeps scurvy away?

Kiwi, great source of Vitamin C A Kiwi a day keeps scurvy away?

Malpighia emarginata

Malpighia emarginata

Benefits of Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, D, E and K

Your body needs vitamins to form blood cells, build strong bones, and regulate the nervous system, but it can’t just generate them on its own. Here are the vitamins that every person should be getting and the foods that contain these vitamins.

This article is all about vitamin benefits. It includes information on the benefits of various vitamins such as: vitamin A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, D, E, and K. The article will list various foods containing these vitamins as well as the % Daily Values (DV) that these foods account for.

Scroll down to find detailed information on the vitamins. They are in alphabetical order.

Quick Summary of Benefits

VitaminMain Benefit

A

Vision, Skin regeneration

B1

Energy production

B2

Energy production

B3

Energy production

B5

Energy production

B6

Red blood cell formation

B12

Nervous system function

C

Absorption of iron, Connective tissue formation

D

Strengthens bones and teeth

E

Combats free radicals

K

Blood clotting

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Vitamin A

the-benefits-of-vitamins

Vitamin A

The FDA recommends you get at least 5,000 IU daily

Some foods that contain this vitamin are:

  • 1 oz. Cheddar cheese: 300 IU
  • 1 scrambled egg: 420 IU
  • 1 cup of nonfat milk: 500 IU
  • 1 nectarine: 1000 IU
  • 1 piece of watermelon: 1760 IU

The Benefits of Vitamin A

Vitamin A aids in good vision (we all know this, but what else?) It helps to build and maintain skin! (Here’s an article about how you can avoid damaging your skin in one easy step: Click here)

Vitamin A also helps to build and maintain teeth, bones and mucous membranes.

What you didn't know however, is that vitamin A can also stop the development of breast cancer and increase resistance to infection in children.

Watermelon is also a good source of Vitamin A, for those of us who don't prefer carrots.

Watermelon is also a good source of Vitamin A, for those of us who don't prefer carrots.

Foods That Contain Vitamin A

  • Milk and cheese
  • Eggs
  • Liver
  • Fish oil
  • Lettuce and dark leafy greens
  • Dried apricots
  • Cantaloupe
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Vitamin B1

Some common foods with Vitamin B1

Some common foods with Vitamin B1

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

It is recommended that you get 1.5 milligrams everyday. Here us a little list of some specific foods and how much Vitamin B1 they contain.

  • 1 slice enriched white bread: 0.12 mg
  • 3 oz. fried liver: 0.18 mg
  • 1 cup of black beans 0.43 mg
  • 1 packet of instant oatmeal: 0.53 mg
  • 1 oz. of dry-hull sunflower seeds: 0.65 mg

The Benefits of Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

Vitamin B1 helps to convert carbohydrates into energy. It’s necessary for healthy brain, nerve cells, and heart function.

Foods That Contain Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

  • Whole grains
  • Enriched grain products
  • Beans
  • Meat
  • Liver
  • Nuts

Vitamin B2

Common foods containing Vitamin B2

Common foods containing Vitamin B2

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

For this vitamin, it is recommended that you get a dose of 1.7 mg daily. Here us a little list of some specific foods and how much Vitamin B2 they contain.

  • 1 oz. chicken: 0.2 mg
  • 1 bagel: 0.2 mg
  • 1 cup milk: 0.4 mg
  • 1 cup cooked spinach: 0.42 mg

The Benefits of Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Vitamin B2 helps to convert carbohydrates into energy and it also is essential for growth, production of red blood cells, and healthy skin and eyes. For such an uncommon vitamin, it’s pretty important, especially if you want healthy skin and eyes. Taking supplements of this vitamin however, is not recommended.