Skip to main content

Kick Insomnia to the Curb

An abstract painter and writer who enjoys being with her fur babies, listening to music, and drinking copious amounts of coffee.

kick-insomnia-to-the-curb

For months, I had to deal with insomnia and the frustration it would impose on me. There were nights I didn’t get to sleep at all, and there were nights where I only slept for a couple of hours at a time leaving me feeling exhausted and irritable.

If you’ve been there, then you know what I’m talking about.

Eager to finally put this to rest (see what I did there?), I tried just about every piece of advice I heard in order to help me fall asleep. If you’re going through the same thing, here are a few tips you can use so you can finally get some good quality shut-eye.

Avoid taking naps and late-night caffeine consumption.

It’s tempting to sneak in a little sleep session in the middle of the day when you’re exhausted, I know. Unfortunately, in doing so, you’ll throw off your sleeping pattern even more than it already is.

If you’re a caffeine drinker/consumer, give yourself permission to have your morning coffee or energy drink early on in the day to help keep you awake. Avoid consuming it later on in the day. You don’t want to be wired before attempting to wind down when it’s time to go to bed.

Stay active.

Find something you actually enjoy and stick to it.

Do you like taking walks or running? To avoid getting bored, try finding new routes or invite someone else to go with you! Time really does fly by when you’re having fun, and it helps to have someone else hold you accountable.

Exercise will tire you out, and the more you push your body to be active, the more it will push you to rest at night when it’s time.

Avoid eating a large meal before bed.

Listen to your body. If you’re hungry, it’s okay to eat a small nutritious snack before bed, but make sure you’re not eating in excess and you’re only eating healthy, whole foods.

When you eat a large processed meal, you may experience acid reflux, indigestion, or an overall uncomfortable feeling which can result in a lack of sleep later on.

Take a hot shower or bath close to bedtime.

About an hour or two before bed, you can take a hot shower or bath. The warm water will help you feel more relaxed, and nothing beats that clean feeling you get right after you throw on your night clothes and hop into bed.

Scroll to Continue

You can even crank up the relaxation factor up a notch and use lavender or your favorite essential oils or bath bombs in your bath. If you have a shower, you can use an aromatherapy showerhead steamer, so you can still get the added benefits of essential oils.

Over the counter or natural sleep aids

Melatonin doesn’t work for some people, myself included. There are several options for sleep aids out on the market, and I’ve even found some at the dollar store that work just as well as the ones you’d find at Walgreens or CVS.

Keep in mind, these can take a couple of hours to really kick in so it’s good to plan ahead of time when taking them.

If you’re not a fan of these, CBD and Delta8 gummies have worked wonders for me as well, and sometimes I purchase them for my mother to help her sleep. She absolutely loves them.

Drink an herbal tea.

There are plenty of teas out there on the market with no added caffeine. Lately, I’ve been incorporating tea into my nightly routine, and it works wonders!

I’ve been enjoying peppermint tea because it’s so refreshing and it helps aid in digestion too!

Listen to your body. If you’re hungry, it’s okay to eat a small nutritious snack before bed, but make sure you’re not eating in excess and you’re only eating healthy, whole foods.

Listen to your body. If you’re hungry, it’s okay to eat a small nutritious snack before bed, but make sure you’re not eating in excess and you’re only eating healthy, whole foods.

Be consistent.

Try to go to bed around the same time every day and wake up around the same time every day.

Before I started school, I was working as a transcriptionist/captioner and was able to set my own schedule which meant I didn’t wake up until around 11 am or 12 pm — and that meant I was having a terrible time being able to relax and fall asleep.

After about a week or so of class, I was waking up around 5 am and going to sleep around 11 pm. What a difference that made!

Being consistent will help reset your internal clock, and it’ll be much easier for you to get a good night’s rest.

Conclusion

It all comes down to taking care of yourself and your body. Make sure you’re making time for physical activity in your everyday routine, don’t eat huge meals, and avoid caffeine before bed.

We all need a little bit of help, sometimes. If you find that you’re doing everything within your power, and you still can’t seem to fall asleep, it might be time to have a serious talk with a professional. They can then help you identify the problem and overcome it.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

Related Articles