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Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Monitor

My name is Diabetic Decipher! Here I will share my experience with diabetes and tips and tricks I have learned.

What Is An Insulin Pump?

An insulin pump is a device about the size of a small phone that is capable of delivering insulin for a type 1 diabetic. It needs to be loaded with insulin every 2-3 days along with changing an insertion site of the body every 2-3 days.

Whats the perks of using an insulin pump?

"Insulin pumps help maintain near-normal glucose control with fewer hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) episodes. And pumps often make it easier to reduce A1c levels. An A1c is a measurement of glucose control over a 2-3 month period and the recommended guideline is 7% or below for diabetics. The lower the A1c, the better your chances of avoiding diabetes related complications and living a longer, healthier life," (Lefton, Lee).

To sum up what Lefton was describing here, insulin pumps allow for better control of blood sugar which leads to less complications from diabetes. In the long run, you are better off using an insulin pump than regular injections for health purposes.

To read Lefton's article in its entirety, use the link below!
Article Source written by Lee Lefton: http://EzineArticles.com/7080384

insulin-pump-and-cgm

What Is A CGM?

A CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor) is a device that attaches to the body just under the skin. The device can remain on for up to 10 days before needing replaced. A CGM system allows for better management of blood sugar levels as you are given a reading every 5 minutes without having to use finger pricks.

What are the perks of using a CGM?

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"To maintain lower A1c levels, you have to know where your blood sugar is at all times and react accordingly in order to stay within a normal range. Anyone with diabetes knows that's virtually impossible. But continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) make it a lot easier. A CGM provides continuous "real-time" readings of blood glucose levels. This tells you when your blood sugar is rising or falling so you know whether to take insulin or eat. Alarms warn you when you're going too far in either direction. As a result, you're able to stay within a normal range much more often rather than simply relying on conventional finger sticks. In fact, clinical studies have already shown this to be the case," (Lefton, Lee).

Similar to the benefits of an insulin pump, the CGM allows for better control of a patient's A1C. The common goal we are seeing is that technology in diabetes devices allow for better management of blood sugar which leads to lower A1C levels and less complications.

To read Lefton's article in its entirety, use the link below!
Article Source written by Lee Lefton: http://EzineArticles.com/7080384



insulin-pump-and-cgm

Personal Experience

Personally, I currently use a Tandem (T:Slim) Insulin pump and a Dexcom G6 CGM. Technology has become so advanced with diabetes management that the two devices are actually able to work together! What this means is that my pump can bluetooth to my Dexcom and make decisions on giving me insulin or not. For example, if my Dexcom shows my blood sugar is high, the pump uses this information and gives me insulin without me having to do any input into the pump. This makes the blood sugar management almost completely automated.

The pump can also make a decision on stopping all insulin deliveries. If the Dexcom is showing that my blood sugar is dropping, it does two things. It will first alert me that my blood sugar is dropping and I need to eat carbs or sugar, also my pump uses this information and will stop giving me insulin until I am back in a normal range.

Technology has truly had an amazing impact on type 1 diabetics by making the blood sugar management almost completely automated. The only inputs I need to make are physically adding the insulin to the pump, changing the injection site, and inputing the amount of carbs I am eating. Even though the pump can give insulin based on my blood sugar, it is still important that I input the amount of carbs I am eating. Carbs have a faster effect on blood sugar than insulin does. So if the insulin is given after eating, it will make my blood sugar skyrocket as the insulin hasn't been absorbed yet to bring my blood sugar down.

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