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How Many Hours a Week Should You Actually Exercise Based on Your Age

Introduction

Exercise is an activity that requires someone to put in the physical effort to improve their health and fitness. Exercising is very important because it allows oxygen and nutrients to your tissues. It also helps to improve your muscle strength and boost your endurance. Some examples of exercising include:


  • Walking
  • Jogging/Running
  • Swimming
  • Stretching
  • Biking
how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

How Many Hours Should Kids Ages 3-5 Exercise A Week?

Kids ages three to five should get at least 7 hours of exercise a week. They should get 60 to 120 minute’s worth of activity daily. That can include 20 minutes of light exercise, moderate exercise, and playtime or an hour of each.

How Many Hours Should Children Ages 6-17 Exercise A Week?

Children ages six to seventeen should get 7 to 8 hours of exercise a week. They should get at least 60 minutes of exercise daily. That can mean 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise and 30 minutes of aerobic activity.


how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

How Many Hours Should Adults Ages 18-49 Exercise A Week?

Adults ages eighteen to forty-nine should get 3 to 5 hours of exercise a week. They should get at least 60 minutes of exercise daily. Thirty minutes of moderate-intensity exercise and Thirty minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity.

how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

How Many Hours Should Elders Ages 50 and Older Exercise?

Elders ages fifty and older should get 3 to 4 hours of exercise a week. They should get anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes of exercise daily. That includes 10 or 15 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity and 10 or 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity.

Now you might wonder why people ages 50 and older need to do such little exercise or activity compared to other age groups. That is because as the human body ages, it requires less movement. It’s also very hazardous for older people because they are at risk of injuring themselves during certain activities.

how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

The Benefits and Risk for Children Ages 3-17 Exercising

Exercising at an early age can be very beneficial to a child's development. The benefits of exercising are that it improves cardiorespiratory fitness, builds strong muscles and bones, controls body weight, reduces the symptoms of anxiety and depression, and reduces the risk of developing health conditions.

Too much physical activity can cause harm to our bodies. The risk of too much exercising is overuse injuries, emotional and physical stress, and burnout.

As we all know, exercising can be helpful to our bodies, but what happens if we don't get enough of it or none at all? The risk of not getting enough exercise can cause heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes.

how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

The Benefits and Risk for Adults Ages 18-49 Exercising

The benefits of adults exercising are that it improves blood circulation throughout the body, keeps weight under control, improves blood cholesterol levels, and manages high blood pressure. Exercising also helps prevent bone loss, boosts energy level, releases tension, and increases the ability to fall asleep quickly.

The risk of too much exercising is fatigue or exhaustion (this can be mentally and physically), a weak immune system, inability to recover from workouts, overuse injuries like fractures and tendinitis, tiredness, and depression.

The risk of not getting enough exercise can cause heart problems, obsessive weight gain, and type 2 diabetes. Not getting enough exercise can also cause high blood pressure and cholesterol.

how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

The Benefits and Risk for Elders Ages 50 and Older Exercising

The benefits of elders ages 50 and older exercising are that it prevents diseases, improves overall mental and physical health, and improves balance. Exercising also increases social engagement as well as cognitive function.

The risk of too much exercising is exhaustion, injuries that take longer to heal, developing coronary artery calcification, heart damage, and heart rhythm disorders.

The risk of people age 50 and older not getting enough exercise can cause reduced muscle mass, strength and physical endurance, and reduced coordination. It can also cause reduced balance, flexibility, and mobility.

how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

How to Stay Motivated

I know that exercising and getting fit can sometimes be difficult so, here are some ways to stay motivated:


  • Make it fun by finding physical activities that you enjoy.
  • Take yourself serious
  • Join forces with your friends. It is always better to have support than to do it alone.
  • Reward yourself because you deserve it


Note to Self

If you let people and things get to you, then you will fail. That is why it is significant to stay positive and focus on your end goals. Always remember to do this for yourself, not anyone else.

how-many-hours-a-week-should-you-actually-exercise-based-on-your-age

Citations

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<https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389>.


facebook.com. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://www.facebook.com/cheapsidepreschool/posts/as-restrictions-are-gradually-being-lifted-there-are-more-opportunities-for-gett/3241075499289272>.


cdc.gov. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/children/index.htm>.


aafp.org. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0101/p55.html>.


shapeamerica.org. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://www.shapeamerica.org/standards/guidelines/pa-children-5-12.aspx>.


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<http://web.archive.org/web/20210228094939/https://www.virtua.org/articles/recognize-the-signs-of-over-exercise-in-kids-and-teens>.


cdc.gov. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/factsheets/physical-activity.htm>.


web.archive.org. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<http://web.archive.org/web/20210228094939/https://www.virtua.org/articles/recognize-the-signs-of-over-exercise-in-kids-and-teens>.


depaul.digication.com. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://depaul.digication.com/fitness_unit_plan/Goals1>.


cdc.gov. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/factsheets/physical-activity.htm>.


drochefitness.com. N.p., Web. 21 Jun. 2021.

<https://www.drochefitness.com/older-adult>.







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