Skip to main content

Highly Sensitive People - The 5 Types Of Highly Sensitive Person. Which Are You?

Highly Sensitive People Come in All Shapes and Sizes - Which Are You?

A highly sensitive Introvert

A highly sensitive Introvert

Highly Sensitive People Need Extra Love and Care as Children

Highly Sensitive People

Highly sensitive people are a very intriguing group of people indeed, not only for their extreme sensitivity to almost 'everything' but also for their unique abilities such as heightened intuition, powerful senses and an almost psychic level of empathy with people they interact with.There is no doubt in my mind, highly sensitive people 'do' have a purpose here on this seemingly insensitive planet.


Highly Sensitive People and the Pareto Principle (80/20 Rule)

The numbers that Elaine Aron came up with reminded me of the Pareto principle which states that '80% of the results flow from just 20% of the causes.' According to Dr. Elaine Aron, highly sensitive people make up around 20% of the population of humanity, which definitely gives us something to chew on regarding why only 20% of the population are highly sensitive. The Pareto principle can be applied to many things in life, not only business and profit. Perhaps it can be applied to highly sensitive people? Let's give it a shot:

The Pareto Principle and Highly Sensitive People

80% of all healings that occur are done by the 20% population of Highly sensitive people

80% of all Counselors are made up of the 20% population of Highly sensitive people

80% of all Doctors are made up of the 20% population of highly sensitive people

80% of all people in therapy with counselors are made up of the 20% population of highly sensitive people!

Okay ... okay! I was just speculating as I often like to do but the figures do offer food for thought don't they? Here's what I really think:

I think the reason why highly sensitive people make up only 20% of the population is because if it were much more than that, then our (I'm a HSP too) particular abilities would be redundant and not so 'special.' When you also consider it takes only one highly sensitive person to calm down a room full of not so sensitive people who are arguing or freaking out, or warn a group of impending danger (extra-sensory ability of HSP) the numbers make sense, don't they?


Highly Sensitive People Are Specialists

Just as in any career, e.g. military, law, education, marketing etc, there will always be 'specialists.' Those people who are highly educated in a specific area and whose skills are highly sought after. Funnily enough, they usually make up a much smaller percentage of the workforce than the average worker yet are paramount to the success of the company they represent. This goes for highly sensitive people too! We may only make up 20% of the population BUT our specific set of skills are extremely important to the success of the human race. I won't go into great detail in this article, I just wanted to give you inspiration and hope. Highly sensitive people are specialists! Sounds great... but there are drawbacks to being sensitive.


In Fact I Believe We Are All Specialists!

Above, I mentioned only Highly sensitive people and that may have seemed a little unfair on our less sensitive brethren, who are 'just' as important as the rest of us. The Myers Briggs test is sufficient evidence to show that humanity is filled with groups of 'specialists.' Each type has a specific role in society and the development of mankind and so is an integral part of the natural cycles mankind must inevitably go through. A slight problem though these days, is that highly sensitive people seem to be the least useful members of these specialist groups. You only need go to a HSP forum, online to see the suffering highly sensitive people go through because of the rejection they receive daily. I don't want to get all negative here though so I'm going to say that right now it is the time for 'extroverts' to dominate society and rightly so because that's the kind of world we have built up. However, I predict that the future will bring a time when highly sensitive people are at least 'accepted' and 'welcomed' as an important part of society rather than ignored. The understanding has finally arrived, highly sensitive people are beginning to come to grips with what they are and what is possible for them. The future is bright!

The 5 Types of Highly Sensitive Person

highly-sensitive-people-the-5-types-of-highly-sensitive-person-which-are-you

Misunderstood: HSPs as children.

.

.

.

.

Highly Sensitive People and Stress

Scroll to Continue

.

.

.

.

The book that changed my life

Highly Sensitive People and the 5 Types

I have created a test to help you to find out which of the types of Highly sensitive person you are. I know what you are thinking: there must be far more than just 5 types! Possibly, yes, but I have narrowed it down to 5 just to make things a little more succinct.


The 5 Types of Highly Sensitive Person

Using the diagram of the 5 types above as a reference, take a look at this list and try to figure out which of the types you could be. I have based my calculations on trauma and abuse suffered from childhood to teens as I believe highly sensitive people who grow up in supportive environments where they are nurtured and cared for flourish.

On the other hand, highly sensitive people who suffer from a young age to adulthood develop all kinds of problems, from social phobia to a fear of going outside. Look at the diagram and the list below and then take the test to see which you are.


Type A - A normal highly sensitive person --> Sensitivity Level : 1 (lowest)


Type B - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma in childhood but was supported throughout by a parent or loved one --> Sensitivity Level : 1- 2


Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma in childhood and received little or no support --> Sensitivity Level : 2 - 3


Type D - A HSP who was bullied and abused as a child but received support and protection from parents or loved ones --> Sensitivity Level : 2 - 4


Type E - A HSP who was bullied and abused as a child but received little or no support from parents or loved ones --> Sensitivity Level : 4 - 5 (highest)

Just to be Clear

Hey everyone!

I'm writing this at 03:22 am on 21 Dec 2013 because I see that my classifications are causing a little confusion.

When I mention trauma I'm not necessarily referring to that suffered at the hands of abusive parents, mentally, physically or otherwise. I'm also taking into account the incidences that other children would shrug off and be unaffected by.

Things like being lined up and interrogated to ascertain who stole the cookies can have a much greater effect on a highly sensitive child than on a non-sensitive one.

Growing up in an environment where arguing is frequent, dominant personalities abound and verbal bullying occurs may not affect non-sensitives but it does highly sensitive children, make no mistake about that.

I just wanted to make that clear. Trauma for non-sensitives may be extreme things, but for us (HSPs) constant stress, being left out, loneliness and all those other smaller yet significant things constitute trauma - unless we are supported and understood.


Enjoy the quiz and I hope it teaches you more about yourself.

Richawriter

The 5 Types of Highly Sensitive Person - Find out Which You Are by Taking this Quiz

For each question, choose the best answer for you.

  1. Were you abused and bullied throughout your childhood and teen years?
    • Yes. It continued throughout my entire childhood.
    • Yes, but my parents or loved ones always stuck up for me.
    • No. I wasn't bullied or abused.
    • No. Not enough to cause any mental damage
  2. Were you bullied at school and if so was something done about it?
    • Yes, I was and something was eventually done to stop it.
    • Yes, I was bullied at school but I was also bullied and abused at home. It was hell.
    • No I wasn't bullied.
    • No, I wasn't bullied at school but I was abused at home.
    • Yes, I was bullied but nothing was done about it and I suffered all through my teens.
    • I was bullied and abused both at school and at home, however I did receive help and support to stop it from happening.
  3. Did you grow up with anyone else who was a highly sensitive person?
    • Yes.
    • No. I was alone.
    • Yes, but I didn't realise at the time.
    • Yes, and we supported each other.
    • Yes. Through the tough times we stuck together.
    • No. I had to put up with the pain on my own.
  4. Did you feel alone most of the time, while growing up?
    • Yes
    • No.
    • Sometimes
  5. Do you often find it hard to even leave your home due to fear of people and being overwhelmed?
    • Yes.
    • No.
  6. Did you receive support from your parents and loved ones regarding your high sensitivity while growing up?
    • Yes.
    • No.
  7. Do you experience fear and anxiety when around authority figures or people in power?
    • Yes.
    • No.
  8. All in all, have you learned to live with your trait of high sensitivity?
    • Yes, I'm comfortable now.
    • Yes, pretty much but there are still times when I need to hide away for a day or to to calm down.
    • Yes, I would say that I'm okay in most situations. However, sometimes I get emotional and take things too personally.
    • No. I still can't get used to being a highly sensitive person. I feel weird, like I don't belong.
    • No, I hate being this way. My life is a living hell!
  9. Were you brought up in a close, loving family?
    • Yes.
    • No. My mother and father often fought and argued.
    • No. My mother brought me up as a single parent.
    • No. My whole family was a mess. I was terrified as a child and invisible as a teenager.
    • No. I was abused both mentally and phsyically and received no support from anyone. I was alone.
  10. Did you grow up in an enviroment where you were abused and bullied but supported and protected by a parent or loved one?
    • Yes.
    • No.
  11. Did you grow up in a turbulent enviroment with at least 1 supportive person?
    • Yes.
    • No.
  12. Despite being highly sensitive, are you still quite a confident person?
    • Yes.
    • No.
  13. Would you say that you fit in as well as anyone?
    • Yes.
    • Yes. Even though I experienced severe hardship as a child and teen, I have now recovered and fit into society well.
    • Yes. Thanks to the support I received, I usually fit in well.
    • No. I usually feel out of place, especially in groups of people.
    • I fit in sometimes, but sometimes I feel I just don't belong.
  14. How does it feel to be a HSP?
    • I love being a HSP. It is a blessing.
    • I like being a HSP and realise I have many useful gifts but sometimes it can be hard.
    • When it's good it's amazing! When It's bad it is horrible!
    • I try to accept it but it is hard being sensitive to EVERYTHING!
    • I hate being a highly sensitive person. I'm unable to live a normal life!

Scoring

For each answer you selected, add up the indicated number of points for each of the possible results. Your final result is the possibility with the greatest number of points at the end.

  1. Were you abused and bullied throughout your childhood and teen years?
    • Yes. It continued throughout my entire childhood.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • Yes, but my parents or loved ones always stuck up for me.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. I wasn't bullied or abused.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. Not enough to cause any mental damage
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
  2. Were you bullied at school and if so was something done about it?
    • Yes, I was and something was eventually done to stop it.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • Yes, I was bullied at school but I was also bullied and abused at home. It was hell.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • No I wasn't bullied.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No, I wasn't bullied at school but I was abused at home.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • Yes, I was bullied but nothing was done about it and I suffered all through my teens.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • I was bullied and abused both at school and at home, however I did receive help and support to stop it from happening.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
  3. Did you grow up with anyone else who was a highly sensitive person?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. I was alone.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • Yes, but I didn't realise at the time.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • Yes, and we supported each other.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • Yes. Through the tough times we stuck together.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. I had to put up with the pain on my own.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  4. Did you feel alone most of the time, while growing up?
    • Yes
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • No.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • Sometimes
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  5. Do you often find it hard to even leave your home due to fear of people and being overwhelmed?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +4
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • No.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
  6. Did you receive support from your parents and loved ones regarding your high sensitivity while growing up?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  7. Do you experience fear and anxiety when around authority figures or people in power?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +4
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • No.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +3
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +4
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
  8. All in all, have you learned to live with your trait of high sensitivity?
    • Yes, I'm comfortable now.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • Yes, pretty much but there are still times when I need to hide away for a day or to to calm down.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • Yes, I would say that I'm okay in most situations. However, sometimes I get emotional and take things too personally.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • No. I still can't get used to being a highly sensitive person. I feel weird, like I don't belong.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • No, I hate being this way. My life is a living hell!
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  9. Were you brought up in a close, loving family?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. My mother and father often fought and argued.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. My mother brought me up as a single parent.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. My whole family was a mess. I was terrified as a child and invisible as a teenager.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. I was abused both mentally and phsyically and received no support from anyone. I was alone.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  10. Did you grow up in an enviroment where you were abused and bullied but supported and protected by a parent or loved one?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  11. Did you grow up in a turbulent enviroment with at least 1 supportive person?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  12. Despite being highly sensitive, are you still quite a confident person?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  13. Would you say that you fit in as well as anyone?
    • Yes.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • Yes. Even though I experienced severe hardship as a child and teen, I have now recovered and fit into society well.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • Yes. Thanks to the support I received, I usually fit in well.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • No. I usually feel out of place, especially in groups of people.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
    • I fit in sometimes, but sometimes I feel I just don't belong.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: +5
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5
  14. How does it feel to be a HSP?
    • I love being a HSP. It is a blessing.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: +5
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • I like being a HSP and realise I have many useful gifts but sometimes it can be hard.
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • When it's good it's amazing! When It's bad it is horrible!
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: +5
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • I try to accept it but it is hard being sensitive to EVERYTHING!
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: +5
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: 0
    • I hate being a highly sensitive person. I'm unable to live a normal life!
      • Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.: 0
      • Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.: 0
      • Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.: 0
      • Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.: 0
      • Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.: +5

This table shows the meaning of each possible result:

Type A - The most stable of all HSPs.

You are highly sensitive, and life can be difficult at times but you have learned to deal with and accept what you are. In fact you may have known that you were a HSP from an early age, which helps matters greatly. You do have the odd off-day but in general you like being a highly sensitive person and appreciate the extra-sensory gifts you possess.

Type B - A HSP that experienced mild to medium trauma but received support from at least one parent.

You live in a society dominated by NON-HSPs but because you were supported as a child, you usually manage to fit in quite well. You appreciate your extra-sensory gifts though sometimes you may get the feeling that you don't belong simply because you care so much. On occasion, you become overwhelmed and exhausted by interacting with others and need to retreat to recharge your batteries.

Type C - A HSP who experienced mild to medium trauma and received little to no support.

You are a kind and gentle soul who wants nothing more than to care for and help others. However, you struggle to fit in. You just wish people would sometimes understand you and show you some appreciation for all the effort you make. You may have one of PTSD, Social Anxiety, OCD, ADHD among other disorders and struggle to fit in. You may have also chosen to work from home for the sake of your sanity!

Type D - Abused and bullied, experienced medium to serious trauma but received some support.

Your childhood was a painful one. You were bullied, abused and misunderstood. As an adult or teen, you feel a deep sense of loneliness. No one understands you. You consider your gifts to be more of a weakness and often wish you didn't have them. You do try to fit in though and on occasion, succeed but you soon become overwhelmed and exhausted by interaction with NON-HSPs.

Type E - A HSP who experienced serious trauma as a child and received little to no support from anyone.

You are lonely, sad and feel like you really don't belong here. It's a cruel, cold world and you just wish that people would stop hurting each other. You notice everything, every nuance, every comment, every look and it all hurts. You suffer from depression, social anxiety, PTSD and are afraid to go outside. Home is your haven. You try to fit in and try to build a life for yourself but it's a slow process and you keep falling back into despair.

How Do I Stop Procrastinating - Your Guide to Putting an End to Procrastination

So I'm a Highly Sensitive Person, Now What? - A Survival Guide for Highly Sensitive People

Why am I Sensitive? - A Little Help for Highly Sensitive People.

It's Good to be Sensitive! - 25 Wonderful Aspects of Highly Sensitive People

25 Super Simple Ways to Stop Blushing before it Stops You!

Highly Sensitive People and Social Anxiety - Highly Sensitive People are More at Risk of Social Anxiety

Why do I Blush? - How to Stop Blushing all the Time

3 Tips for Controlling the Subconscious Mind and Taking Control of the Subconscious Mind

Highly Sensitive People - Handle with Care

Why the Quiz?

The reason I made this quiz is simply because I spent my life blaming myself for being weird and weak because I just couldn't cope as well as other people seemed to do. I wondered why I was always so sensitive and seemed to take everything personally. It was much later, when I was 32 that I realised I was a highly sensitive person and I finally had the answers.

Perhaps we aren't necessarily 'types' so much as people who suffered from a lack of knowledge about our trait and therefore suffered in silence, alone and confused. However, I came to the conclusion that if my life was that way 'because' I didn't understand my trait or even know of it then naturally there must be thousands more in a similar struggle.

I concluded that if highly sensitive people 'don't know' that they are highly sensitive while still very young, they will feel strange, alien and alone in an overwhelming world. This will in turn, lead to stress and self-blame followed up with the mistreatment a highly sensitive person might receive due to the lack of understanding about the HSP trait. We may appear to be 'difficult' or 'special' in a negative way to some parents or peers and that will only add to the suffering. Finally, there are also the normal problems of any domestic family life such as fighting, arguing, separations, divorces and child custody battles etc. All this makes for a pretty overwhelmingly negative existence for a highly sensitive person, because of our heightened sensitivity to everything.

Thanks for stopping by and taking the test. I hope I was able to shed some light on the HSP trait.

I will be writing a series about highly sensitive people filled with even more information and tips. Here are the other articles in the series so far:

Are you Highly Sensitive? If not, then do you know any highly sensitive people?

complexity0 on September 03, 2018:

Excellent.

https://hubpages.com/health/anxietyquestions

Bec on January 19, 2018:

haha the results were not really true.. really erred on the pessimistic side - but that was interesting and nice job with the hard work!

Jane Mendelson on October 23, 2016:

First I determined with a professional assessment test, that I had ADD. A sharp, quick, smart child, I always had procrastination issues. My sensitivity as expanded perception or awareness, would have me see, sense, so many possibilities, perspectives, implications etc. attached to an assigned report or research. Repeatedly in grade school my mother sought an a day's extension which oddly were not challenged by teachers even tho we were decades from the concept of non-hyper Attention Deficit and a couple more decades ahead of HSP.

But, since the HSP probably also contributed to my acute perceptions and never omitted creative accents in my submissions, I'd end up with A+ to A++ grades on my work, not penalized for a deadline exception.

The processes at work in the procrastination situation occurred by way of 'Hyper-focusing', where the overwhelming sensory intake overloaded and ultimately flipped a mental switch. Filtering down, what was like an exceptional burst of energy, spun through and, then a stellar outcome.

Perfectionism contributed to the build up of overwhelming sources and information. Apparently, sensitivity, perception, the open mind, had to make sure no angle or relative information was missed or not properly included.

Now I'm pooped. How do I get a copy of this (shouldn't be texting comments that become documents!) Assuming the whole work isn't lost as I try to submit it. Avoiding any physic prediction in those words, I amend, that this submission wI'll work just fine.

Richard J ONeill (author) from Bangkok, Thailand on July 04, 2016:

Thank you Grand Old Lady. What an interesting name you have there! I like it. :)

Thank you for the lovely comment.

There's lots of us, but we're often hard to find because we either learn to hide it, or we live quietly.

Thanks for stopping by.

Richard

Mona Sabalones Gonzalez from Philippines on July 03, 2016:

Such a fantastic article, and I especially liked the test which was spot on. I never knew being sensitive was a mental thing. And it's nice to know there are others like me. I also love the tools you included. I will be reading some of the tools you added. Thank you very much!

denise on January 13, 2016:

I didn't know until relatively recently, in my 60's, that I was normal but a member of a smaller portion of the population; an HSP. This was a couple of years after I found out that I was very introverted, a discovery in which I cried in the realization. No wonder, as a 10 year old, I told myself that I must have been born with something wrong with me and that if no one got close to me, they wouldn't find out either. Now that I understand myself better, I can know that I am really normal and continue to forgive those in my past who hurt me with their name calling. Big relief.

david on August 27, 2015:

Thank you for offering nuance on a subject deserving of it. This co-morbidity of sensitivity and abuse is a dire place to find ones self. Diagnosed rapid cycling bipoalr, medicated with horrible results, five years of intensive therapy and on the home stretch a self loving person who has come to terms with the nature of self and the wounds.

My pill doc would get sarcastic and smirk and be offended when I didn't respond "correctly" to his brain cocktails. Thank god I went cold turkey and focused on therapy.

I may have been bipolar, that's their field, but I'm not anymore. I'm a person of profound sensitivity who overcame the trauma of abuse capable of self love and self acceptance.

Thank you for your attention to this topic.

maggiemay09 on July 04, 2015:

I have to say that the quiz was not well constructed at all. Many of the questions asked either for concrete Yes/No answers, when there should have been the opportunity to say sometimes/often...I think there was one about if I was raiesd in a loving family. The suggesting was that loving families and parents don't fight, which is not the case at all. The result had some truth in it but because of the black & white nature of the quiz it was on the whole pretty misrepresentative.

georgia on April 13, 2015:

Ive accepted im highly sensitive i didn't realise there was so many people who are.glad i found this today.its an overwhelming relief to know you guys are there so thanx

simplykathyh on August 18, 2014:

I just discovered that I am like this, I knew for awhile now something was different about me. But I couldn't explain it to anyone, so I learned to adjust to things. And if it was too much I would go into hiding.

Now at the age of 52 I need to learn how to deal with this. I am sure there are ways to deal with this. And find how I can use my talents to help others.

joanna on August 17, 2014:

Hi, I read this article, nodding at the same time and agreeing with pretty much every comment, article and word that was written. Thank you for sharing.

I am 39, I work as a psychic, intuitive, astrologer and written a book on relationships. I have always struggled to hold down relationships with partners, in fact I started to ask myself, I don't understand men, only for my mum to say, do you prefer women? which made me want to lash out and say to her how dare you...but instead ran away back home, even having the confidence to be harsh back would help but I can't do that...she will never understand me.

My parents are still married after 50 years, they are, what I would call, very black and white, they say it as it is, just get on with it and nothing touches them, literally, they are never and I say never emotional about anything, they don't show it, they don't know how to be but looked after me materially be it financially or did things for me practically, but never got me emotionally. This is my struggle, I just want to feel understood and don't and would rather have less money as they are well off and them emotionally than money, which sounds like Im not grateful but showing love and feeling it are two different things putting aside money. My brother, 41 is nothing like me, he is the same as them so many a times you see me just doing my own thing, reading not engaging in conversation as I sometimes feel its not me or shallow.

Whenever I am around their house now, I don't want to be there anymore, I have recently meditated and its brought up a lot of emotion and feelings, I recently when to a monastery and the same thoughts and feeling emerged for me. So something is shifting. I don't resent my father or mother but do feel at ease knowing I am different and would rather keep conversations light around them now, for some reason that doesn't make me feel lonely anymore just knowing.

When I am working with others I feel confident but the minute I date someone and they reject me and I liked them, I can fall into a very deep depression almost to the point of wanting to contact them again and again and stalking, trust me I don't...but its an overwhelming feeling I have.

So at this age I still feel misunderstood and cant work with any dominant people if I feel their energy is too harsh or bullish same goes for emotionally distant men, even though my mum thinks I am lesbian she will never get me nor will my dad, so its best to keep my distance and just keep conversations short...this seems to prevent me from feeling worse.

The downside is, we are even more sensitive to other's feelings which is a double whammy. I feel alone yes but meeting others the same, like you sai d exercising, eating right and meditating and looking and feeling good, reading books, seems to be the only way forward, trust me it does work..but you have to stick with it and really focus on yourself, even write a diary if this helps as it did me.

I am glad we arent all alone here

anastasia on August 03, 2014: