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A Wild Theory About Germs

Robert Odell, Jr. likes to explore and examine the many mysteries of our world and universe.

did-god-make-germs

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, a germ is a microorganism that causes disease. Most children and even adults consider germs to be icky, nasty, teeny, tiny creatures that no one should ever touch.

So how did germs get here? Did God create those horrendous things, and if so, why?

In Genesis 1:31 of the King James Bible, we read, "And God saw everything that he had made, and, behold, it was very good." Does this mean God considers something that causes disease and death "good?" Surprisingly, "good" germs exist, and humans would have a difficult time living without them. I theorize that, in the beginning, all germs were good.

Most children and even adults consider germs to be icky, nasty, teeny, tiny creatures that no one should ever touch.

Most children and even adults consider germs to be icky, nasty, teeny, tiny creatures that no one should ever touch.

About The Word

The word "germ" is an umbrella term that covers different types of microscopic creatures.

The types of germs include:

  • bacteria
  • viruses
  • fungi, and
  • protozoa.

Germs are so tiny that human eyes can only observe them with the aid of a microscope. They have invaded the bodies of animals and human beings for thousands of years, causing infections, plagues, sickness, and untold loss of life.

Since the time of early Hebrew cleansing rituals, our primary defense against germs has been the washing and cleansing of our hands and bodies.

Since the time of early Hebrew cleansing rituals, our primary defense against germs has been the washing and cleansing of our hands and bodies.

Since the time of early Hebrew cleansing rituals, our primary defense against germs has been the washing and cleansing of our hands and bodies. Those who habitually neglect to take preventive measures make themselves and others they come into contact with vulnerable to attack from germs.

A domain is the largest of all groups in the classification of life. The domain groups include the Archaea domain, the Bacteria domain, and the Eukarya domain.

A domain is the largest of all groups in the classification of life. The domain groups include the Archaea domain, the Bacteria domain, and the Eukarya domain.

Bacteria

A domain is the largest of all groups in the classification of life. The domain groups include the Archaea domain, the Bacteria domain, and the Eukarya domain. One of the three mentioned life domains, Bacteria (bak-TEER-ee-uh), are tiny, single-celled organisms. These creatures get their nutrients from their environment. That environment is primarily a living entity such as an animal or you.

Bacteria (bak-TEER-ee-uh) are tiny, single-celled organisms. These creatures get their nutrients from their environment. That environment is primarily a living entity such as an animal or you.

Bacteria (bak-TEER-ee-uh) are tiny, single-celled organisms. These creatures get their nutrients from their environment. That environment is primarily a living entity such as an animal or you.

Bacteria can be good or bad for humans.

Bad bacteria cause:

  • cavities
  • urinary tract infections
  • ear infections, or
  • strep throat.
Before DNA sequencing, scientists classified bacteria by shape and biochemical properties.

Before DNA sequencing, scientists classified bacteria by shape and biochemical properties.

Research shows that our bodies are full of bacteria. Human bodies harbor as much as three pounds of bacteria. The good news is the majority of the bacteria inside of us is there to keep us healthy. Believe it or not, good bacteria on our skin, in our airways, and our digestive system protect us from problems such as infections. Good bacteria also referred to as probiotics, keep our digestive system in good working order and boost our immune system. Good bacteria is a crucial ingredient in some vaccines and medicines.

Viruses do not have a domain and are therefore outside of the "domains of life."

Viruses do not have a domain and are therefore outside of the "domains of life."

Viruses

Unlike bacteria, viruses do not have a domain. Therefore they do not belong to any of the "domains of life." They are just DNA and RNA shielded by a protein coat called caspid.

Viruses are:

  • Not made out of cells
  • Not able to keep themselves in a stable state
  • Not able to grow
  • Not able to make their energy
  • Able to replicate and adapt to their environment
Cytomegalovirus is a genus of viruses. Order:  Herpesvirales_ Family:  Herpesviridae  Subfamily:  Betaherpesvirinae_ Natural hosts:  Humans and monkeys_ Species in genus:  Eight_   Human betaherpesvirus 5:  Infects humans

Cytomegalovirus is a genus of viruses. Order: Herpesvirales_ Family: Herpesviridae Subfamily: Betaherpesvirinae_ Natural hosts: Humans and monkeys_ Species in genus: Eight_ Human betaherpesvirus 5: Infects humans

Rather than actual living organisms, viruses are more like androids. Some scientists do not see viruses as forms of life and do not consider them alive.

Although they contain Nucleic acid, a complex organic substance present in living cells, and a protein envelope surrounds them, viruses are forms that fail to resemble living cells. The process of replicating DNA in a virus requires the presence of host cells. Therefore, scientists do not see enough of the properties that living organisms possess to place viruses in a kingdom of living organisms.

Much smaller than bacteria, viruses are not complete cells. They are DNA or RNA (genetic material) encased inside of a protein coating. Because they reproduce by using cell structures from other living things, they can not exist unless they live inside a plant, animal, or you. If someone infected with a virus leaves body fluids on a toilet seat or doorknob, the virus will quickly dissipate unless you come into contact with those fluids. Washing your body, especially your hands, will keep infected fluids from entering vulnerable areas such as your mouth or nose.

If someone infected with a virus leaves body fluids on a toilet seat or doorknob, the virus will quickly dissipate unless you come along first.

If someone infected with a virus leaves body fluids on a toilet seat or doorknob, the virus will quickly dissipate unless you come along first.

Once inside your body, viruses spread quickly and easily, causing sickness.

Viruses have caused:

  • colds
  • the flu
  • HIV/AIDS and
  • COVID-19.
Much smaller than bacteria, viruses are not full cells. They are DNA or RNA (genetic material) encased inside of a protein coating.

Much smaller than bacteria, viruses are not full cells. They are DNA or RNA (genetic material) encased inside of a protein coating.

Like protective bacteria (probiotics), we also have helpful viruses in our bodies. Good viruses are called "phages." Also referred to as Bacteriophages, they infect and destroy harmful bacteria. Phages reside in our mucus membrane linings or our digestive, respiratory, and reproductive tracts.

Good viruses are called "phages." Also referred to as Bacteriophages, they infect and destroy harmful bacteria.

Good viruses are called "phages." Also referred to as Bacteriophages, they infect and destroy harmful bacteria.

Mucus, produced by our mucus membranes, is a thick, jelly-like material that sometimes gets caught in our throats. You know, that stuff that cool little boys hawk and spit out. Mucus (phlegm) has a valuable purpose. It contains phages, provides a barrier against harmful bacteria, and shields our underlying cells from infection. Those things contribute to our natural immune system.

Phages, good viruses, have been used to treat:

  • dysentery
  • staph infections
  • salmonella infections
  • skin infections, and
  • antibiotic-resistant infections.
In the classification of life, the domain Eukarya contains the kingdom of fungi.

In the classification of life, the domain Eukarya contains the kingdom of fungi.

Fungi

In the classification of life, the domain Eukarya contains the kingdom of fungi. Fungi (FUN-guy) are multicelled organisms similar to plants. Fungi thrive and grow in warm and damp environments. That warm and wet environment can be a plant, animal, or you.

Fungal infections include athlete's foot and yeast infections. A weak immune system can generate a severe fungal infection.

Fungal infections include athlete's foot and yeast infections. A weak immune system can generate a severe fungal infection.

Fungal infections include athlete's foot and yeast infections. A weak immune system can generate a severe fungal infection.

Studies have shown that our bodies also harbor helpful fungi. According to biologist Dr. Bret S. Stetka, our bodies contain a menagerie of microbes. A growing number of researchers feel that beneficial fungi also inhabit our bodies in addition to good bacteria and viruses. The human "mycobiome" (fungal community) also benefits our health and aids in preventing disease.

There are six kingdoms: Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Protista, Archaea, and Bacteria. Protozoa are in the "kingdom" of Protista.

There are six kingdoms: Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Protista, Archaea, and Bacteria. Protozoa are in the "kingdom" of Protista.

Protozoa

Further examining the classification of life, we find that the domain Eukarya contains the kingdom of Protista. There are six kingdoms: Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Protista, Archaea, and Bacteria. Protozoa are in the "kingdom" of Protista. Protozoa (pro-toe-ZO-uh) are kind of like bacteria but only more substantial in size. They are one-celled organisms that contain a nucleus and other cell structures. Protozoa are similar to plant and animal cells.

Protozoa thrive in moisture. Water contaminated with protozoa is the culprit that spreads diseases and infections of the small intestine such as dysentery.

Protozoa (pro-toe-ZO-uh) are kind of like bacteria but only more substantial in size.

Protozoa (pro-toe-ZO-uh) are kind of like bacteria but only more substantial in size.

Protozoa are also parasites. Parasites survive inside of another living thing, such as a plant, animal, or you. The deadly disease of malaria occurs when protozoa grow inside and destroy red blood cells. Even more alarming is that some protozoa can live a very long time in harsh environments outside of the human body.

As harmful as some protozoa can be, others are helpful. The beneficial protozoa eat harmful bacteria and make excellent food for fish and other animals.

A Wild Theory

Based on the fact that good germs of various types exist and those germs are beneficial to man, I have a wild theory. The first humans on earth lived in the healthiest and most stunning environment imaginable. They had everything they needed, including a fulfilling and long life ahead. However, there was one thing they were instructed not to do. "But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die" Genesis 2:17 (KJV). As the story unfolds, we learn that the first couple, Adam and Eve, ate the forbidden tree's fruit. As a result, the pair caused a microscopic storm to invade their perfect world on that day.

I postulate that at the beginning of man's existence, all germs were good. Adam and Eve's environment was perfectly clean, sanitized, healthy, and free of all harmful bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses.

I postulate that at the beginning of man's existence, all germs were good. Adam and Eve's environment was perfectly clean, sanitized, healthy, and free of all harmful bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses.

I postulate that at the beginning of man's existence, all germs were good. Adam and Eve's environment was immaculate, sanitized, healthy, and free of harmful germs. I think that the millions of good bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa that surrounded and lived within the couple kept them so healthy, fit, and clean that they probably did not have to take baths. Wild idea, right? However, when Adam and Eve disobeyed (sinned) and ate the forbidden tree's fruit, their environment immediately changed. As a result of sin, multitudes of the friendly bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa that God made turned against man. Every since good germs turned bad, man has been experiencing sickness, suffering, and death.

Did King Phillip Come Over For Good Spaghetti?

Did King Phillip Come Over For Good Spaghetti?

Sources

B, A. (2013, August 13). Taxonomic hierarchy. Retrieved from https://scientiaandveritas.wordpress.com/2013/08/13/taxonomic-hierarchy/

Ben-Joseph, E. (Ed.). (2020, March). Germs: Bacteria, Viruses, Fungi, and Protozoa (for Parents) - Nemours KidsHealth. Retrieved from https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/germs.html

Britt, R. (2020, March 27). What the Coronavirus Image You've Seen a Million Times Really Shows. Retrieved from https://elemental.medium.com/what-the-coronavirus-image-youve-seen-a-million-times-really-shows-3d8de7e3eb1f

(n.d.). Retrieved from https://hobart.k12.in.us/ksms/germs/protozoa.htm

Stetka, B. (2016, April 16). The Human Body's Complicated Relationship With Fungi. Retrieved from https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/04/16/474375734/the-human-body-s-complicated-relationship-with-fungus

Yttri, J. (2017, March 28). Bacteria: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Retrieved from http://www.center4research.org/bacteria-good-bad-ugly/

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Robert Odell Jr

Comments

Robert Odell Jr (author) from Memphis, Tennessee on June 22, 2020:

Thank you. I appreciate your comments.

Cheryl E Preston from Roanoke on June 22, 2020:

This is excellent information. Thank you . I learned a lot.

Robert Odell Jr (author) from Memphis, Tennessee on June 04, 2020:

Thank you for reading the article and for examining my "wild theory."

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on June 04, 2020:

I follow your reasoning, and you give your readers the idea of coming up with their own, if they disagree. Good work.

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