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The Dangers of Tabacco Smoking and the Health Benefits of Quitting

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Children who are exposed to second-hand smoke during their first year of life are at a higher risk of illness and sudden unexpected death (SUDI). Almost every organ in your body is harmed by smoking.

Children who are exposed to second-hand smoke during their first year of life are at a higher risk of illness and sudden unexpected death (SUDI). Almost every organ in your body is harmed by smoking.

Tobacco Smoke Contains a Variety of Chemicals That Are Both Harmful to Smokers and Nonsmokers

Even inhaling a small amount of tobacco smoke can be hazardous. At least 250 of the over 7,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke are known to be harmful, including hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, and ammonia. At least 69 of the 250 known harmful chemicals in tobacco smoke can cause cancer. Among the cancer-causing chemicals are the following:

Acetaldehyde, Aromatic amines, Arsenic, Benzene, Beryllium (a toxic metal), 1,3–Butadiene (a hazardous gas), Cadmium (a toxic metal), Chromium (a metallic element), Cumene, Ethylene oxide, Formaldehyde., Nickel (a metallic element), Polonium-210 (a radioactive chemical element), Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), Tobacco-specific nitrosamines and Vinyl chloride.

The second-hand smoke exposure of the nonsmoking mother can also harm the fetus. If a parent continues to smoke during their child's first year of life, the child is more likely to get ear infections,respiratory illnesses like pneumonia & bronchitis.

The second-hand smoke exposure of the nonsmoking mother can also harm the fetus. If a parent continues to smoke during their child's first year of life, the child is more likely to get ear infections,respiratory illnesses like pneumonia & bronchitis.

What are some of the health consequences of cigarette smoking?

In this country, smoking is the leading cause of preventable death. In the United States, cigarette smoking and tobacco smoke exposure causes approximately 480,000 premature deaths each year. Cancer accounts for approximately 36% of those premature deaths, heart disease and stroke account for 39%, and lung disease accounts for 24%. Smokers die at a rate that is roughly three times that of nonsmokers.

Tobacco use harms nearly every bodily organ and organ system in the body, lowering a person's overall health. Smoking causes lung cancer, esophageal cancer, laryngeal cancer, mouth cancer, throat cancer, kidney cancer, bladder cancer, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, stomach cancer, cervix cancer, colon cancer, and rectum cancer, as well as acute myeloid leukemia.

Smoking also causes heart disease, stroke, aortic aneurysm (a balloon-like bulge in a chest artery), diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and cataracts, and worsens asthma symptoms in adults. Smokers are more likely to get pneumonia, tuberculosis, and other airway infections. Furthermore, smoking promotes inflammation and impairs immune function.

Even though the number of cigarettes consumed per smoker has decreased since the 1960s, a smoker's risk of developing lung cancer or COPD has actually increased compared to nonsmokers. The type of lung cancer that smokers develop has also changed over time, with a decrease in squamous cell carcinomas but a dramatic increase in adenocarcinomas. Both of these changes could be attributed to changes in cigarette design and composition, tobacco leaf curing methods, and how deeply smokers inhale cigarette smoke and the toxicants it contains.

Smoking makes it more difficult for a woman to become pregnant. A pregnant smoker is more likely to miscarry, have an ectopic pregnancy, have her baby born prematurely and with abnormally low birth weight, and have her baby born with a cleft lip and/or palate. Smoking during or after pregnancy increases the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in her child. Men who smoke are more likely to develop erectile dysfunction. The longer a smoker smokes, the more likely they are to suffer harm from smoking, including premature death. Smokers, regardless of age, can significantly reduce their risk of disease, including cancer, by quitting.

Relationships require effort. Having a smoking partner can also be difficult for some. Seven out of ten people say they have problems with their partner because they smoke, and 17% of nonsmokers have considered leaving their partners because they smo

Relationships require effort. Having a smoking partner can also be difficult for some. Seven out of ten people say they have problems with their partner because they smoke, and 17% of nonsmokers have considered leaving their partners because they smo

What are the dangers of secondhand tobacco smoke to nonsmokers?

Secondhand smoke is a combination of "sidestream" smoke (the smoke given off by a burning tobacco product) and "mainstream" smoke (the smoke exhaled by a smoker). The United States Environmental Protection Agency, as well as the U.S. The United States' National Toxicology Program Secondhand smoke has been classified as a known human carcinogen (cancer-causing agent) by the Surgeon General and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Adults who do not smoke develop lung cancer after inhaling secondhand smoke. Each year, approximately 7,300 adult nonsmokers die from lung cancer as a result of secondhand smoke exposure in the United States.

According to the Surgeon General of the United States, living with a smoker increases a nonsmoker's chances of developing lung cancer by 20 to 30 percent.
Secondhand smoke causes disease and premature death in adults and children who do not smoke. Secondhand smoke irritates the airways and has an immediate negative impact on the heart and blood vessels. It is thought to increase the risk of heart disease by 25 to 30%. Secondhand smoke is estimated to cause approximately 34,000 deaths from heart disease in the United States each year. Secondhand smoke exposure also increases the risk of stroke by 20 to 30%. Pregnant women who are exposed to secondhand smoke have an increased risk of having a baby, with only a minor reduction in risk.

Secondhand smoke exposes children to an increased risk of SIDS, ear infections, colds, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Secondhand smoke exposure can also worsen the frequency and severity of asthma symptoms in children. Secondhand smoke slows the growth of children's lungs and can cause them to cough, wheeze, and feel out of breath.

A person who smokes their entire life is at a high risk of developing a variety of potentially fatal diseases, including lung, mouth, nose, larynx, tongue, nasal sinus, oesophagus, throat, pancreas, bone marrow (myeloid leukemia), kidney and etc.

A person who smokes their entire life is at a high risk of developing a variety of potentially fatal diseases, including lung, mouth, nose, larynx, tongue, nasal sinus, oesophagus, throat, pancreas, bone marrow (myeloid leukemia), kidney and etc.

Is Smoking a Habit and Addiction?

Smoking is extremely addictive. Nicotine is the primary drug responsible for a person's addiction to tobacco products such as cigarettes. Nicotine addiction to cigarettes and other tobacco products is similar to the addiction caused by drugs such as heroin and cocaine. Nicotine is found naturally in tobacco plants. However, tobacco companies design cigarettes with enough nicotine to create and sustain addiction. The amount of nicotine absorbed by the body is determined by the manner in which a person smokes a tobacco product, as well as the nicotine content and design of the product. Nicotine enters the bloodstream via the mouth and lungs and travels to the brain in a matter of seconds. The amount of nicotine absorbed by the body increases with more frequent and deeper puffs of tobacco smoke.

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Quitting Tobacco

When tobacco users learn about the dangers of smoking, the majority of them want to quit. However, nicotine in tobacco products is highly addictive, and without cessation support, only 4% of users who try to quit smoking will succeed. Professional assistance and proven cessation medications can more than double a tobacco user's chances of quitting successfully.

What are the short term health advantages of quitting smoking?

The following are the immediate health benefits of quitting smoking:
Heart rate and blood pressure, which were abnormally high while smoking, begin to normalize.
Carbon monoxide levels in the blood begin to fall within a few hours. (Carbon monoxide reduces the ability of the blood to carry oxygen.)
People who stop smoking have better circulation, produce less phlegm, and don't cough or wheeze as much after a few weeks.
People can expect significant improvements in lung function within a few months of quitting. People who quit smoking will have lower risks of cancer, heart disease, and other chronic diseases than if they continued to smoke.

Large pictorial or graphic health warnings,as well as plain packaging, with strong messages can persuade smokers to protect the health of nonsmokers by not smoking in the home, increase compliance with smoke-free laws & encourage more people to quit.

Large pictorial or graphic health warnings,as well as plain packaging, with strong messages can persuade smokers to protect the health of nonsmokers by not smoking in the home, increase compliance with smoke-free laws & encourage more people to quit.

What are the long-term health advantages of not smoking?

Data from the United States According to the National Health Interview Survey, people who stop smoking, regardless of age, are less likely to die from smoking-related illnesses than those who continue to smoke. Smokers who quit before the age of 40 have a 90% chance of dying prematurely from smoking-related diseases, while those who quit between the ages of 45 and 54 have a 2/3 chance of dying prematurely. People who quit smoking, regardless of age, have a significant increase in life expectancy when compared to those who continue to smoke.

Furthermore, a study of a large group of people aged 70 and older discovered that even smokers who quit smoking in their 60s had a lower risk of mortality during follow-up than smokers who continued smoking.

Is Quitting Smoking Associated with a Lower Risk of Developing and Dying from Cancer?

Yes. Quitting smoking lowers the risk of developing and dying from cancer and other smoking-related diseases. Although it is never too late to benefit from quitting, those who quit at a younger age benefit the most. Many factors influence the risk of premature death and the likelihood of developing and dying from smoking-related cancer, including the number of years a person has smoked, the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and the age at which the person began smoking.

Quitting smoking improves cancer patients' prognosis. Quitting smoking at the time of diagnosis may reduce the risk of death by 30% to 40% in patients with certain cancers. It improves the body's ability to heal and respond to therapy for those undergoing surgery, chemotherapy, or other treatments. It also reduces the likelihood of pneumonia and respiratory failure. Furthermore, quitting smoking may reduce the risk of cancer recurring, developing second cancer, or dying from cancer or other causes.

Is it dangerous to smoke a few cigarettes per day?

There is no such thing as a safe level of smoking. Even smoking one cigarette a day for a lifetime can result in smoking-related cancers (lung, bladder, and pancreas) and premature death.

Smoking harms your lungs airways and small air sacs. This damage begins soon after a person begins smoking and continues to deteriorate as long as the person smokes. It may take years for the problem to become visible enough to diagnose lung disease.

Smoking harms your lungs airways and small air sacs. This damage begins soon after a person begins smoking and continues to deteriorate as long as the person smokes. It may take years for the problem to become visible enough to diagnose lung disease.

Is it Harmful and Addictive to use other Tobacco Products, such as Smokeless Tobacco or Pipe Tobacco?

Yes. Tobacco in all forms is harmful and addictive. There is no such thing as a safe tobacco product. Other forms of tobacco, in addition to cigarettes, include smokeless tobacco, cigars, pipes, hookahs (waterpipes), bidis, and kreteks.

  1. Tobacco: that does not burn: Tobacco that does not burn is known as smokeless tobacco. Chewing tobacco, oral tobacco, spit or spitting tobacco, dip, chew, snus, dissolvable tobacco, and snuff are all examples. Tobacco use causes oral (mouth, tongue, cheek, and gum), esophageal, and pancreatic cancers, as well as gum and heart disease.
  2. Cigars: These include premium cigars, cigarillos, and little filtered cigars (LFCs). LFCs are similar to cigarettes, but both LFCs and cigarillos may have additional flavors to appeal to youth and young adults. The majority of cigars are made up of a single type of tobacco (air-cured and fermented) and have a tobacco leaf wrapper. According to studies, cigar smoke contains more toxic chemicals than cigarette smoke, despite the fact that, unlike cigarette smoke, cigar smoke is rarely inhaled. Cigarette smoking causes oral cavity, larynx, esophageal, and lung cancer. It may also cause pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, daily cigar smokers, especially those who inhale, are more likely to develop heart disease and other types of lung disease.
  3. Pipes: Tobacco is placed in a bowl that is connected to a stem with a mouthpiece at the other end in pipe smoking. Typically, the smoke is not inhaled. Pipe smoking causes lung cancer and increases the risk of mouth, throat, larynx, and esophageal cancer.
  4. Hookah: also known as a waterpipe, is a device used to smoke tobacco (often heavily flavored) by passing the smoke through a partially filled water bowl before being inhaled by the smoker. Although some people believe hookah smoking is less dangerous and addictive than cigarette smoking, studies show that hookah smoke is at least as toxic as cigarette smoke.
  5. Bidis: A bidi is a flavored cigarette made by rolling tobacco in a dried leaf from India's tendu tree. Bidi use has been linked to heart attacks as well as cancers of the mouth, throat, larynx, esophagus, and lung.
  6. Kreteks: A kretek is a type of cigarette made from tobacco and cloves. Smoking is linked to lung cancer and other lung diseases.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Faith Nacario

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