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Check-in With Yourself (in 2 minutes or less) Using an Emotion Wheel

check-yourself-using-emotion-wheel
check-yourself-using-emotion-wheel

Learning to check in with yourself is one of the best ways to find out how you're really feeling and if something needs your attention.

Have you ever felt the need to take control of your life? Do you often feel like there's a storm inside of you that is constantly brewing and ready to explode?

If so, then this blog post on how to Check-In With Yourself (in 2 Minutes or Less) using an Emotion Wheel.

Learning to check in with yourself is one of the best ways to find out how you're really feeling and if something needs your attention.

Most people don't do this, but it could change everything for them!

Comprehending and describing emotions can be a complicated task. This is because each emotion has many different facets and can be expressed in a variety of ways across cultures, languages, time periods, etc.

What we do know about emotions: they are universal to all people; they usually represent events or conditions that happen around us; they serve as an alarm system for our physical body and mental state.

People with emotional intelligence are able to recognize their own emotions, control them when needed, identify the source of those feelings and how they relate to other people.

Introducing the Emotion Wheel

The Emotion Wheel is a powerful tool for understanding our internal world and it can be used in about two minutes or less!

It's not just an emotion wheel either; it has a visual representation of primary emotions, displaying the varying degrees and complexities of different feelings.

As a tool, it can help people grapple with, accept, understand, and work with their emotions without being overwhelmed.

The wheel is a great management tool for our emotional life because it helps us recognize what we are feeling at the moment or during any particular time of stress or conflict.

It also serves as an awareness aide to help identify emotional triggers that can be avoided in the future.

What is the Emotion Wheel?

The Emotion Wheel is created by a late psychologist, Robert Plutchik. He talks about eight primary emotions: rage, fear, sadness, joy, trust/greed, surprise (anticipation), disgust, and acceptance.

The wheel is a great management tool for our emotional life because it helps us recognize what we are feeling at the moment or during any particular time of stress or conflict.

For example, for the emotion “anger,” the emotions around the wheel are:

  • rage, anger’s intense and uncontrolled form;
  • hostility, an aggressive feeling that can often erupt into anger as a result of frustration or fear of rejection;
  • indignation, outrage at something unjust. Indignation may be less powerful than rage.

    Different colors represent different emotions. They are lighter and darker to show how intense they are.

    Feelings that are next to each other on the wheel often represent responses to similar situations.

    Anger (which is a reaction to frustration or fear of rejection) may be experienced as rage, hostility, and/or indignation--all overwhelmed by anger's intensity. We can use this knowledge about how we experience emotions in order to manage anger emotion.

    The wheel also contains eight dyad combinations of behaviors that are linked to a particular emotion.

    Anger + anticipation: aggressiveness

    Anticipation + joy: optimism

    Joy + trust: love

    Trust + fear: submission

    Fear + surprise: awe

    Surprise + sadness: disapproval

    Sadness + disgust: remorse

    Disgust + anger: contempt

    The wheel is applicable in many contexts, including at-home and work situations as well as for friendships, romantic relationships, etc.

    It can also be useful when teaching kids about emotional intelligence or during therapy sessions with adults.

    What Are the Eight Core Emotions?

    Plutchik says that there are 8 emotions. The wheel of emotions includes anger, anticipation, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, surprise, and trust.

    Each contains different degrees:

    • Anger (opposite of fear): degrees are annoying and make you angry
    • Anticipation (opposite of surprise): Degrees are important and you need to be careful.
    • Disgust (opposite of trust): Degrees make me feel bored and frustrated.
    • Fear (opposite of anger): Degrees are hard and scary.
    • Joy (opposite of sadness): can be serene or ecstatic
    • Sadness (opposite of joy): degrees are worry and sadness.
    • Surprise (opposite of anticipation): Degrees are a distraction and amazement.
    • Trust (opposite of disgust): degrees are like acceptance and admiration.

      How to use the Emotion Wheel

      An emotion wheel is a tool for checking in with yourself. All you have to do is place a finger on the emotion that best describes how you're feeling right now, and keep your finger there for two minutes as it rotates around.

      As soon as you start thinking about something else or want to take your finger off of emotion before the two minutes are up, the wheel identifies your emotions and comes to terms with how you're feeling.

      The Emotion Wheel is a great way to balance work and life and beyond.

      The feeling is a complex process but the emotion wheel promotes great awareness of what is happening in your life.

      The emotion wheel serves as a reminder for self-awareness and personal growth; it's an opportunity to pause, reflect on how you're going through, and change your life for the better.

      I have been using the Emotion Wheel and I am loving it so far!


This content reflects the personal opinions of the author. It is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and should not be substituted for impartial fact or advice in legal, political, or personal matters.

© 2021 Ancel Reyes

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