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Rites of Passage for a Model Railway - 16: Tender Locomotives, From Early 19th Century to 20th

Alan shows you a variety of standard gauge tender locomotives built from early days until the last 9F turned out from Swindon works in 1956

From early days to the 1940s. Fancy scratch-building one of these? (Drawings available from the NRM or 'Head of Steam'*)

S&DR locomotive superintendent Timothy Hackworth's entry for the Rainhill Trials was 'Sans Pareil' (Without Equal). This is the replica in the Locomotion exhibition hall at Shildon - close to the S&DR's line.

S&DR locomotive superintendent Timothy Hackworth's entry for the Rainhill Trials was 'Sans Pareil' (Without Equal). This is the replica in the Locomotion exhibition hall at Shildon - close to the S&DR's line.

'Locomotion', built at the Forth Street works by Robert Stephenson for father George's inaugural run on the S&DR September 25th, 1825

'Locomotion', built at the Forth Street works by Robert Stephenson for father George's inaugural run on the S&DR September 25th, 1825

This is 'Derwent', 'Locomotion' was displayed back-to-back with her at Bank Top Station, Darlington  - until transfer in the 1970s to North Road where regional trains share the premises with the 'Head of Steam' museum in the north of the town

This is 'Derwent', 'Locomotion' was displayed back-to-back with her at Bank Top Station, Darlington - until transfer in the 1970s to North Road where regional trains share the premises with the 'Head of Steam' museum in the north of the town

The backhead (boiler back, and control panel in modern parlance) of 'Derwent'

The backhead (boiler back, and control panel in modern parlance) of 'Derwent'

Furness Railway 0-4-0 inside frame locomotive, like 'Sans Pareil' had no shelter for driver or fireman

Furness Railway 0-4-0 inside frame locomotive, like 'Sans Pareil' had no shelter for driver or fireman

North Eastern Railway - Henry Tennant 2-4-0 Class 1463 of 1895. A fairly quick succession of Locomotive Superintendents dogged the NER in its first 30 years. Stability came soon after with the appointment of Thomas Worsdell

North Eastern Railway - Henry Tennant 2-4-0 Class 1463 of 1895. A fairly quick succession of Locomotive Superintendents dogged the NER in its first 30 years. Stability came soon after with the appointment of Thomas Worsdell

Wilson Worsdell's North eastern Railway Class M1 4-4-0 No.1621 at Locomotion, Shildon

Wilson Worsdell's North eastern Railway Class M1 4-4-0 No.1621 at Locomotion, Shildon

Wilson Worsdell also introduced the NER Class C 0-6-0 for branch passenger and fitted goods workings (for faster running) between towns within the region. These services 'fed' the express workings hauled by engines such as the M1 above

Wilson Worsdell also introduced the NER Class C 0-6-0 for branch passenger and fitted goods workings (for faster running) between towns within the region. These services 'fed' the express workings hauled by engines such as the M1 above

North Eastern Railway Locomotive Superintendent Vincent Raven designed the Class T3 0-8-0 heavy freight locomotive as a successor to his Class T2. They were re-classified Q7 and Q6, although the earlier class outlasted their successors by five years.

North Eastern Railway Locomotive Superintendent Vincent Raven designed the Class T3 0-8-0 heavy freight locomotive as a successor to his Class T2. They were re-classified Q7 and Q6, although the earlier class outlasted their successors by five years.

Nigel Gresley's LNER Class V2 4771 'Green Arrow', named for the express freight service from london to Scotland, built in the mid-1930s

Nigel Gresley's LNER Class V2 4771 'Green Arrow', named for the express freight service from london to Scotland, built in the mid-1930s

Looking upward into the cab roof with dials and controls from the driver's side (Scottish crews refused to touch engines that weren't left-hand drive)

Looking upward into the cab roof with dials and controls from the driver's side (Scottish crews refused to touch engines that weren't left-hand drive)

Inside the cab toward the fireman's side - LNER engines were designed to be driven also by Scottish crews, who refused to handle right-hand-drive (NER) engines. As a consequence English drivers had to be able to handle both left and right-hand drive

Inside the cab toward the fireman's side - LNER engines were designed to be driven also by Scottish crews, who refused to handle right-hand-drive (NER) engines. As a consequence English drivers had to be able to handle both left and right-hand drive