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Types of Citrus

Daisy Mariposa has a B.A. from Montclair University in New Jersey and two occupational certificates from California colleges.

Ellen Levy Finch photographed these orange blossoms and oranges—Citrus sinensis (sweet orange)—on March 23, 2004.

Ellen Levy Finch photographed these orange blossoms and oranges—Citrus sinensis (sweet orange)—on March 23, 2004.

What is citrus?

A genus is a group of biological organisms with shared characteristics. Citrus is a genus of flowering plant in the rue family—Rutaceae.

A species is one level lower than genus in the scientific classification hierarchy. It defines an individual plant by its color, leaf shape, where it is usually grown, or other identifying characteristics.

A cultivar is a cultivated variety of the plant, a naturally-occurring variety or a hybrid which can be reproduced.

The photograph at the top of this article is of the cultivar Citrus sinensis (sweet orange)—a hybrid of Citrus maxima (pomelo) and Citrus reticulata (mandarin).

There are more than 100 members of the genus citrus. A selection of them are described below.

Types of Citrus

CITRUSSCIENTIFIC NAMEKEY FACTS

Bergamot Orange

Citrus bergamia

The bergamot orange is a hybrid of Citrus limetta and Citrus aurantium. It is the size of a orange, but is yellow in color. Bergamot oranges are primarily grown in Italy. They are used for flavoring Earl Grey tea.

Citron / Buddha's Hand / Fingered Citron

Citron: Citrus medica | Buddha's Hand: Citrus medica var. sarcodactylus

The citron is a shrub or small tree with variable-shaped fruit. The pulp is often dry, with very little juice. The thick, soft, and fleshy inner rind is used for flavoring, jam, is pickled, or is candied when boiled with sugar.

Clementine

Citrus clementina

A clementine is a variety of mandarin grown primarly in Algeria, Greece, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, Morocco, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey.

Grapefruit

Citrus paradisi

The grapefruit is a hybrid, a cross between a pomelo—Citrus maxima—and an orange—Citrus sinensis. Its skin is yellow-orange, and its pulp, which is bitter, is white, pink, or red. The trees grow between 16 and 49 feet tall.

Kaffir Lime / Leech Lime

Citrus hystrix

The rind and leaves of kaffir limes, grown primarily in India, Laos, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, are used in cooking. The pulp and juice are too sour to be used.

Kumquat

Citrus japonica

Kumquats are a small fruit resembling an orange. They have a sweet rind and a sour center. The fruit is used for making jellies and preserves and is sometimes candied. A newer use for kumquats is as a replacement for olives in martinis.

Lemon

Citrus limon

Lemons are thought to have originated in China, northern Mynamar (Burma), and Southern India. They are a hybrid between a bitter orange—Citrus aurantium—and a citron—Citrus medica.

Lime

Key Lime: Citrus aurantiifolia | Persian Lime: Citrus latifolia

Limes are used in cooking, especially in Indian, Mexican, Persian, Thai, and Vietnamese food. Lime extracts and essential oils are used in aromatherapy and perfumes.

Mandarin

Citrus reticulata

Mandarins are a variety of orange. There are many varieties of mandarins—hybrids among two or more species—among them clementine, satsuma, and tangerine.

Minneola

Citrus reticulata × Citrus maxima

The minneola is a variety of tangelo—a cross between a Dancy tangerine and a Duncan grapefruit.

Orange

Citrus sinensis (sweet orange)

The orange is a hybrid, a cross between a pomelo—Citrus maxima—and mandarin—Citrus reticulata. The majority of oranges in the world are grown in California, Florida, and Brazil.

Rough Lemon / Bush Lemon

Citrus jambhiri

The rough lemon has a rough lemon yellow skin and a very sour pulp.

Satsuma / Unshiu

Citrus unshiu

The satsuma is a seedless, easy-to-peel species of orange of Japanese origin.

Sweetie / Oroblanco

Citrus grandis (Osbeck) × Citrus paradisi (Macfayden)

A sweetie is a cross between an acidless pomelo and a white grapefruit.

Tangelo

Citrus tangelo

The tangelo is a hybrid of a tangerine and a grapefruit.

Ugli

Citrus reticulata x Citrus paradisi

The Ugli is a hybrid of a grapefruit, an orange, and a tangerine.

Trini Lopez (Trinidad Lopez III): Lemon Tree

A Great Recipe from Dianna Mendez

saying-i-love-you-in-165-languages

Comments

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on April 09, 2015:

Chad (cyoung35),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Living in Southern California, we're fortunate in being able to grow (or purchase) so many types of citrus.

Chad Young from Corona, CA on April 07, 2015:

Great hub, I had a Buddha's Hand citron tree in my back yard and always wondered why the lemons came out with these fingers. Not all of them had these so this is why it was puzzling to me. Now after reading your hub, I know what it was. Thank you! :)

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on March 17, 2014:

John (Jodah),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I don't have any citrus trees growing in my back garden, but I live close to a farmers market which sells locally-grown fruit.

John Hansen from Queensland Australia on March 17, 2014:

Interesting article Daisy. Citrus are probably my favourite fruit especially naval and blood oranges, ruby red or pink grapefruit, tangerines, mandarins and lemons ( not many I don't like). We used to have rough leaf(bush) lemons, mandarins and pomellos growing, but now only have a kaffir lime tree. Voted up.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on March 13, 2014:

Kathi (Fossillady),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thanks, too, for repinning Audrey Hunt's pin. Living in Southern California, I have a wide variety of citrus from which to choose.

Kathi from Saugatuck Michigan on March 13, 2014:

Saw this in Pinterest and had to visit! A lovely reference Audrey! Will come back when I need to know about citrus! Voted+ repinned

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on March 13, 2014:

Chitrangada,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thanks, too, for pinning my Hub.

When I began doing my research for this article, I had no idea there were so many types of citrus. Leaning that there were more 100 types surprised me very much.

Chitrangada Sharan from New Delhi, India on March 13, 2014:

This is loaded with interesting information about Citrus and its various types. Never knew, there were so many of them. Wonderful pictures and video too.

Voted up and pinning!

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on March 12, 2014:

Dianna (teaches12345),

Thanks for visiting again. The Buddha's Hand citrus would be perfect for your orange-chocolate dipped treat.

I would love to grow a Buddha's Hand in my back garden. They grow in zone 10, the zone in which I live. I would have to find a California nursery selling the tree. The agricultural laws in California prohibit the tree from being brought in from another state.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on March 12, 2014:

Audrey (vocalcoach),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thanks, too, for pinning, tweeting, and sharing my Hub.

Are you near any Sprouts (formerly Henry's) farmers markets? That's where you'll have the possibility of finding the Buddha's Hand citrus.

Dianna Mendez on March 12, 2014:

I'm back again for the support, but also to say I'm going to try the Buddha's hand with the orange-chocolate dipped recipe some day. I like the fact that it is easy to prepare.

Audrey Hunt from Idyllwild Ca. on March 12, 2014:

Hi Daisy ~ I just can't picture heavy grapefruit growing on a tree. But, silly me, how else would they grow? I found the 'Buddha's Hand' both interesting and beautiful. Thanks for introducing this to me along with the gorgeous photo. I'm going to have to try this citrus fruit.

So glad you brought this hub back as I missed it the first time. Informative, interesting and great presentation. Pinning, tweeting and sharing. Thanks, Daisy.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on January 07, 2014:

Dianna (teaches12345),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. The Buddha's Hand is basically citrus rind...no juice or pulp. It's perfect for boiling with sugar and then dipping in chocolate. Your recipe is perfect for this type of citrus.

Dianna Mendez on January 07, 2014:

I love citrus and try to drink a glass of water every day with a lemon slice inside. I didn't realize there were so many different types. The Buddha's hand looks quite strange, but I'm sure it is still good.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on September 05, 2013:

Jen (jenbeach21),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Every time I shop in my neighborhood farmers market, I'm more aware of the types of citrus they sell.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on September 05, 2013:

Nihat,

It's nice to "hear" from you. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub.

The photographs are from Wikimedia Commons. It's my primary source for images when I don't use my own photographs.

California is a great state for growing citrus. I live in aptly-named Orange County. Citrus is grown everywhere. We currently are not growing any ourselves, but our next-door neighbors have some beautiful lemon trees in their backyard.

jenbeach21 from Orlando, FL on September 04, 2013:

Great information! I love anything orange and lemon flavored and now I feel more knowledgeable about the fruits!

Nihat İyriboz on July 23, 2013:

Hi Daisy,

I enjoy this article and photographs very much. I find it fascinating as I practically grew up at a citrus orchard. We harvest satsuma, clementine, grapefruit, lemon, orange. I'll forward this. Thank you for sharing!

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on June 24, 2013:

Anne (bac2basics),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate your including your personal anecdote and your giving us insight into the orange growing industry in Spain.

Anne from Spain on June 24, 2013:

Hi Daisy.

Living in Valencia Spain just inland from Costa de Azahar ( orange blossom coast) This hub really caught my interest. I had no idea that there were so many different types of citrus.

I love the oranges which are grown all around where I live and every year a very kind family from the village drops me off a crate full of their own oranges, far too many for me to eat so I share them amongst friends. The Valencia orange is wonderful but I also am given a huge amount of what we would call in the UK Jaffa or navel oranges, they are to die for, sweet juicy and pip less.

Unfortunately the farmers don´t reap much financial reward from all their hard work these days and I remember a couple of years ago they were actually not even bothering to take their fruit to market as it wasn´t worth the effort for the price they were being offered. Many fruit growers are now switching to more exotic fruits in an attempt to corner the market, who can blame them. However there are still thousands of acres of orange groves in the region and so the area will remain the coast of orange blossom.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on June 23, 2013:

Carly,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub. There are a number of varieties of orange. Which one is your favorite?

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on June 23, 2013:

Mary (mary615),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub.

I live in Orange County, California and am able to buy many varieties of locally-grown citrus at the farmers' market in my neighborhood. I had no idea how many types of citrus there were until I began doing the research for my article.

Carly Sullens from St. Louis, Missouri on June 23, 2013:

Great detailed hub!! I think my favorite citrus fruit, or favorite fruit of all time is the orange. If I had to eat only one fruit for the rest of my life, I would pick the orange. I love oranges and citrus fruit around the holidays.

Now that I live in the south I can see how beautiful citrus plants and trees are. We are trying to grow an orange tree as a family. Our oranges are so small and tart now. Hopefully, with time they will grow in flavor and size. Voted up and shared.

Mary Hyatt from Florida on June 23, 2013:

I had no idea there were this many types of Citrus. I live in S. Florida where we grow lots of oranges and grapefruit.

You wrote a very interesting and informative article here.

Voted UP and will share.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on June 19, 2013:

Bobbi,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment.

I live in Southern California, in the southern half of Orange County. I'm fortunate in being able to purchase locally-grown citrus at very reasonable prices. After doing the research for my article, I'm much more aware of the different varieties of oranges I see in my neighborhood farmers' market.

Barbara Purvis Hunter from Florida on June 19, 2013:

Hi,

Your hub gave us a lot of great information. My Great Uncle had an orange grove and I learned so much from him.

Thanks for sharing this with us and I am happy I am online tonight to visit.

Bobbi Purvis

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on February 28, 2013:

Michelle (midget38),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub. I'm able to buy many varieties of citrus grown locally, but I don't think I have a favorite.

Michelle Liew from Singapore on February 28, 2013:

Excellent photographs and I love my citrus. My favorite is grapefruit. Passing this round.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on January 16, 2013:

Devika (DDE),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article, viewing the photographs, and commenting. I don't think anyone who has read this article had realized that there were more than 100 types of citrus. The fact seems to have surprised everyone.

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on January 16, 2013:

Incredible kinds of citrus never knew there were such different kinds you have once more improved my knowledge thanks

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on January 15, 2013:

Bake Like a Pro,

Thanks for visiting again. For the types of articles I publish, Wikimedia Commons is the best source I've found for legally-attributable photographs when I don't have photos of my own to use.

Bake Like a Pro on January 15, 2013:

I love how I learn something new every time I visit Hub Pages. Just from your response to my comment I learned about Wikimedia Commons!!! Thank you :)

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on January 15, 2013:

Bake Like a Pro,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. I had no idea there were more than 100 varieties of citrus until I began doing the research for my article.

I'm glad you liked the photographs. I found all of them on Wikimedia Commons.

Bake Like a Pro on January 15, 2013:

Great article and beautiful photos. I can just smell those citrus flowers by looking at these photos. Who knew citrus had such variety. I especially liked the Buddha's Hand citron. Thank you for this detailed and informative hub. Voted up and sharing :)

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on January 14, 2013:

Riviera Rose,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article, viewing the photographs, and commenting. I try to write articles which are gently educational. I'm glad you learned something from reading my Hub.

Riviera Rose from South of France on January 14, 2013:

I'd never seen kaffir limes before, so I've learnt something new today. I'm lucky enough to have mandarin, lemon, lime (the regular kind) and kumquat trees on my terrace. I also hadn't realised there were different types of kumquats, mine are the small oval ones - they make great jam! Voted up and beautiful!

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on January 07, 2013:

Samantha / Susan (Vacation Trip),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate it.

Susan from India on January 06, 2013:

Very good article, good information and well written :)

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on January 06, 2013:

Linda (Sunshine625),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I had no idea there were so many types of citrus until I began doing the research for my article. The Buddha's Hand citron is the most usual example I discovered.

I see lots of varieties of citrus in the farmers' market in my neighborhood, but we usually just buy sweet oranges in the market.

Linda Bilyeu from Orlando, FL on January 06, 2013:

Now that's a lot of citrus! The Buddha's hand is quite unique. Well done hub. Makes me want a glass of O.J.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 21, 2012:

Vinaya,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Which types of citrus are you growing in your garden?

I had no idea there were more than 100 varieties of citrus until I began doing the research for my Hub. This week, I saw a number of varieties of mandarins in the farmers' market in my neighborhood. I also saw pomelos in the farmers' market and a specialty grocery store.

I've never seen the Buddha's Hand citron, and I had never heard of it until this week. I'd like to know more about it. I think I'll do some further research when I get a chance.

Vinaya Ghimire from Nepal on December 21, 2012:

Daisy,

Even though I have six types of citrus fruits in my garden,I did not know much about the varieties you have shared here.

I had never seen The Buddha's Hand.

What a fantastic hub.

Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 20, 2012:

Aurelio (alocsin),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. The Buddha's Hand citron can probably only be found in a specialty grocery store.

Pomelos are in season now. I saw them twice in Orange County this week...in Trader Joe's and in Sprouts.

Aurelio Locsin from Orange County, CA on December 20, 2012:

Wow, I've never heard of Buddha's hand, let alone seen or tasted one. I'll see if I can find it in my local area. Voting this Up and Useful.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 18, 2012:

vibesites,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. Even with oranges, there are many varieties.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 18, 2012:

Mary (tillsontitan),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting, Thanks, too, for your very kind words. I appreciate your support of my writing.

I enjoy writing articles which are "gently educational." I almost always use Wikimedia Commons for my photographs if I don't have ones of my own I can use. It takes a lot of time to find and properly attribute the images, but I think the time is well-spent.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 18, 2012:

Glimmer Twin Fan,

Thanks for stopping by again. Thanks, too, for pinning my article.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 18, 2012:

Nithya (Vellur),

Thanks for reading my article, viewing the photographs, and commenting. The Buddha's Hand citron is so unusual-looking, I don't think I would even want to touch one if I were to see it in a market.

vibesites from United States on December 18, 2012:

Good work on this, Daisy! Now I learn something new about other citrus fruits, beyond oranges, lemons and limes. Voted up and interesting.

Mary Craig from New York on December 18, 2012:

You are a female wikipedia! Great job Daisy. So much good information and so diverse. Your research is impeccable and your photos, as always, fit in and add to the great hub!

Voted up, useful, and interesting.

Claudia Mitchell on December 18, 2012:

Hi Daisy - For some reason the buttons were not popping up last night (weird, because I scrolled up and down a couple of times), but they are there now and I have pinned.

Nithya Venkat from Dubai on December 18, 2012:

Great information on types of citrus. The Buddha hand looks amazing. I love oranges and lemon, so refreshing to drink!! Voted up.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Rich (rcrumple),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I appreciate your suport of my writing.

You're not late, my friend. I published this Hub less than 24 hours ago.

There's a farmers' market in my neighborhood. I'll be going there tomorrow. I'm going to see how many varieties of citrus the market is currently selling.

Rich from Kentucky on December 17, 2012:

Daisy - Sorry I'm late. Still trying to catch up. Really a great hub on all the different citrus offerings. I wish we had the availability of many of these in the Midwest. We seem to get the basics and that's about it. Great job!

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Rajan,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article, viewing the photographs, and commenting.

I enjoy writing articles which are "gently educational." I learned quite a bit myself while doing the research for this Hub.

My first choice for images for my articles, Wikimedia Commons, didn't let me down. I found so many terrific photographs of citrus which people from all over the world contributed to the site.

Rajan Singh Jolly from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on December 17, 2012:

There is an amazing variety in the Citrus species. Lovely pictures, Daisy.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Glimmer Twin Fan,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. It surprised me to learn there were more than 100 varieties of citrus. I'll have to look more carefully at the descriptions the next time I'm in my neighborhood farmers' market. I'd like to try something "new."

The like, tweet, and pin buttons are in the top right corner of the article. They sometimes appear after you scroll down the page a bit.

Claudia Mitchell on December 17, 2012:

This is fascinating. I love citrus, but had no idea of all the different varieties! I always thought I was being exotic when I ate blood oranges. Love all of your photos. Was going to pin, but don't see the pin button on the hub.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Nell,

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. I had no idea there were more than 100 types of citrus until I began doing the research for my Hub.

It must be rather dreary and winter-like in the UK now. Your countryman Mohan Kumar also commented about the bright colors of the fruit.

I'm fortunate in that I live in Orange County in Southern California. We have many varieties of locally-grown fruit in our neighborhood farmers' market.

The Buddha's Hand citron gets my vote for the #1 strangest-looking fruit of all time.

Nell Rose from England on December 17, 2012:

I never realised that there were so many different citrus, so this was fascinating and lovely to read, all that color bring back the spring! lol! love some of the names like buddhas hand, great hub and voted up! nell

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Ruchira,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I had no idea there were more than 100 types of citrus until I began doing the research for my Hub.

I'm glad you like the song. "Lemon Tree" has been recorded by many artists.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

amyxal (tattuwurn),

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Marlene,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment.

I know exactly what you mean about the leech lime. I can imagine how it got its name.

The photographs are all from Wikimedia Commons. It's the best source I've found for images for the types of articles I publish when I don't have photos of my own.

Ruchira from United States on December 17, 2012:

Great information, Daisy.

I loved the song...so appropriate ;)

Marlene Bertrand from USA on December 17, 2012:

Oh, that leech lime looks scary! It must be the day of the citrus fruits for me. My neighbor just gave me some kumquats and my husband just plucked three lemons and a navel orange off our tree. Now, I'm reading your interesting hub about citrus. I really enjoyed reading and viewing all the photos.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Julie (Jools99),

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I appreciate your support of my writing.

The kumquat had been classified as being in other than the citrus genus for many years. Several years ago, it was reclassified as Citrus japonica.

Buddha's Hand citron isn't *one of* the most unusual fruits I have ever seen. It's *the* most unusual...That's why I placed its photo first in the queue.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Joelle (kidscrafts),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article, viewing the photographs, and commenting.

The Buddha's Hand citron is the most unusual fruit I have ever seen...in a photograph. I would imagine they are only sold in specialty / gourmet grocery stores.

I've seen pomelo trees in Tahiti. The trees are very tall, and the fruit is huge.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Aldene (AMFredenburg),

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. Thanks for sharing and tweeting it, too. I appreciate your support.

Jools Hogg from North-East UK on December 17, 2012:

Daisy, interesting hub. I did not realise Kumquat was a citrus. Very comprehensive hub. The Buddha's Hand citrus is one of the strangest fruits I have ever seen.

kidscrafts from Ottawa, Canada on December 17, 2012:

I was quite impressed by the Buddha's Hand citron. I never heard of it before.... so I learned again something new today :-) It looks quite strange compare to the other citrus fruit that we see in the stores.

My favorite citrus fruit since I am a child is the blood orange!

I love all your pictures! My favorite one is the flowers of limes growing in Haifa!

Voted up, interesting and beautiful!

Aldene Fredenburg from Southwestern New Hampshire on December 17, 2012:

Interesting info, and great photos! Tweeted, voted up, and shared. Thanks!

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Mohan (Docmo),

Thanks for taking a break from writing the medical textbook to read my latest article and adding your comment. I appreciate your continuous support of my writing.

Thanks, too, for providing me with the Tamil translation of the description accompanying the Indian lemon photograph I found. All of the photographs are from Wikimedia Commons. That site seems to be the best source for images for the types of articles I publish.

Mohan Kumar from UK on December 17, 2012:

A fabulous discourse on the types of citrus fruits ( citrii?) I love the bright beautiful pictures in here and the well tabulated list of varieties. Well done , once again - a great resource!

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

thumbi7,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article, viewing the pictures, and commenting.

All of the photographs are from Wikimedia Commons. I find it's the best source for images for the articles I write.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

MsDora,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I learned a lot from doing the research for this Hub.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

Alecia,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for sharing it on Twitter.

I was also surprised to see that citrus was so diverse, and that there were so many hybrids. The fact that both oranges and grapefruits were hybrids surprised me.

Daisy Mariposa (author) from Orange County (Southern California) on December 17, 2012:

LetitiaFT,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. Thanks, too, for being the first person to comment, and for sharing my Hub.

Not all of the more than 100 varieties of citrus are grown in abundance, and many of them are only available in limited geographical areas.

JR Krishna from India on December 17, 2012:

Wow! These pictures are wonderful!

I feel refereshed just by looking at them

Thanks for sharing..

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on December 17, 2012:

I find the facts on the hybrids especially interesting. Never thought the orange belonged there. Thanks for all this wonderful information. Voted Up and More.

Alecia Murphy from Wilmington, North Carolina on December 17, 2012:

I didn't know citrus was this diverse. Even more so, I was surprised to learn that grapefruit's a hybrid. Thanks for this information Daisy, it definitely comes in handy now during cold and flu season!

LetitiaFT from Paris via California on December 17, 2012:

Isn't all of that abundance amazing? And we use so very few of those varieties. I discovered the Menton lemon only last year, a variety with a very unique chemical make up that is sought out by French chefs and is indeed exquisite. At one time Menton was Europe's major exporter of citrus, these lemons in particular, but now they are hard to come by, the warm microclimate having been developed as a French Riviera resort town. So it goes. Voted up and shared.

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