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Traditional Indian Dry Sweet For Festivals: Thekua or Khajur Recipe

Chitrangada has nutrition in mind when cooking for her family. Making tasty nutritious food is a skill she has perfected over the years.

Thekua in Bihar, Khajur in Uttar Pradesh— Traditional Indian Recipe

Thekua in Bihar, Khajur in Uttar Pradesh— Traditional Indian Recipe

Thekua—Passing on the Traditional Recipes to the Next Generation

The traditional recipes of India are rich in flavour, and a delight to all the senses.
The traditional Indian food is influenced by many factors, such as the seasons, culture and region, to which they belong. In other words, the food and spices which grow, in that particular region of India, are included as ingredients in the delicious recipes.

The food choices also keep on changing, according to the seasons. So, you have those agricultural products and thus recipes in winter season, which keep you warm, and protect you from winter related health issues. Similarly, in summer season, you have agricultural produce and recipes, which keep you cool, and protect you from summer related health issues.

There are so many rich sweets and snacks, prepared on specific festivals and special occasions, which we have seen our mothers, and grandmothers preparing, with so much love and passion. It’s important to maintain the traditions and also pass it on to the next generations.

Thekua or Khasta Khajur:

Thekua is a centuries old, dry and sweet snack, which is prepared on festivals like, Teej puja, Chath puja, Vat Savitri Puja, weddings and special occasions in the Northern states of India, such as Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and others.
Thekua is also known as, Khajuria, Khasta Khajur, Thikari and some other names.
The main ingredients used to prepare Thekua is, whole wheat flour, sugar or jaggery, pure ghee (clarified butter), dry coconut, fennel seed. Some people combine other flours, like rice flour, maida (self raising flour), semolina etc. But, traditionally the Thekua is made of wheat flour, and it tastes best with this.

Simple ingredients for the Thekua recipe— Whole wheat flour, sugar, ghee or refined or vegetable oil, fennel seeds, dry chopped coconut, thekua mould

Simple ingredients for the Thekua recipe— Whole wheat flour, sugar, ghee or refined or vegetable oil, fennel seeds, dry chopped coconut, thekua mould

The prepared dough for Thekua or Khajur recipe

The prepared dough for Thekua or Khajur recipe

Use a Thekua mould to shape them

Use a Thekua mould to shape them

Fry the Thekuas on low to medium heat

Fry the Thekuas on low to medium heat

The prepared Thekuas can be stored in containers, as a dry snack/ sweet for a long time. Easy to use in travels and picnics too

The prepared Thekuas can be stored in containers, as a dry snack/ sweet for a long time. Easy to use in travels and picnics too

Preparation time and cooking time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

30 min

20 min

50 min

Five people

Ingredients for Thekua or Khajur recipe

  • 500 gm or 2 cups wheat flour
  • 200 gm or 1 cup sugar
  • 500 litre refined oil or pure ghee
  • 1 tablespoonful saunf or fennel seeds
  • 2 tablespoons chopped dry coconut
  • 2 cups water for kneading

Instructions for making Thekua: Preparing the dough, and then frying

  1. Take the whole wheat flour in a big kneading bowl. Add sugar, saunf (fennel seeds), chopped dry coconut, and some ghee or refined oil.
  2. Mix the mixture thoroughly, till it resembles breadcrumbs. Another method is to press the mixed mixture in your fist. It should be firm and solid, and not scatter or crumble.
  3. Slowly add water to make the dough. The dough must be firm and not soft. Keep it covered with a muslin cloth for 10 to 15 minutes.
  4. Make equal size balls and press the balls flat on the Thekua mould, which is easily available in the markets. If you don’t have it, you can flatten the balls and lightly press them with a fork, as it’s done in cookie. Make some design with fork, and keep the thickness, as you will in a cookie.
  5. Heat sufficient oil for deep frying. The oil should be heated first, and then the heat should be reduced to low. Fry the Thekuas on low to medium heat, but never on high heat, for even frying both from inside and outside.
  6. You can fry around four of them in one batch. When one side is cooked, turn the Thekuas to cook the other side.
  7. Take the fried Thekuas out, once they turn golden brown. Let them cool completely, before storing them in air tight containers.
Thekua or Khasta Khajur for Chath Puja

Thekua or Khasta Khajur for Chath Puja

Some Tips To Make The Best Thekuas

  • The dough should be firm, neither hard nor soft.
  • Water should be added gradually, and not all at once.
  • Rest the prepared dough, for at least fifteen minutes, before frying.
  • Fry on low to medium heat, and not on high heat. Otherwise, the Thekua will remain uncooked from inside, even if they look golden brown on the outside.
  • Do not keep turning the Thekua, while it’s cooking. When one side is done, gently turn to the other side, with a wooden spatula.
  • Before storing in a jar, let the Thekua cool completely.
  • The Thekua can be stored in an airtight container, for a long time. There is no need to add preservatives for this purpose. They retain their crispness, if stored properly, as mentioned above.
  • Thekua is quite convenient to carry on a vacation or journey, road trips, and even as homemade snacks.
  • You can reduce or increase the amount of sugar, according to your taste, and even use ‘sugar free’ instead of sugar.
  • If you are using jaggery, instead of sugar, soak and dissolve it in that much water, which is required for kneading the dough.
  • Traditional recipes, especially when they are being prepared for puja (offerings) purposes, should be made with purity, patience, precision, and devotion. That makes them extremely pious, a blessing and a joyful experience to enjoy with family.

Thekua recipe, source: YouTube

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Chitrangada Sharan

Comments

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 23, 2021:

Helko Devika!

So pleased to know that you liked this recipe. Appreciate your kind words of appreciation.

Many thanks for reading and commenting. Have a wonderful weekend

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on October 22, 2021:

ChitrangadaSharan Your recipe sounds delicious. I like to add Indian spices in my meals it is tasty and unique. This recipe is one of my favourites.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Audrey!

It’s always a pleasure to read your positive comments on my work. Hope you are doing well.

Your comments made me smile, and I would be happy, if you try this traditional Indian recipe, this weekend.

Many thanks for your kind words of appreciation. Have a blessed day.

Audrey Hunt from Pahrump NV on October 21, 2021:

This recipe sounds yummy. I love experimenting with new ingredients. THis weekend you will find me in the kitchen trying your recipe. THank you for sharing.

BLessings to you.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Brenda!

Thanks for reading and appreciating the article. You may skip the coconut, if you want.

Always a pleasure to read your comments.

Thank you so much. Hope all is well at your end.

BRENDA ARLEDGE from Washington Court House on October 21, 2021:

I'm not one for coconut, but I try it if it was here in front of me.

It looks delicious.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello FlourishAnyway!

Appreciate you for taking the time to read and comment. I am pleased to know that you liked this authentic Indian recipe, prepared on festivals and special occasions.

Have a good day. Thank you so much for your support.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Kalpana!

Your comments made me smile. Yes, there are so many, so many delicious Indian recipes, to try. I love the diversity, and keep on learning about them.

Always a pleasure to read your positive comments.

Thank you for reading and appreciating. Have a good day.

FlourishAnyway from USA on October 21, 2021:

Thanks for sharing your recipe and culture. They look beautiful pressed out on that mould with the pattern, made with your loving hands.

Kalpana Iyer from India on October 21, 2021:

Looks delicious! I have never had thekuas before. When you think you know all the Indian recipes out there, the internet surprises you with another new one. So many dishes, so many to try, only one mouth :) Indian cuisine is remarkably diverse.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Thank you MG Singh Ji, for reading and commenting.

Much appreciated.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Andrew!

It’s always good to read your thoughts about my work, and especially about India.

Yes, traditional way of cooking these dry sweet, is to fry them, and not baked. The taste is heavenly, as I have mentioned above, that they are used for offerings, for special festivals. I don’t know, how they will turn out, if they are baked.

They go well with tea or coffee, just as the cookies.

Thank you for taking the time to read and comment. Much appreciated.

Have a wonderful day.

MG Singh emge from Singapore on October 21, 2021:

Very interesting. I love sweets.

Andrew Spacey from Near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire,UK on October 21, 2021:

Always a pleasure to learn about the exotic Indian way of cooking, thank you. As I was reading through your instructions for cooking the thekua, I was a bit surprised when I discovered that they had to be FRIED, deep fried, in ghee, and not baked, which is what I expected.

So, I then tried to imagine what the taste would be like. Yummy, served with (and dunked in) tea and clotted cream, or eaten with yoghurt?

Delicious either way.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Denise!

Always a pleasure to read your positive feedback. I am glad that you liked the recipe and the article.

Thank you so much for reading and commenting.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Mary!

So good to read your comments, that you liked this article.

Appreciate you for taking the time to read and comment.

Thank you so much. Have a great day!

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Marlene!

Glad to know that you plan to prepare this traditional Indian recipe. I am sure that you will like it. It’s not so difficult to make. A little bit of patience, precision, and lots of love, is all that you need for a delicious recipe.

Thank you for your support. Always a pleasure to read your positive comments.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Vidya Ji!

This dry sweet is especially made during Chath puja, Teej puja in Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and other Northern states of India.

Glad to know that you liked the article. Much appreciated.

Thank you so much!

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Misbah!

Thank you for taking the time to read and comment on this article. I am glad that you liked this traditional recipe, especially made during the festivals.

Have a great day and thank you for appreciating.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Thank you Umesh Ji, for reading and appreciating. Glad that you liked it, and would try it.

Thank you so much.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Louise!

Appreciate you for reading and commenting on this article. Glad to know that you like this recipe.

Thank you for your support.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Peggy!

Always a pleasure to read your positive comments. Glad to know that you liked this dry sweet recipe. Yes, it’s a popular snacks, while traveling, besides being a traditional offering for festivals.

Appreciate you for taking the time to read and comment. Have a great day.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Peg!

Thank you for reading and appreciating the recipe. I am glad that you liked it and the article. Hope you will try it.

Thank you and good wishes.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Farah!

I am glad that you liked the recipe. Thank you for reading and commenting.

Much appreciated.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Bill!

Appreciate your kind words about the Indian culture.

This is just a small effort on my part, to pass on the traditions to the younger generations. I keep on doing it, to my children, but online writing has a wider reach.

Thank you for always supporting my work. Have a wonderful day.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Liza!

So glad to read your thoughts about this traditional Indian food. Yes, pure ghee and coconut is used in many Indian sweets, and without sweets, no celebration is complete in Indian traditions.

Hope you will try this, and love the taste.

Thank you for reading and appreciating.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Rosina!

Appreciate your kind comments. Yes, I do believe that the more love and passion, we put in while cooking, the tastier the recipes turn out to be.

I am pleased to read your comments. Thank you for reading and appreciating.

Good day to you.

Chitrangada Sharan (author) from New Delhi, India on October 21, 2021:

Hello Pamela!

I am glad that you liked this traditional Indian sweet recipe. Thank you for reading and appreciating the article.

Have a great day. Thank you for your support.

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on October 20, 2021:

This sounds very tasty. Thanks for sharing it.

Blessings,

Denise

Mary Norton from Ontario, Canada on October 20, 2021:

I would like to try this cookie. It looks delicious.

Marlene Bertrand from USA on October 20, 2021:

These cookies are pretty and I am amazed at how they are prepared. I want to try making them.

VIDYA D SAGAR on October 20, 2021:

Thanks for sharing this delicious dish, Chitrangada. I had not heard of this dish. The ingredients are easily available and it is easy to prepare too. You have explained everything so well. I will try it sometime.

Misbah Sheikh from The World of Rebels. on October 20, 2021:

Hi Di, I have never heard of Thekua/ Khajur before. Thank you so much for sharing this delicious recipe, as well as the detailed instructions and tips.

I hope you are doing well. Take care and stay safe.

Blessings and lots of love to you.

Umesh Chandra Bhatt from Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India on October 20, 2021:

This is a very nicely presented recipe. Would try. Thanks for sharing.

Louise Powles from Norfolk, England on October 20, 2021:

I've never tried this before, but it looks and sounds very nice. =)

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on October 20, 2021:

You have well explained how to make these sweets for festivals, travel, or any other time one wishes to eat them. I have never eaten Thekua or Khajur. They sound like something I would enjoy, and the design is so pretty. Thanks for your recipe.

Peg Cole from North Dallas, Texas on October 20, 2021:

These look yummy and so pretty! Thanks for sharing this recipe. Your instructions are precise and well explained.

Farah N Huq from Dhaka, Bangladesh on October 20, 2021:

This sounds like a delicious snack. Will try it soon. Thank you for sharing this new recipe.

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on October 20, 2021:

Wonderful cultural lesson, my friend. I really enjoy learning about your culture. Thank you for taking the time to share with us all.

Liza from USA on October 20, 2021:

I am familiar with the ingredients such as the spices you've used in the recipe. Although I have never seen or had Thekua, I'm sure it is delicious. I love anything with ghee and coconut in a snack.

Oh, I appreciated the introduction of Thekua, Chitrangada. You have introduced it well. The instructions are clear, therefore, easy to follow. Thank you for sharing! Oh, I bet it's good with tea.

Rosina S Khan on October 20, 2021:

Thekua or Khajur is a new Indian recipe for me. But I know after the step-by-step instructions, they are not hard to make. Yes, we should pour our passion and love into them while cooking because they become extra scrumptious that way. LOL! Thank you, Chitrangada, for sharing this wonderful recipe. I virtually enjoyed it a lot.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on October 20, 2021:

I have never had a Thekua or Khajur, Chitrangada. They look delicious. After reading the recipe I knew I would enjoy them. Thank you for sharing this recipe with good instructions.

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