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Salmon Coulibiac Recipes for Dinner

Nabiilah is an author who loves writing fantasy / teen fiction novels like The Other Side of Paradise and The Infinity Coven Trilogy

salmon-coulibiac-recipes-for-dinner

Salmon Coulibiac Recipe

Ingredients:

Seafood
14 fillet inches: 2 lb salmon

Produce
3 tbsp: Dill, fresh
4: Garlic cloves
1: Lemons
2: Lemons, Zest from
15: Mushrooms, white
1: Onion, medium
1 tbsp: Parsley, fresh
1: Shallot, large

Refrigerated
1: Egg
4: Eggs, large

Canned goods
1 3/4 cups: Chicken broth

Condiments
1/4 cup: Lemon juice

Pasta & grains
1 cup: Rice, white long-grain

Baking & spices
1: Black pepper, Ground
1/2 tsp: Paprika, smoked
2 1/2 tsp: Salt

Bread & baked goods
3 sheets: Puff pastry, frozen

Dairy
18 tbsp: Butter

Beer, wine & spirits
1/2 cup: White wine

Instructions:

  • Using a sharp knife, remove the skin from the salmon and remove any bones. Trim the tail end of salmon and the sides, to make the salmon filet even sized. Ideally, the salmon should be about 6-inches wide. Keep the trimmed pieces and add them to the coulibiac also. Pat the salmon dry with a paper towel, then spread the herbed butter evenly all over.
  • Preheat the oven to 375F/190C and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper or silicone mat.
  • Begin assembling the pastry: roll out one sheet of thawed puff pastry into a rectangle, or large enough to enough to have at least 1 to 1 1/2-inches around the entire fillet. Transfer the dough onto the lined pan. Spread about 1 ½ cups of the mushroom rice onto the pastry in the center, creating a bed for the salmon to sit atop of.
  • Place the seasoned salmon on top of the rice, then top the fish a layer of sliced, hardboiled eggs.
  • Top the salmon with the remaining mushroom rice, forming and gently pressing it into a dome shape. Roll out the second sheet of puff pastry wider than the first, to cover the fillings comfortably. Brush the beaten egg onto the pastry around the salmon and rice, then add the second layer of dough. Use a fork to press the two layers together, sealing the fillings inside.
  • Seal the dough around the edges using a fork, then use a sharp knife to cut away the excess dough, leaving just ½ – 1-inch border all around. Brush the entire pastry generously with the egg wash.
  • Bake in the preheated oven for 45 to 50 minutes, until the pastry is a rich, golden color. Remove the pastry from the oven and let it cool for at least 15 to 20 minutes prior to serving. To serve, use a long, serrated knife to slice the pastry into thick slices. Serve with fresh lemon wedges and lemon sauce on the side.
salmon-coulibiac-recipes-for-dinner

Salmon Coulibiac With Kale Recipe

Ingredients:

Seafood
1: center-cut king salmon fillet thick center-cut

Produce
1 (8-ounce) bunch: Curly kale
3 tbsp: Dill, fresh
2: Garlic cloves, medium
2 tsp: Lemon zest plus
2: Pickled beets (about 4 ounces), medium

Condiments
2 tbsp: Capers plus
2 tbsp: Mustard, whole-grain

Pasta & grains
2 cups: White rice, cooked and cooled long-grain

Baking & spices
1 tsp: Black pepper
1 1/2 tsp: Kosher salt

Oils & vinegars
2 tbsp: Olive oil

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Dairy
1: 3 cup unsalted butter (2 2/3 ounces), unsalted
1 cup: Creme fraiche or sour cream

Other
1: 5 (14- x 9-inch) frozen phyllo pastry sheets (such as athens), thawed

Instructions:

  • Preheat oven to 375°F with rack positioned in lower third of oven. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Add garlic, and cook, stirring constantly, until just beginning to brown, about 1 minute. Add kale, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, until kale is wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl; let cool 15 minutes. Squeeze kale mixture in paper towels to drain excess liquid. Set aside.
  • Stir together rice, lemon zest, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a medium bowl. Stir together crème fraîche, dill, capers, caper brine, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste in a second medium bowl. Set both aside.
  • Trim salmon fillet lengthwise to form a 9- x 4-inch rectangle of even thickness; reserve scraps for another use. Sprinkle salmon with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Spread mustard evenly over top of salmon; set aside at room temperature.
  • Place 1 phyllo sheet on a parchment paper–lined baking sheet, and brush top lightly with melted butter. Top with a second phyllo sheet to create a neat stack. Brush top of second sheet lightly with melted butter. Continue stacking, brushing each layer with butter, until stack is 6 sheets thick. Do not brush top of last sheet. Cover stack with a damp kitchen towel.
  • Uncover stack of 6 phyllo sheets on the baking sheet. Spread rice mixture lengthwise in a rectangle of even thickness (about 3/4 inch thick) in center of phyllo stack. Top with salmon. Arrange beet slices, slightly overlapping, on salmon. Top with kale in an even layer.
  • Fold edges of phyllo base up around filling to form a boat shape, pleating as needed. Place stack of 4 phyllo sheets lengthwise on top of filling, and fold down, tucking edges under coulibiac. Re-melt butter, if needed. Brush top and sides of coulibiac with melted butter, reserving about 2 tablespoons for drizzling.
  • Bake until golden brown.

Salmon Coulibiac With Mushrooms Recipe

Ingredients:

Seafood
400 ml: Fish stock
750 g: Side of salmon
1 240g pack: Smoked salmon trimmings

Produce
2: Bay leaves and 4 thyme, sprigs
200 g: Button mushrooms
1/2: Lemon, juice of
1 1/2: Lemons, zest and juice of
4 tbsp: Parsley
3: Shallots

Refrigerated
1: Egg
4: Eggs, large

Pasta & grains
200 g: Basmati and wild rice

Baking & spices
1 tsp: Coriander seeds
1: Flour
1: Some sea salt flakes

Oils & vinegars
3 tbsp: Olive oil, good-quality extra-virgin

Dairy
50 g: Butter

Beer, wine & spirits
75 ml: White wine

Other
null: 1½ bags watercress, spinach and rocket salad

Instructions:

  • Put the eggs into a saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Once boiling, time the eggs for 7 minutes to hard-boil them. Drain them, run under the cold tap to cool, then transfer to a bowl of cold water to cool completely before shelling and roughly chopping. Set aside.
  • Melt half the butter in a large saucepan or casserole over a medium-low heat. Add the shallots, herb bundle and a generous pinch of salt and sauté gently until softened, about 15 minutes, stirring from time to time. Tip the mixture into a large bowl. Remove the bundle of herbs and reserve.
  • Warm the remaining butter in the same pan over a medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms, coriander seeds and a pinch of salt then sauté, stirring, until the mushrooms have given up a lot of their moisture and taken on some colour. Pour in the wine and simmer until almost completely evaporated. Scoop out the mushrooms with a slotted spoon and add to the bowl with the shallots.
  • Tip the rice into the pan in which you fried the mushrooms and stir to coat in the buttery juices. Return the bundle of herbs to the pan and pour in the hot stock. Bring to the boil, stir, cover and simmer gently for 20 minutes.
  • Add the rice to the bowl with the shallots and mushrooms. Leave to cool to room temperature, then transfer to the fridge to cool completely. When it's cold, add the dill, parsley and the zest and juice of lemon. Stir to combine, taste and season.
  • Cut the salmon fillet in half lengthways, along the natural dividing line, and make sure that there aren't any stray bones.
  • Preheat the oven to 220°C. To make the coulibiac, line a large baking tray with greased baking paper. Place the smaller pastry sheet in the middle of it. Spoon half of the rice mixture down the centre of the pastry, leaving a 4 cm border all around, then gently add half of the salmon trimmings on top.
  • Top with the salmon fillets, turning one piece round so that the two tapered ends meet and slightly overlap in the middle to make a rectangle. Season well and sprinkle over the remaining lemon zest and juice. Top with the other half of the rice mixture, followed by the boiled eggs, and finish with the rest of the salmon trimmings. Pack everything down gently with your hands, so it holds together firmly, shaping it into a high mound. Brush the edges of the pastry with some beaten egg.
  • Cover with large sheet of pastry and bake till golden brown.

Salmon Coulibiac With Spinach Recipe

Ingredients:

Seafood
1: Salmon, fillet

Produce
12 cups: Baby spinach, fresh
1/2 cup: Cranberries, dried
1 bunch: Dill, fresh
2: Lemons

Refrigerated
3: Egg
8: Eggs, hard

Baking & spices
3 1/2 cups: All-purpose flour, unbleached
1/2 tsp: Salt

Oils & vinegars
2 tbsp: Olive oil

Nuts & seeds
1/2 cup: Pine nuts, toasted

Drinks
1/4 cup: Ice water

Dairy
1 1/2 cups: Butter, unsalted
2 tbsp: Butter

Instructions:

  • In a food processor, pulse the flour, salt and butter until pea-sized pieces form. Add the water and eggs. Pulse again until a ball starts to form. Remove the dough from the processor. Shape into two discs. Cover in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  • With the rack in the lowest position, preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • Place the salmon on the first baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper. Drizzle with the olive oil, cover with the dill and lemon slices. Bake for 8 minutes.
  • In a large skillet over medium-high heat, wilt the spinach in the butter. Season with salt and pepper. With a sieve, drain the spinach, pressing to squeeze out any excess liquid. Set aside.
  • On a floured work surface, roll out both discs of dough to the same shape as the salmon fillet, but larger in size, and to a thickness of about ¼ inch (5 mm) each.
  • Place one piece of dough on the second baking sheet. Place the fish in the centre of the dough. Cover the fish with the spinach. Sprinkle with the pine nuts and cranberries. Place the hard-boiled eggs lengthwise down the centre of the fillet, pushing the filling up slightly to stabilize the eggs. Brush the edges of the dough with the beaten egg. Cover with the second piece of dough and crimp the edges to seal the pastry. Trim any excess dough. Brush with the beaten egg.
  • Roll out the dough scraps to a thickness. Cut the dough into wide strips. Place the strips on the pastry in a pattern of your choice. Brush with a little beaten egg. Make three incisions in the top of the pastry, between two eggs, to allow steam to escape during cooking.
  • Bake for about 40 minutes or until the crust is golden brown. Let rest for 10 minutes before serving.
  • Slice the pastry through the centre of the eggs.

Salmon Coulibiac Recipe

Ingredients:

Seafood
1: Salmon

Produce
1: Spinach

Refrigerated
1: Eggs

Condiments
1: Hollandaise sauce

Bread & baked goods
1: Puff pastry

Instructions:

  • Wash the spinach and remove the large stems. Place it in a large pot with just the water that clings to the leaves. Cook covered over medium heat until the spinach is wilted. Drain, refresh under cold water and leave to cool.
  • When cool, squeeze out as much water with your hands as you can, chop the spinach coarsely, and transfer it to the work bowl of the food processor. Add the eggs, nutmeg, salt, and pepper; then process until quite finely chopped. Set aside.
  • Lay the salmon on the pastry skin-side down, and centered to leave an even border all around. With a spatula, spread the spinach mixture evenly over the top of the salmon and smooth it out. Dampen the exposed edges of pastry around the salmon with water. Drape the second sheet of puff pastry over the salmon, shaping the top pastry sheet around the fish and pressing it firmly against the bottom pastry sheet to seal it. With a sharp knife, trim the excess pastry from around the salmon, making the whole package into the shape of a fish. Cut two small holes for steam to escape in the top. Brush with egg.
  • Bake for 20 minutes.

History of Salmon Coulibiac

Coulibiac is the French version of the original Russian dish that, the story goes, the godfather of French cuisine, Auguste Escoffier, learned in order to serve to officers from the Russian navy who were guests at Restaurant Français in Nice, which was run by his uncle.

Coulibiac was invented in the 17th century in Russia, and it became popular in France in the 19th century, when French chefs brought it back home from Russia.

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