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How to Cook Filipino-Style Chicken & Pork Adobo Or Chicken Pork Adobo Recipe?

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Adobo is made with pantry staples such as white vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, peppercorns, and bay leaves to make a marinade.

Adobo is made with pantry staples such as white vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, peppercorns, and bay leaves to make a marinade.

The Origins of Adobo Filipino Cuisine in the Philippines

Adobo is a common cooking method used in Filipino cuisine that is indigenous to the Philippines. When the Spanish first explored the Philippines in the late 16th century, they discovered a cooking method that involved vinegar stewing. The Spanish called it adobo due to its superficial resemblance to the Spanish adobo. The Filipino adobo is prepared in a completely different manner than the Spanish marinade. Vinegar, soy sauce or patis (fish sauce), black peppercorns, and bay leaves are among the main ingredients in Philippine adobo. Chilis, paprika, oregano, and tomatoes are not common ingredients. Adobong Puti (White Adobo prepared with salt rather than soy sauce) and Adobong Tuyo are two other notable versions of Philippine adobo (Dry Adobo). The dish is typically prepared with pork or chicken, but it can also be prepared with only vegetables such as water spinach, or green beans. Unlike Spanish and Mexican adobos, which are spicier or infused with oregano, Philippine adobo has a distinct salty, sour, and sometimes sweet flavor.

This is a recipe for Filipino Pork and Chicken Adobo. It's a dish made with pork or chicken slices cooked in soy sauce, vinegar, and garlic. Onions are included in some versions. Adobo, like Sinigang, is a popular Filipino dish. In this Filipino Adobo recipe, the pork is marinated in soy sauce and crushed garlic. Vinegar can also be used as a marinade ingredient if desired. Mexican adobo, on the other hand, is marinated with chilies, garlic, cinnamon, and oregano. Both dishes have their own distinct appearance and flavor. Comparing which of the two dishes is the best would be unfair because we all have different flavor preferences. Adobo can be made with a variety of proteins in general.

This is a recipe for Filipino Pork Adobo. It's a dish made with pork slices cooked in soy sauce, vinegar, and garlic. Onions are included in some versions. Adobo, like Sinigang, is a popular Filipino dish. This is a recipe for Filipino Pork Adobo.

This is a recipe for Filipino Pork Adobo. It's a dish made with pork slices cooked in soy sauce, vinegar, and garlic. Onions are included in some versions. Adobo, like Sinigang, is a popular Filipino dish. This is a recipe for Filipino Pork Adobo.

Almost every region in the Philippines has its own take on pork adobo. At times, a location may have multiple versions. The recipe for Basic Pork Adobo is provided below. There are also versions with additional ingredients. Pork and Chicken Adobo is probably one of the most popular dishes at family picnics. Adobo-style pork and chicken slices are combined in this dish. It can be made in the same way as this recipe, with or without onions. The Chicken and Pork Adobo combine two traditional Filipino dishes into one delectable dish. It's bursting with savory, garlicky flavors that are sure to hit the spot after being braised low and slow in vinegar, soy sauce, and spices. This is our clan's signature summer dish in the Philippines. My aunties and uncles would prepare a large portion for every summer outing. We'd go to Samal Island in Mindanao to rent a pool for the clan, and they'd bring two large pots (kaldero).

It's always pork adobo with eggs. This is my personal favorite. There are two approaches. Both methods necessitate boiling the eggs ahead of time. When the pork is tender, add boiled eggs to the first version.

It's always pork adobo with eggs. This is my personal favorite. There are two approaches. Both methods necessitate boiling the eggs ahead of time. When the pork is tender, add boiled eggs to the first version.

The eggs absorb the soy sauce and become darker in color as a result. When cooking this way, be mindful of the time. We don't want the eggs to be overcooked. How do we know if an egg has been overcooked? It is straightforward. Iron is found in egg yolk. When eggs are cooked for a longer period of time than usual, the iron turns greenish. This color is formed between the yolk and the egg white. These is commonly referred to as rings. Cut the boiled egg in half and look at the color of the outer yolk. When the egg has a dark ring around it, it is overcooked. The other version of the adobo with egg is simpler and does not risk overcooking the eggs (unless it was overcooked during the boiling process). Before serving, place boiled eggs on the serving plate. The eggs retain their white color as well.

 Vinegar can also be used as a marinade ingredient if desired. Mexican adobo, on the other hand, is marinated with chilies, garlic, cinnamon, and oregano. Both dishes have their own distinct appearance and flavor. Great with hot rice!

Vinegar can also be used as a marinade ingredient if desired. Mexican adobo, on the other hand, is marinated with chilies, garlic, cinnamon, and oregano. Both dishes have their own distinct appearance and flavor. Great with hot rice!

How to Cook Pork Adobo?

To enhance the flavor of the pork, this version suggests marinating it. This recipe calls for pork belly and other fatty cuts of pork.

  1. The pork belly should first be marinated in soy sauce and crushed garlic. It is preferable to marinate it overnight. If time is of the essence, one hour should suffice. Some people like to add vinegar during the cooking process. You are free to do so if you prefer.
  2. Remove the marinade. Keep it for later. Browning the marinated pork is required. Preheat a saucepan. Combine the pork with the garlic. A few tablespoons of cooking oil can also be added. Cook the pork until it is golden brown.
  3. Cook until the pork is tender. Pour any remaining marinade into a measuring cup. Add water as well. Allow the liquid to boil. This is where I add the whole peppercorn and the dried bay leaves. These ingredients round out my adobo pork. Boiling the pork for 40 minutes should be enough to tenderize it. There are times when you must cook for an extended period of time.
  4. If you did not include vinegar in the marinade, pour it into the pot and cook for 10 minutes. This recipe does not require the addition of salt. Use it only if you believe it is necessary.

Ingredients

  • 2-pound pork belly
  • 2 tbsp minced or crushed garlic
  • 5 dried bay leaf pieces
  • four tbsp vinegar
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon peppercorns
  • 2 c. water
  • Season with salt to taste

Instructions:

Marinate the pork belly for at least 1 hour in a mixture of soy sauce and garlic.
Heat the pot, then add the marinated pork belly and cook for a few minutes.
Pour in the remaining marinade, including the garlic.
Bring the water, whole peppercorn, and dried bay leaves to a boil. Cook for 40 minutes to 1 hour.
Simmer for 12 to 15 minutes after adding the vinegar.
Season with salt to taste.
Serve immediately. Please share and enjoy!

Adobo is considered the national dish of the Philippines. This dish consists of chunks of Chicken or Pork or both cooked.

Adobo is considered the national dish of the Philippines. This dish consists of chunks of Chicken or Pork or both cooked.

How to Cook Chicken Adobo?

Ingredients

  • 1 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 garlic bulb, peeled and smashed
  • 2 tbsp. kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper, coarsely ground
  • one bay leaf
  • 2 pounds bone-in bone-in chicken thighs or drumsticks
  • 1 teaspoon of canola oil
  • 1 cup of water

Instructions:

Combine the first 6 ingredients in a shallow dish. Refrigerate, covered, for 20-30 minutes. Drain, but keep the marinade. Dry the chicken.
Brown the chicken in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the reserved marinade and water. Bring the water to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cook, uncovered, for 20-25 minutes, or until chicken is no longer pink and sauce is slightly reduced. Remove the bay leaf. Serve the chicken with the cooking sauce if desired.

Adobo Alternatives and Additional Ingredients

  • Pork - Use any cut of pork you like. For the best results, I recommend using pork belly. If you're trying to avoid fats, opt for leaner cuts. Tenderloin of pork is a better option. This is much more tender and has much less fat than a pork belly. This recipe can also be used with other proteins such as chicken and goat meat.
  • Onion - The use of onion is not recommended in this recipe. I believe onions enhance the flavor of adobo. This recipe calls for red, yellow, or white onion. Make certain to cut it into small pieces.
  • Dried Bay Leaves - This is a common ingredient that can be found in the spice section of your local supermarket. This makes a huge difference when cooking adobo, believe it or not.
  • A traditional ingredient is whole peppercorns. It makes no difference whether you use crushed peppercorns or ground black pepper. Sichuan peppercorns are also suitable substitutes.
  • Sugar - Adding a teaspoon of sugar to your pork adobo will make it sweeter. I enjoy the flavor of adobo with a little sugar.
  • Boiled egg and pineapple chunks add watery flavors to your Adobo Recipe.
Almost every region in the Philippines has its own take on pork adobo. At times, a location may have multiple versions. The recipe for Basic Pork Adobo is provided below. There are also versions with additional ingredients.

Almost every region in the Philippines has its own take on pork adobo. At times, a location may have multiple versions. The recipe for Basic Pork Adobo is provided below. There are also versions with additional ingredients.

Do Chicken and Pork Go Well Together?

Of course, pork chops are also known as "the other white meat," can be cooked alongside the chicken. They actually complement each other very well, and each adds extra flavor to the other without being overpowering. Chicken and pork are two of the most popular meats used in adobo, and our recipe combines the best of both worlds. It combines pork and chicken serving cuts into one delectable dish that is sure to satisfy everyone's cravings. There are no complicated ingredients; instead, simple pantry staples that you most likely already have on hand are used. Simple preparation; the meat can be purchased already cut up from a butcher shop. It requires less cleanup because it is prepared in a single pan. Delicious flavors! Over piping-hot steamed rice, fork-tender pork, fall-off-the-bone chicken, and a thick, hearty sauce is heaven on a plate! While boneless breast or thigh meat can be used, bone-in provides the best flavor. You can use bone-in legs, thighs, wings, or a whole chicken cut up into serving pieces. I used pork shoulder, but pork belly and spare ribs are also excellent choices. If you prefer a leaner cut, use pork ham, loin, or center-cut chops.

Other than browning the pork, which requires a longer cook time, a bit before adding the chicken to prevent the latter from falling apart while the former sufficiently tenderizes, this Chicken Pork Adobo recipe is not much different from other versions made solely of chicken or pork. If you have time, marinate the meat for about 30 minutes in soy sauce and aromatics to enhance the flavor. Reserve the marinade and drain well to ensure proper browning.

How to Cook for Chicken Pork Adobo Recipe Combination?

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon of canola oil
  • 1 onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 garlic head, peeled and minced
  • 1 1/2 pounds of pork shoulder or belly cubes
  • 1 1/2 pounds of chicken, divided into serving pieces
  • 1-quart vinegar
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 cup of water
  • two bay leaves
  • season with salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook until the onions and garlic are softened.
Cook, turning occasionally until the pork is lightly browned. Cook for 7 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Cook, stirring occasionally until the chicken is lightly browned and the juices run clear.
Bring the vinegar to a boil, uncovered and without stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes.

Pour in the soy sauce, water, and bay leaves. Continue to cook for 2 to 3 minutes.
Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the meat is tender and the sauce has reduced.
Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve immediately while its hot.

Adobo is considered the national dish of the Philippines. This dish consists of chunks of Chicken or Pork or both cooked.

Adobo is considered the national dish of the Philippines. This dish consists of chunks of Chicken or Pork or both cooked.

Here are some recipes for Adobo Chicken or Pork Adobo

Pork Adobo with Tofu is a high-protein adobo. This is ideal for those who prefer their adobo to be mild in flavor. This recipe calls for fried tofu. When making this, always use extra firm tofu. You can buy raw tofu and fry it yourself, or you can buy packaged fried tofu from the supermarket. The tofu absorbs most of the sauce during the cooking process, which reduces the flavor slightly. This is a great dish to make if you're into bodybuilding or a protein-rich diet. However, make sure to use lean cuts of pork.

Spicy Pork Adobo is a favorite among our beer-drinking group of friends. As far as I'm concerned, this is the ideal pulutan. The hotter it gets, the better it gets. I attempted to make this dish with the former world's spiciest chili pepper, Bhut Jolokia (It lost its crown to the Carolina Reaper, which is way spicier). The end result was a very tasty and extremely spicy adobo. The spice lingers in the mouth for quite some time. You have been warned.

Adobong Baboy Gata is a timeless classic. This is well-known for making people on a low-rice diet crave more rice. It's very rich, tasty, and delectable. Add a few pieces of Thai chili pepper and you'll be hooked.

Another variation I tried was Pork Adobo with Potato. This is a saucier version of pork adobo with potato cubes. I'm not sure where this dish came from. It could have started out as a filler to feed more people. Nonetheless, I enjoyed the flavor. I believe it could be improved by pan-frying the potato first. The potato absorbs the majority of the flavors. When eaten with rice, the potato can cause a carbohydrate overload. This is a great dish to eat before going to the gym or starting a marathon.

My suggestion for the main course, serve chicken and pork adobo with steamed rice on the side. To add a fresh note of flavor, some people like to serve Dole bananas alongside the hearty meal.

Being a part of an adobosilog entails (adobo, egg with rice) breakfast, the dish is often served with garlic fried rice and sunny-side-up eggs. Adobo is a great make-ahead meal because it keeps for days. Allow cooling completely before transferring to a container with a tight-fitting lid to store. Store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 2 months.
Reheat in a saucepan to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit, or warm in the microwave at 2 to 3-minute intervals until thoroughly heated.

Chicken or Pork Adobo is a traditional Filipino dish made with soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, peppercorns, and dried bay leaves. Meats like chicken, pork, beef, and goat meat are frequently used. There are also adobo dishes that include fish and seafood, vegetables, and rice. We have compiled a list of some of our favorite adobo dishes for you to reference. You can save this post for future reference or simply browse around to see which adobo recipes you want to cook today or plan to include in your weekly menu. Enjoy these insanely tasty adobo dishes!


This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Faith Nacario

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