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Have You Ever Eaten Glued Meat Or Pink Slime? You Probably Have!

This lovely Filet Mignon may not be pure beef.  It could be Glued Meat!

This lovely Filet Mignon may not be pure beef. It could be Glued Meat!

I Became Ill After Eating A Beautiful Juicy Steak

I had dinner out at an upscale restaurant with a daughter the other night. I ate a delicious filet mignon. About 2 a.m. I was awakened by a severe stomach ache followed by diarrhea.

I can usually eat anything without getting an upset stomach. My children envy the fact I never take any antacids the way they do. They say I have a stomach made of iron!

So, in the wee hours, in between running to the bathroom, I began researching symptoms and causes of my sudden illness. I knew if I was not better by morning, I’d have to see my doctor. Oh, the pain!!

I hesitate to blame the restaurant for my illness, but I believe I ate glued meat!

I discovered several references to the subject of Glued Meat, and how the enzyme that is used in the process of making glued meat, is making people sick. Some people can be allergic to the substance used in gluing pieces of cheap meat together to make one nice big steak. Some restaurants are using this method in order to improve the looks of cheap meat.

We now not only have to be concerned about the addition of GMO (genetically modified organisms) in our food, now there is this added concern.


This Is How Glued Meat Is Made

The process, begins with sprinkling an enzyme called a Transglutaminase enzyme, over small cuts of sometimes lesser-quality meat, and binding them together with the hands. This enzyme (meat glue) is a powdery substance made from an animal blood clotting agent.The meat is then rolled in plastic wrap and left refrigerated for 12 hours.

The rolled product is then sliced into a large piece of meat. This looks like a filet mignon, or a mouth watering sirloin steak!

Some processing plants use a mold to "glue" the small pieces of meat. Then the end product is removed from the mold and sliced.

It is this meat glue that is causing people to become ill. In many cases the people believe they have food poisoning!

This so-called “meat glue” is approved by the USDA and considered safe to eat.

If this meat is sold in our supermarkets the label must inform the consumer by using the term “reformed”.

Restaurants are not obligated to inform their guests they are eating “glued meat”.

This allows chefs to sell the final product as a prime cut!


The Danger Of Eating Glued Meat

The so-called 'meat glue' has been used in American restaurants and the kitchens of banquet halls for decades. During the slaughter, production, packaging and shipping of meat, the area that is most likely to be contaminated is the exterior. The majority of the time, that bacteria is killed off when the meat is cooked.

Because steak made from "glued meat" is created using many multiple pieces, it essentially compresses the exteriors of various slices, and those exteriors become the new interiors of the final product. As a result, the meat may not be fully cooked on the inside when the new piece of steak is cooked.

People like myself who enjoys their steak on the rare side are especially at risk because the middle of the cut of meat will not be cooked thoroughly.

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I wonder if cruise ships allow glued meat. Maybe that is why so many people become ill while on a cruise.


This photo shows what a piece of Glued Meat looks like before it is  sliced into a Filet Mignon.  It has many pieces of lesser quality of meat glued together to form this lovely steak.

This photo shows what a piece of Glued Meat looks like before it is sliced into a Filet Mignon. It has many pieces of lesser quality of meat glued together to form this lovely steak.

I May Now Become A Vegetarian!

Just knowing about glued meat, and how it is made, has made me really think more about becoming a vegetarian! I would miss my T-Bone and Sirloins, but I don't care to eat glued meat.

Now that you are aware of Glued Meat, there is another additive that can be used to make ground beef more visually appealing and extends the final amount.

This method is known as “Pink Slime”, and it is also approved by the USDA as safe!



Just looking at this Steak makes my mouth water, but I will not order it in a restaurant any longer!

Just looking at this Steak makes my mouth water, but I will not order it in a restaurant any longer!

Learn Now About Pink Slime

As of March 2012, 70 percent of ground beef sold in the United States supermarkets contained pink slime. Boneless beef trimmings are heated to 107-109 degrees. This melts the fat from the trimmings. The beef is then removed by centrifugal force, and then is treated to a gaseous ammonium hydroxide.

The end product is now ready to be shipped to supermarkets, restaurants, school cafeterias, or fast food stores. This “pink slime” will then be added to ground beef.


Lovely Hamburgers, aren't they?  They could have Pink Slime added to them before they were purchased!

Lovely Hamburgers, aren't they? They could have Pink Slime added to them before they were purchased!

One Of The Largest Fast Food Restaurants Admitted They Used Pink Slime

McDonalds was accused several years ago of adding pink slime to their burgers and chicken nuggets. They have admitted they did use this addition between 2004 and 2011. They deny using any pink slime now!

I can't help but wonder if other fast food restaurants are still using this pink slime.

This child is eating a healthy lunch; NO ground beef here!

This child is eating a healthy lunch; NO ground beef here!

Pink Slime Has Been Used In Our Public Schools

Because of public outcry and concern, thousands of schools across the U.S. rushed last year to stop feeding their students meat that contained the ammonia-treated beef, known by industry as Pink Slime. This was good news to all parents!

Now we find some states are once again are serving pink slime. Schools in Illinois, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Texas have changed their positions and are now allowing the controversial product. starting in the 2013-2014 school year!, It’s no wonder: Adding this pink slime to ground beef brings down the cost of the ground beef by about 3 percent, which can add up quickly in a program that feeds more than 31 million school children each day.

One can’t blame the school systems who are under severe budget cuts from trying to cut back on their food budgets, but I cannot agree with this position.

In my state of Florida, a bill was introduced in 2013 asking Congress to completely outlaw this use to all our schools; however, the bill died the same year! As far as I know, no other bill has been introduced.


What Are We Consumers Do?

We consumers are at the mercy of the people who prepare our food. I am concerned not just for the meat we eat, but because of GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) and its effect on our food supply.

So what are we to do?? Unless we can raise our own cows, pigs and chickens, and grow our own vegetables, we will continue to be vulnerable to the dangers of the foods that are available to us.

The next time you want to order a sirloin steak in a restaurant, I would advise you to inquire of the wait staff or a manager if their meat has be glued.

P.S. They may not tell you the truth!!

I believe there are at least two dangers when we consume glued meat or pink slime:

1. We could be allergic (sensitive) to the enzyme that make up the glue used in the finished product.

2. The interior of the meat could harbor E. Coli or many other pathogens that could lead to serious illness or death!

This informative article tells us which stores sells Pink Slime

  • Supermarkets and Pink Slime (BLBT) - Who has it?
    Who has it and who doesn't? Are you looking to figure out how to avoid getting SLIMED at the supermarket? Here is a look at some of the stores that are using pink slime and some of the stores that are not using pink slime.

References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enzyme

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_slimehttp://cookingissues.com/transglutaminase-aka-meat-glue/

http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2012/05/meat-glue-gross-it-

http://www.cnet.com/news/pink-slime-in-burgers-mcdonalds-hires-former-mythbuster-to-find-out/